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Sharing passwords and credentials between founders and employees

I use KeePass for my personal passwords.

I would want to use it for my business, too, but the only way I found, that I can use this and have multiple users, is by having multiple databases:

  • one for founders with important passwords like banks, sql-servers etc.
  • and another for lower down employees (Twitter, Facebook etc.).

Is there a good way to set this up with KeePass? Or is there a good alternative to have a great password manager and multiple user profiles, where user X can only access password set Y?

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migrated from answers.onstartups.com Sep 8 '11 at 15:39

This question came from our site for entrepreneurs looking to start or run a new business.

marked as duplicate by Hendrik Brummermann, nealmcb, Rory Alsop Dec 7 '11 at 15:42

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1 Answer

This answer was posted on answers.onstartups.com before the question was migrated to the IT Security site. Therefore it was likely not written with a focus on security.

You might find LastPass interesting - http://lastpass.com/ - their personal offering is free and you can share sensitive passwords to other lastpass users (read: your employees) so that they can use the password to log in, but cannot actually see the password. Automatically logs you into the site for web passwords, and can store regular passwords as well.

The enterprise version probably has the features you are looking for at $2 / month, but we've gotten by just fine on their free version.

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Lastpass got widely known for being forced to tell their users that they need to change all their passwords urgently because Lastpass possibly exposed all passwords to attackers. On a personal note: I think the concept of telling your password to some company without a proper SLA instead of your employees, whom you know in person, very strange. –  Hendrik Brummermann Sep 8 '11 at 17:40
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