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I know of Nessus (which is $1300 for a pro feed) and OpenVAS (which I don't like).

I use Linux so do I have any other options for vulnerability detection?

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It's worth mentioning that Rapid7's Nexpose, as of today's date, has 82739 vulnerability definitions available. –  mbrownnyc Jun 22 '12 at 0:31
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migrated from superuser.com Apr 2 '12 at 8:13

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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

To expand on the other Rory's list a bit, if you're using Linux for VA style activities the main one I'm aware of in addition to Nessus and OpenVAS is

  • Nexpose. Has a community edition which is free as well as paid for editions. The community edition has a restrictions of number of IP addresses scanned, but otherwise (AFAIK) is fully featured

If you're using windows for VA there's also

  • Eeye Retina. Again commercial product with a community edition locked to a max of 128 IPs

Those two are general VA products. On top of that there's managed services (eg, Qualys) and tools that are more specific in nature (eg, web app. scanners like IBM Appscan and Arachni).

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Thank you. I'm running it off Backtrack, so Linux based. –  Joseph Apr 5 '12 at 21:28
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There are quite a few (read loads) in this space. Some examples:

  • nmap - can run on *Nix'es and Windows

The following offer internal or external vulnerability scanning and management

  • Core Impact - may be outside your budget
  • Microsoft Baseline Analyzer - free (but obviously focused on Microsoft)
  • Retina
  • Nexpose
  • Qualys
  • Randomstorm
  • Accunetix
  • GFI
  • Outpost
  • Appscan
  • etc.

Then you have web vulnerability scanners like nikto and code assessment tools like Fortify

Have a read of Fyodor's sectools list

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Don't forget GreenBone security, I've just started playing with it and it does use openVAS but Joseph didn't list why he doesn't like openVAS. See if you like GreenBone in BackTrack 5 –  Brad Apr 2 '12 at 16:38
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Sorry for the delay on a response. I find OpenVas too buggy, slow and annoying to get going. Think of Nessus, you start one service and it's running. Openvas needs 2-3 services, and half the time I can't access the web interface. The desktop interface has locked up my computer to the point of needing to pull the plug. Plus, the times I have gotten it to scan (using Metasploit), I got errors upon trying to import, and using the desktop, it wouldn't even show me the report. Too many issues for me. –  Joseph Apr 5 '12 at 21:27
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NTO Spider and Burp Suite Pro are both another couple of web app scanners :) And you can count things like Secuina PSI or CSI (personal or corporate) which is more in the vein of patch management and app level vulns. If you're including that then there are heaps more products to do with patch management... –  NULLZ Mar 25 '13 at 3:58
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Sorry for the delay, I've found this page today.

I'm using a VA solution called IKare that includes OpenVas and Nmap. Even if you don't like Openvas, the UI is cool and the solution run well and fast for discovering and VA (scanners are ready-to-go). The solution is more oriented to monitoring to perform daily or weekly scans.

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I ended up getting Nexpose to work, free version does quite well. Though I'll definitely look into the others. Thanks guys! –  Joseph Mar 22 '13 at 17:59
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