1
vote
2answers
82 views

Is it unsafe to hash one password with more than one salt?

I'm asking my question here since I was not able to find an answer anywhere. I have written a piece of software which stores pretty delicate passwords. I have used BCrypt as hashing algorithm with an ...
1
vote
1answer
98 views

I know scrypt is newer than bcrypt, but is there any reason it would be weaker?

From what I read, scrypt is (on paper) more secure than bcrypt, but it's pretty new so it's better to let it get time-tested and scrutinized first. However, is there any good, compelling reason to ...
4
votes
3answers
144 views

Is it good practice to SHA512 passwords prior to passing them to bcrypt?

I want to allow any-sized passwords to be allowed to be submitted. I currently use bcrypt as a key derivation function for passwords, however I have realized that it has a maximum input length of 72. ...
-1
votes
4answers
83 views

Is salted MD5 or salted SHA considered secure?

Is using something like bcrypt or scrypt necessary? The hashes are so much longer to store in a database. Can one get away with using salted MD5 or SHA and still be secure?
15
votes
2answers
527 views

Can client-side hashing reduce the denial-of-service risk with slow hashes?

When storing user's passwords that you need to verify against (but not use as plaintext) the current state of the art is: Hash the password Use a salt Use a slow hash function - bcrypt, scrypt, etc. ...
1
vote
1answer
166 views

Any reason I shouldn't be salting and hashing before putting through bCrypt?

I've been reading up on password storage and such, and have come to the conclusion that I need to be using bCrypt. I've got an implementation working correctly, but I'm wondering the best way to move ...
9
votes
6answers
2k views

Should I hash a password if it is randomly generated

The best practice is we should hash a user password using algorithms such as bcrpyt to protect the user, however, given the following conditions, is hashing in the backend still matters? the ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

Length-constant password comparison in scrypt? [duplicate]

E.g.: XORing the candidate against stored then comparing against 0. Do I need to worry? (my question is much in the same style as this question: Does bcrypt compare the hashes in ...
0
votes
1answer
98 views

Is bcrypt suitable for modern use? [duplicate]

When the subject of password hashing comes up, a lot of developers get exasperated by people using outdated, broken, or hand-rolled hashing schemes, and I frequently hear "just use bcrypt!" repeated ...
0
votes
1answer
58 views

Storing third party auth info; Is this secure?

I have a feature request to connect my PHP web-app to the users mail server. I have usually strayed away from this type of work as it will mean storing the users email passwords. My question: is it ...
1
vote
1answer
77 views

Is it possible to hash bcrypt passwords more securely?

I'm wondering if it's possible to increase the work factor of an already encrypted bcrypt password. e.g. I have a password that was encrypted with a work factor of 5, is it possible to increase the ...
0
votes
1answer
554 views

About password_hash() in PHP and storing (part of) its salt outside DB

So, i learned that new in PHP 5.5 is password-hash() which works much like crypt(). Which is more secure (slower) than md5() or sha1(). The result string is algo+hash+salt, which can be passed as-is ...
0
votes
2answers
150 views

Would multiple exposed bcrypt hashes of the same UUID v4 with random generated salt be too insecure?

I'm looking into implementing an ownership check on JSON objects and want to avoid going back to the database to ensure ownership of said object/record (i.e., to prevent a user from updating an ...
10
votes
4answers
1k views

How can I make sure password hashing is secure on computers while not being prohibitively slow on mobile devices?

I'm new to cryptography and its implementations. I'm designing an Android app where an user enters a password to retrieve some encrypted data. After some research on possible solutions I ended up with ...
2
votes
1answer
881 views

How to save the random salt to the database

As I understand it, salting and hashing passwords is the way to go. I also understand that to authenticate a salted and hashed password, the random salt needs to be saved. Does this mean that if I use ...
8
votes
1answer
1k views

“Official statement” on php.net : CRYPT_BLOWFISH is strongest hash algorithm. Why?

First: I asked this question on stackoverflow and was kindly asked to post this here again. See the original question here. According to the [early] doc pages of the new PHP 5.5 password ...
5
votes
1answer
213 views

Is the execution time for bcrypt independent of the length of the input string?

Is the execution time for bcrypt independent of the length of the input string? i.e. Should the execution time of bcrypt.hashpw('input_string', bcrypt.gensalt(12)) and ...
31
votes
8answers
3k views

Why improvising your own Hash function out of existing hash functions is so bad

I'm afraid I'll have tomatoes thrown at me for asking this old question, but here goes. After reading that cooking up your own password hash out of existing hashing functions is dangerous over and ...
3
votes
3answers
383 views

Client-Side Hashing to decrease value of password guessing heuristics

Yes, this is 'yet another client-side hashing' question. But, don't leave yet, I think there is some value here. I'd like to do something to mitigate the affect on the community as a whole when my ...
16
votes
3answers
7k views

Is bcrypt better than scrypt [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Do any security experts recommend bcrypt for password storage? I'm no security expert and do not pretend to be that's why I'm asking here. I write many PHP based ...
250
votes
10answers
29k views

Is my developer's home-brew password security right or wrong, and why?

A developer, let's call him 'Dave', insists on using home-brew scripts for password security. See Dave's proposal below. His team spent months adopting an industry standard protocol using Bcrypt. ...
3
votes
6answers
696 views

Is there a table that compares hashing algorithms by speed, relatively (machine independent)

As far as I understood*, one of the major criteria when choosing a password / salt hashing algorithm is it's speed. To prevent brute force attacks, a slower algorithm is better (and also makes it more ...
3
votes
1answer
282 views

Is there a better way to take advantage of current 'approved', 'proven', and memory/cpu-expensive algorithms while using salts and peppers?

I've read about the concepts presented in these two questions: Pre-hash password before applying bcrypt to avoid restricting password length Would it make sense to use Bcrypt and PBKDF2 together? I ...
9
votes
6answers
2k views

Client side password hashing

Edit: Updated to put more emphasis on the goal - peace of mind for the user, and not beefing up the security. After reading through a few discussions here about client side hashing of passwords, I'm ...
9
votes
2answers
778 views

BCrypt's 72-character limit and using it as a general digest algorithm

Goal: have token/cookie-based authentication that doesn't require keeping sessions on the server TL;DR: What, if any, is the accepted mechanism to work around the 72-character limitation of BCrypt? ...
16
votes
1answer
3k views

How to apply a pepper correctly to bcrypt?

Update: There is a better way to add a server side key, than using it as a pepper. With a pepper an attacker must gain additional privileges on the server to get the key. The same advantage we get ...
5
votes
3answers
2k views

bcrypt: random salt vs computed salt

I'm pretty new to the whole password hashing business, so I might be missing something obvious. I was looking at the bcrypt algorithm, in particular BCrypt.Net, and I was wondering if it wouldn't be ...
10
votes
1answer
1k views

Insecure versions of crypt hashes

I read at crackstation not to use these variants of bcrypt* ($1$, $2$, $2a$, $2x$, $3$),but I've used bcrypt ($2a$) in various sensitive implementations recently. Can any security expert clarify why ...
1
vote
0answers
130 views

Recomended hash algorithm [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How to securely hash passwords? Do any security experts recommend bcrypt for password storage? What would you choose between: PBKDF2 SHA256 (270,000 iterations) ...
2
votes
2answers
377 views

Scrypt + Bcrypt = cascade hashing

I've read here that hashing with differents algorithms would be a good idea. Can you confirm that? In your experience, is it useful and safe? Does it entail any security holes?
6
votes
2answers
955 views

Production ready bcrypt implementation for .NET

Which, if any, .NET / C# bcrypt implementations are considered suitable for production environments? I have seen CryptSharp and BCrypt.Net mentioned in answers to other questions but without any ...
5
votes
3answers
558 views

Trying to understand password hashing

I am trying to get a grasp of password hashing. Back in the days it seemed so simple, just MD5(password + salt) and you are done. Then md5 was proven to have collisions so people started moving to ...
3
votes
5answers
370 views

PCI-DSS and salt storage

PCI-DSS states the following: 3.5 Protect any keys used to secure cardholder data against disclosure and misuse I have a service which stores a salted bcrypt hash of the user's PAN. Assuming the ...
-2
votes
5answers
426 views

Is this password hashing method secure?

I have made a custom hashing method to help make my users' passwords more secure if the database will be leaked. The encryption method is like this: A method takes an input of 1 character, gets the ...
8
votes
3answers
4k views

Is a HMAC-ed password is more secure than a bcrypt-ed or scrypt-ed password?

Given an option , which one should I choose , a HMAC for storing a password securely or a bcrypt or scrypt library?
5
votes
3answers
602 views

How should I choose a difficulty factor for my password hashing function?

Assuming that I'm doing password hashing properly and using bcrypt, scrypt or PBKDF2, how should I go about choosing an appropriate difficulty factor? i.e rounds for bcrypt, iterations for PBKDF2 and ...
2
votes
1answer
99 views

What is the meaning of 'adaptative' and 'over time it can be made slower' in the context of the bcrypt algorithm?

I'm reading the wikipedia definition about bcrypt but I don't understand the meaning of 'adaptative' and 'over time it can be made slower'. Can someone explain what they mean in this situation?
21
votes
5answers
1k views

Is it possible to increase the cost of BCrypt or PBKDF2 when its already calculated and without the original password?

I just wanted to know if you can increase the cost (iterations) of those two algorithms off-line. I want to increase the cost every year of my users passwords. One solution is to recalculate them ...
4
votes
1answer
3k views

Is BCrypt enough when saving a password into a database?

In order to allow users to connect to my website, I encrypt their password using BCrypt since it is one of the slowest algorithms to decrypt (making a compromised database longer to be decrypted). ...
7
votes
1answer
865 views

Would it make sense to use Bcrypt and PBKDF2 together?

I've read various opinions about whether Bcrypt or PDBKF2 is a better key derivation hashing method. The answer seems to depend on a lot of complicated factors that are not easy to analyze. Would ...
257
votes
4answers
75k views

Do any security experts recommend bcrypt for password storage?

On the surface bcrypt, an 11 year old security algorithm designed for hashing passwords by Niels Provos and David Mazieres, which is based on the initialization function used in the NIST approved ...