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Just asking if there is any known exploit that allows a client connected a win server 2003 sp2 x64 via SunRay thin-client to infiltrate (or preform a local privilege escalation on) the server. The thin clients currently have limited privileges, no cd/usb input and neither the server nor the clients have any internet access.

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

Windows Server 2003 SP2 is out of MSFT's support lifecycle. Microsoft requires your server to be at SP3 in order to be eligible for security and other hotfixes.

Mainstream support for Win 2003 SP3 ended 7/13/2010.

Extended support ends 7/14/2015.

Your server is vulnerable all the security patches that SP3 fixed. Of course your deployment mitigates this somewhat.

http://support.microsoft.com/lifecycle/search/default.aspx?sort=PN&alpha=windows+server+2003+&Filter=FilterNO

If the SunRay thin client issues an RDP call to your server, and the ethernet cable to the thin client is disconnected and placed into a laptop (etc), then the RDP could be exploited. There are several known issues with unpatched RDP.

There are also MITM issues with Win2003 RDP if the attacker saw an administrator log in from another machine.

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Thanks for the reply. The system's 480 clients are connecting via RDP but the network is constantly monitored. My main concern is if that an attacker with access to one of the clients can take over locally without any external software or access to the boot menu. –  user1978045 Feb 21 '13 at 20:06
    
You're asking two different questions: Can the server be exploited? and Can the client take over locally?. The answer to both can be yes. For example, can clients access csc.exe in the .NET framework? If so, they can use notepad (in theory) to write a program to exploit a known vulnerability on the server. No local "exploit" is needed. –  makerofthings7 Feb 21 '13 at 20:18
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