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I understand DDoS is a DoS assault from multiple sources, where a coordinated stream of requests is launched against a target.

How is DRDoS different?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

To put it straight and simple, DDOS is is making the server unavailable or denying the service to the users for a particular time.

DRDOS is sending forged requests from a target (victim) to millions of computers and making the target flooded by the responses from those computers.

EDIT (More info on DRDOS):

The attacker sends the requests from his server. Using IP address spoofing, the source address is set to that of the targeted victim, which means all the replies will go to (and flood) the target.

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"Sending from a target" - Does that mean the forged requests came from the server (since servers are usual victims)? –  ohtph Dec 3 '13 at 6:08
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The request does not really originate from the target, but the other machines think it does, so that's where they send their responses. –  j__m Dec 3 '13 at 6:11
    
@ohtph There lies the trick. The attacker sends the requests from his server. Using IP address spoofing, the source address is set to that of the targeted victim, which means all the replies will go to (and flood) the target. I have also updated it in my answer. Thanks for asking. –  Ebenezar Dec 3 '13 at 6:13
    
@j__m exactly ! –  Ebenezar Dec 3 '13 at 6:15
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@Ebenezar - Just to be a bit more pedantic, I would add to your phrase "DDOS is is making the server unavailable or denying the service to the users for a particular time [with requests coming from multiple sources, as opposed to a DoS, which usually means one source of attack]." –  Lex Dec 3 '13 at 12:09

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