3
votes
1answer
95 views

Exploitability of use-after-free vulnerabilities

Use-after-free bugs are a particular class of memory safety bugs. How often are they exploitable, in practice? When you find a use-after-free bug in a program, is it often exploitable, rarely ...
16
votes
4answers
674 views

Tricky code to make memory-safe

I'm designing a homework challenge for students who are learning about memory safety and writing secure C code. As part of this, I am looking for a small programming task where it's non-trivial to ...
2
votes
2answers
241 views

vulnerable getlogin

I was reading "A taxonomy of Coding Errors" and I have a doubt regarding the point mentioned in C/C++ >> API Abuse >> Often Misused: Authentication(getlogin). I fail to understand the attack vector ...
10
votes
2answers
217 views

security implications of NULL dereference

Suppose we have code like this: struct somedata { int a; int b; }; struct somedata *data; /* ... */ data = malloc(sizeof(struct somedata)); data->a = something; Now, as you can see, NULL ...
15
votes
4answers
760 views

Does compiling from sources “kinda” protects from buffer overflow attacks?

While discussing buffers overflows, somebody told me that compiling your own binary for an application (with specific compilation flags) instead of using the "mainstream binary" makes it more ...
10
votes
7answers
2k views

Secure memcpy for pure C

Buffer overflows are nothing new. And yet they still appear often, especially in native (i.e. not managed) code... Part of the root cause, is usage of "unsafe" functions, including C++ staples ...
7
votes
8answers
381 views

Topics for SecureCoding course in C

So I was asked to put together a syllabus for a series of courses on the basics of secure coding, for a programming team. Though the time constraints are a bit... constraining, I'm working around ...