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I want to block a single url. I am using OpenDNS now and it is working fine with website blocking on my network but the problem is that i want to block a url like http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fGH7NxSEGtA not http://www.youtube.com/

Is there a software which blocks a url. So that every computer connected to router cant access it.

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3 Answers 3

The mechanism by which one would would block a URL requires protocol level filtering - this is nothing at all to do with DNS or IP routing. That you mention DNS and routing in your question makes me think that you are a bit out of your depth here.

Without a grasp of the technologies, you are more likely to make your network less secure by adding stuff to it than improving it's security. I would strongly recommend you spend some time learning about basic network technologies.

There are lots of products available off the shelf to do URL filtering (e.g. dansguardian, websense) but for these to be of any use your network needs to be configured to force all traffic which might be subject to a filtering policy though it - and that means you need to know how to configure stuff like firewalls, DHCP, port translation, HTTP proxies and/or browser configuration scripts, even before considering the complications of SSL. There are multiple ways to achieve this funneling - if you ask a more specific question the you may get a more specific answer.

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To block URL, the router must work at the HTTP level; on the DNS, only server names and IP addresses are exchanged.

You need a transparent HTTP proxy which automatically hijacks connections, recognizes HTTP requests, and applies whatever rules it was configured with. See this page for how to setup that with Squid (a well-known opensource HTTP proxy product).

You won't be able to filter HTTPS URL that way, unless you manage to subvert the client machines with a "rogue" CA of your own (installed in the "trust store" of each client), so that your proxy can generate on the fly fake server certificates that clients will accept as genuine (this is a man-in-the-middle attack setup). Some commercial products do that, but, I insist, this can work only if you can inject your own CA in the client systems, which more or less means that you have sysadmin rights on all these machines.

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To block certain websites on your PC, here' s the trick (for Windows):

Step 1: Click the Start button and select Run. Now copy and paste the following text in that Run box:
c:\WINDOWS\system32\drivers\etc\hosts Choose "Notepad" to open it.

Step 2: Go to the last line of the file, hit the enter key and type in the following format:
127.0.0.1 xxxx.com Eg: If you want to block facebook.com and myspace.com 127.0.0.1 facebook.com 127.0.0.1 myspace.com

Step 3: Save the modified file.

That's it. None of the above sites can be visited on your computer. One per line if you want to add more web sites. In this way you can only block website one by one, if you want to block websites in large scale, you can use a professional web filter which will help you easily block websites by keywords or URL. I have Aobo Filter(http://goo.gl/YWzOiM) running secretly on my PC. It is not only a web filter but also a Program blocker. It can block games, applications from running on PC.

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1  
This does not block certain parts of a website, but the whole site. The question asked was how to only block parts of a site. –  Dog eat cat world Jun 10 at 8:50
    
It blocks whole site not a part –  syed mohsin Jun 19 at 16:12

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