0
votes
2answers
86 views

Protecting against/detecting a specific Man in the Middle attack

I'm working on a specific (hypothetical) situation, where I have two client machines attempting to perform a public key exchange, via a server. There's no possibility for a direct connection between ...
2
votes
5answers
255 views

Is asymmetric encryption vulnerable to man-in-the-middle attacks?

I'm looking for ways to send private messages over a public channel, and in doing this I stumbled in asymmetric encryption, which is just perfect for what I was looking for at first - A and B ...
3
votes
1answer
262 views

What are the alternative to PKI certificates in mesh networks?

My particular problem has to do with secure communications over a mesh network (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mesh_network), in particular man-in-the-middle (MITM) attacks. The difficulty is that mesh ...
2
votes
3answers
255 views

If a MITM has your public key and you are SSH-ing through the MITM, what is the maximum attack it can perpetrate?

Firstly, let me start by saying that I am not attempting to hack anyone or anything (not that I would know how or where to begin, if I were). For illustration purposes, let's call the primary key ...
6
votes
1answer
130 views

public key distribution from a central server

I'm trying to code up a encrypted communication program. Originally I was thinking that I would use public key cryptography and then I would keep the public keys in a database where users could query ...
3
votes
3answers
275 views

Two-way secure communication using two pairs of public/private keys?

Let's say I want to create a protocol to securely communicate between two endpoints - each of the two endpoints know the other's public key and all data exchanged is encryted using one's public key ...
3
votes
2answers
156 views

In practice, does crypto software accept a *.com or or even a *. certificate?

Assuming this will be done with your own PKI, and not a public trusted CA. Considering that *.sub.domain.com is valid, and so is *.domain.com is valid, is it technically possible to issue *.com and ...
3
votes
2answers
382 views

Mitigations for Windows clients that don't support OCSP Nonces

Windows 7 clients (and older) don't support NONCES, a key feature used in securing the revocation check. Without a NONCE a MITM could replay a previously signed response and alter the validation of ...
0
votes
3answers
1k views

Firefox detected an invalid SSL certificate

February 14, 2012 UTC: Yesterday, I connected to a website of a VPN provider for which Firefox 8.0.1 on Windows 7 Ultimate x86-64 stated that its' SSL certificate is invalid. I saved the received ...