1
vote
3answers
476 views

Drive-by downlad VS buffer and stack overflow attacks

Today malware is mainly spread thanks to vulnerabilities exploited in browsers and their plugins. The attackers use JavaScript to target those vulnerabilities. Two examples of such attacks are ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

Does glibc use canary checking to prevent heap buffer overflow?

Since canary is used by gcc to prevent stack overflow (e.g. -fstack-protector), I am wondering whether glibc uses canary-based approach to defend heap buffer overflow? For example, this paper proposes ...
4
votes
2answers
99 views

Heap canaries, to protect function pointers in heap objects

I'm wondering if anyone has previously proposed, evaluated, or deployed the following measure to harden systems against heap-based buffer overruns: basically, stack canaries, but applied before ...
1
vote
2answers
106 views

Heap spray against 64-bit processes - possible?

Are heap spray exploits possible, if the process we're attacking is a 64-bit process? Naively, it seems like the 64-bit address makes it difficult to mount a heap spray: to fill all (or a significant ...
1
vote
1answer
332 views

Determining the target address in a heap overflow

For a heap overflow to occur and arbitrary code to be executed, the function free() performs the step : hdr->next->next->prev = hdr->next->prev I understand that the address of ...