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So it's an everyday thing... people don't want to turn off their computer while their going out to the toilet..., etc. So they hit "ALT+CTRL+L", and the GNOME-screensaver locks their Desktop. After they return they just type in their passwords, and the work could go on..OK!

BUT: There are usually problems:

NEW (today): http://gu1.aeroxteam.fr/2012/01/19/bypass-screensaver-locker-program-xorg-111-and-up/

http://www.h-online.com/open/news/item/GNOME-screen-lock-ineffective-in-openSUSE-Linux-Update-928794.html

So what is the most secure way to Lock the computer?

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3 Answers

Use the first screensaver for X servers: xscreensaver.

All the vulnerabilities that the new screensavers recently fell victim to were first found in xscreensaver, fixed and forgotten. They (both KDE and Gnome guys) try to reproduce the functionality of this software without looking at its mistakes. The sad part: they do this just for the bling.

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You could always remap that command to vlock which doesn't have either of those issues (at least not at the moment)

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The question is not answerable.

Here we have a failure observed, which can be fixed. After fixing it, it should be gone, but of course it can be reintroduced again. But you could test for the vulnerability after every update.

But you can't know of probable other errors. Maybe some other vulnerability is already in the wild for years, known by some evil guys.

If your security is very important, you may only add multiple layers of security, like logoff, like logoff and shutdown and BIOS password and disk encryption, like using a separate room and locking the door to the room and more and more and more.

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