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I need to find a solution for one of my clients who is asking me to implement a esignature solution.

I was thinking of suggesting some solutions like DocuSign or EchoSign.

But recently my client said he wants a closed system esignature.

I searched some sites and i found out the basic difference between closed system and open system esignature.

http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfCFR/CFRSearch.cfm?CFRPart=11&showFR=1

The Closed system means an environment in which system access is controlled by persons who are responsible for the content of electronic records that are on the system.

And the Open system means an environment in which system access is not controlled by persons who are responsible for the content of electronic records that are on the system.

So does this mean that i can't suggest Docusign or EchoSign anymore? Do i need to create my very own esignature solution for this or is there any libraries or framework available that can ease my process?

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1 Answer 1

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The basic difference with a closed system for esignatures is where the esigned document resides. With SaaS or Cloud based eSigning, the actual esigned document resides on their servers(for some period of time) as they offer the esigning as a service. You do have methods to retrieve the documents, but "moving" the document from the evault it was originally stored in opens legal questions as to tampering or modifying the document's data. With a closed system (like the one from my company, eSignSystems) the evault/server that maintains the tamper evident-sealed document (after it is signed) sits behind the customers firewall, not in the cloud. All security as to access, process and authentication is controlled by the customer. We believe this ensures a more legally enforeable document should the esignature ever be disputed.

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