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On my old computer I used Truecrypt full disk encryption. My old computer however was running Windows 7 with a standard MBR partition scheme. I recently got a new laptop with the fancy UEFI support. Yes I know I could always reinstall Windows as legacy BIOS with MBR support however I would like to keep GPT\UEFI. Truecrypt does not work with UEFI yet. Neither does PGP full disk encryption.

Does anyone know of a good (prefer free) full disk encryption solution that supports GPT.

I know I could always use Bitlocker but for some reason I do not trust it considering the whole NSA scandal.

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If you don't trust BitLocker, you really probably shouldn't trust UEFI either. Putting a back door in BitLocker would be extremely risky (to the scale of MS ceasing to be a company) if it was ever discovered and abused. It's a night and day difference between letting the government access some unencrypted online records vs compromising secure systems everywhere to open a back door of dubious merit. –  AJ Henderson Aug 9 '13 at 17:56
    
Why do you say that? UEFI is pretty much BIOS 2.0. Does bitlocker offer any kind of "cloud" key backup similar to Apple? Apple will be happy to comply and give up keys. –  securityperlson Aug 9 '13 at 18:00
    
if you are going to doubt that BitLocker will protect your data, then you shouldn't trust that UEFI isn't going to allow something to be loaded before the OS to hijack your system for the government. I'm not saying I think it is likely, but simply pointing out that it's just as likely to open up abuse as BitLocker is. It was a statement about your not wanting to use Bitlocker, not a statement about UEFI being bad. –  AJ Henderson Aug 9 '13 at 18:03
    
Don't backup the key online then. I can't imagine you are required to share your keys. That would make it a non-starter for many enterprises that use BitLocker. –  AJ Henderson Aug 9 '13 at 18:05
    
Not just a backdoor either. Truecrypt we know for SURE uses AES with a strong implementation and does not truncate keys or do anything else to reduce entropy. It has been vetted by many professionals. Bitlocker on the other hand hasn't... –  securityperlson Aug 9 '13 at 18:20
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3 Answers

BitLocker and DCPP are only ones, as yet to handle GPT OS, disks. Both work great. DCPP is by far the most secure - but is expensive and not easily transportable.

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I don't think you're completely right on the TC/GPT issue. According to their documentation for V4.3:

Support for devices with a GPT partition table (GUID partitions). (Windows Vista/2003/XP)

The problem is that Windows 8 have to have GPT partitioning, so you'll have to run TC in legacy 32 bit mode. So it should work fine if you don't have UEFI BIOS or are using the legacy boot mode.

However, if you're ready to pay for it, then Jetico's BestCrypt Volume Encryption may be the best choice, although there are certainly many others out there as well. (I didn't look.)

http://www.jetico.com/products/personal-privacy/bestcrypt-volume-encryption

You also have Symantec Drive Encryption formerly 'PGP Disk encryption'.

http://www.symantec.com/drive-encryption/pricing

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If you do not trust Bitlocker, then I would suggest waiting for truecrypt to release their support for it (and since it is open source you know exactly what the code is doing). It will most likely be released on their next version. If you are using linux you can use LVM on LUKS or dm-crypt on LUKS, you will have to do a lot of editing of files and command line operations though.

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What command line operations? I just clicked 'Encrypt system' and typed in a passphrase during the installation. Easy. –  Michael Hampton Aug 10 '13 at 13:50
    
since it is open source you know exactly what the code is doing ... not since Ken Thompson's Turing Award lecture you don't. –  mlp Sep 10 '13 at 1:28
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