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Below is the SSLScan output, what does it mean with SSL Cerficate Version 2? Aren't SSLv3 and SSL Certificate Version 2 the same?

=======================================================================
Prefered Server Cipher(s): 
SSLv3 256 bits AES256-SHA 
TLSv1 256 bits AES256-SHA 

SSL Certificate: 
Version: 2 
Serial Number: -4294967295 
Signature Algorithm: sha1WithRSAEncryption 
Issuer: /O=VMware Installer 
Not valid before: Apr 18 09:21:53 2011 GMT 
Not valid after: Oct 17 09:21:53 2022 GMT 
Subject: /C=US/ST=California/L=Palo Alto/O=VMware, Inc/OU=VMware ESX Server Default Certificate/emailAddress=ssl-certificate... 
Public Key Algorithm: rsaEncryption 
RSA Public Key: (2048 bit) 
Modulus (2048 bit): 
****************************************... 
****************************************... 
Exponent: 65537 (0x10001) 
X509v3 Extensions: 
X509v3 Basic Constraints: 
CA:FALSE 
X509v3 Key Usage: 
Digital Signature, Key Encipherment, Data Encipherment 
X509v3 Extended Key Usage: 
TLS Web Server Authentication, TLS Web Client Authentication 
X509v3 Subject Alternative Name: 
DNS:localhost.test.com.sg 
Verify Certificate: 
unable to get local issuer certificate 
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1 Answer 1

If I interpret your answer correctly you mean this part of the output:

SSL Certificate: 
Version: 2

This version string is not the same as the SSL version. It shows which version of X.509 is used. SSL certificates use X.509. There are three different versions of X.509. The certificate has to claim what version it uses. So you'll find this Version: field in the certificate. The most recent version is 3 and this is the most used version. X.509 version 3 defines extensions. So for example, they are used for certificate chains. See the Wikipedia page on X.509 for some further explanations on the format.

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The X.509 version field is zero-based, see RFC 2459 §4.1: Version ::= INTEGER { v1(0), v2(1), v3(2) }. Using openssl x509 -text ... show this properly, sslscan shows only the raw integer. –  mr.spuratic Nov 28 '13 at 10:50

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