BCrypt is an adaptive cryptographic hash function for passwords. It incorporate a salt to protect against rainbow table attacks and is also an adaptive hash - over time it can be made slower and slower so it remains resistant to specific brute-force search attacks against the hash and the salt.

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Challenging challenge: client-side password hashing and server-side password verification

We have a website where users need to log in to access privileged information. Obviously we are using SSL, but I also want to avoid plaintext passwords from accidently ending up in server logs, or ...
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Is this password hashing method secure?

I have made a custom hashing method to help make my users' passwords more secure if the database will be leaked. The encryption method is like this: A method takes an input of 1 character, gets the ...
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3answers
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Is a HMAC-ed password is more secure than a bcrypt-ed or scrypt-ed password?

Given an option , which one should I choose , a HMAC for storing a password securely or a bcrypt or scrypt library?
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How should I choose a difficulty factor for my password hashing function?

Assuming that I'm doing password hashing properly and using bcrypt, scrypt or PBKDF2, how should I go about choosing an appropriate difficulty factor? i.e rounds for bcrypt, iterations for PBKDF2 and ...
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1answer
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What is the meaning of 'adaptative' and 'over time it can be made slower' in the context of the bcrypt algorithm?

I'm reading the wikipedia definition about bcrypt but I don't understand the meaning of 'adaptative' and 'over time it can be made slower'. Can someone explain what they mean in this situation?
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Is it possible to increase the cost of BCrypt or PBKDF2 when its already calculated and without the original password?

I just wanted to know if you can increase the cost (iterations) of those two algorithms off-line. I want to increase the cost every year of my users passwords. One solution is to recalculate them ...
6
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1answer
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Does NIST really recommend PBKDF2 for password hashing?

We hesitated between BCrypt and PBKDF2 for password hashing. In many forums and blogs people say something like "In their Special Publication SP 800-132 NIST basically recommends using PBKDF2 for ...
4
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1answer
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Is BCrypt enough when saving a password into a database?

In order to allow users to connect to my website, I encrypt their password using BCrypt since it is one of the slowest algorithms to decrypt (making a compromised database longer to be decrypted). ...
7
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1answer
828 views

Would it make sense to use Bcrypt and PBKDF2 together?

I've read various opinions about whether Bcrypt or PDBKF2 is a better key derivation hashing method. The answer seems to depend on a lot of complicated factors that are not easy to analyze. Would ...
27
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1answer
3k views

Are there more modern password hashing methods than bcrypt and scrypt?

This question made me start thinking about password hashing again. I currently use bcrypt (specifically py-bcrypt). I've heard a lot about PBKDF2, and scrypt. What I'm wondering is if there are any ...
230
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Do any security experts recommend bcrypt for password storage?

On the surface bcrypt, an 11 year old security algorithm designed for hashing passwords by Niels Provos and David Mazieres, which is based on the initialization function used in the NIST approved ...