1
vote
0answers
51 views

Database row level encryption scheme

I am wanting to secure some highly sensitive data in a database. This would mean that the data needs to be encrypted and remain secure for 100 years if it were to fall into adversary hands. I also ...
3
votes
2answers
169 views

Why use PBKDF2 over multiple iterations of a another cryptographic hash function?

People often recommend PBKDF2 over using hash functions directly, but typically they compare PBKDF2 to a single unsalted hash. What advatages are there to using PBKDF2 over multiple iterations of a ...
0
votes
2answers
151 views

Any reason to use bcrypt, pbkdf2, scrpt for other things than passwords? [closed]

Let's say I want to hash some data, using SHA256, in order to prove I know something. Maybe it's my secret ID for something. In the real of passwords we have moved from hashing -> hashing+salt -> cpu ...
2
votes
3answers
118 views

Limit attempt of user login against PBKDF2

I have been tasked been tasked by my boss to change the encryption system of our web application from MD5 to PBKDF2 as MD5/SHA1 has been shown to be breakable in recent years . I argued against it ...
1
vote
1answer
146 views

How to safely use a Key Derivation Function to secure private data - need guidance

I have some secure data created in my client app which I wish to store on the server as backup for the user. The user already has a password to authenticate with the server. The password is never ...
1
vote
2answers
224 views

Do I need to salt PBKDF2 when it's used for AES encryption

If I'm using PBKDF2 to stretch a password into a suitable key for use in encryption with AES, should I be using a random salt (for PBKDF2, not the AES IV)?
7
votes
3answers
353 views

Increase the security of an already stored password hash

Right now we're using 1024 byte PBKDF2 with 256 byte user-specific salt and variable iterations. However, I would much prefer to be able to, perhaps once every year or two, to be able to flat out ...
4
votes
3answers
406 views

Client-Side Hashing to decrease value of password guessing heuristics

Yes, this is 'yet another client-side hashing' question. But, don't leave yet, I think there is some value here. I'd like to do something to mitigate the affect on the community as a whole when my ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

LastPass One Time Recovery Passwords--How?

The LastPass password manager stores One Time Recovery Passwords locally in each browser you use the plugin with: http://helpdesk.lastpass.com/account-recovery/ My question is, how can you have more ...
7
votes
4answers
1k views

Gold Standard for password hashing

I've developing a web application that will be dealing with highly sensitive information and I want to ensure the hashing of passwords is gold standard. Ideally I'd go for per-user salted SHA512 ...
3
votes
6answers
780 views

Is there a table that compares hashing algorithms by speed, relatively (machine independent)

As far as I understood*, one of the major criteria when choosing a password / salt hashing algorithm is it's speed. To prevent brute force attacks, a slower algorithm is better (and also makes it more ...
3
votes
1answer
289 views

Is there a better way to take advantage of current 'approved', 'proven', and memory/cpu-expensive algorithms while using salts and peppers?

I've read about the concepts presented in these two questions: Pre-hash password before applying bcrypt to avoid restricting password length Would it make sense to use Bcrypt and PBKDF2 together? I ...
12
votes
2answers
3k views

With PBKDF2, what is an optimal Hash size in bytes? What about the size of the salt?

When creating a hash with PBKDF2, it allows the developer to choose the size of the hash. Is longer always better? Also, what about the size of the random salt? Should that be the same size as the ...
5
votes
3answers
576 views

Trying to understand password hashing

I am trying to get a grasp of password hashing. Back in the days it seemed so simple, just MD5(password + salt) and you are done. Then md5 was proven to have collisions so people started moving to ...
7
votes
3answers
643 views

How should I choose a difficulty factor for my password hashing function?

Assuming that I'm doing password hashing properly and using bcrypt, scrypt or PBKDF2, how should I go about choosing an appropriate difficulty factor? i.e rounds for bcrypt, iterations for PBKDF2 and ...
21
votes
5answers
1k views

Is it possible to increase the cost of BCrypt or PBKDF2 when its already calculated and without the original password?

I just wanted to know if you can increase the cost (iterations) of those two algorithms off-line. I want to increase the cost every year of my users passwords. One solution is to recalculate them ...
6
votes
1answer
3k views

Does NIST really recommend PBKDF2 for password hashing?

We hesitated between BCrypt and PBKDF2 for password hashing. In many forums and blogs people say something like "In their Special Publication SP 800-132 NIST basically recommends using PBKDF2 for ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

Can the salt for PBKDF2 be a hash of the user-entered password?

I want to derive a key from a password in a client application that will be used as a master key that decrypts a data key. As far as I understand the salt should be private knowledge. Would it be ...
7
votes
1answer
873 views

Would it make sense to use Bcrypt and PBKDF2 together?

I've read various opinions about whether Bcrypt or PDBKF2 is a better key derivation hashing method. The answer seems to depend on a lot of complicated factors that are not easy to analyze. Would ...
30
votes
1answer
4k views

Are there more modern password hashing methods than bcrypt and scrypt?

This question made me start thinking about password hashing again. I currently use bcrypt (specifically py-bcrypt). I've heard a lot about PBKDF2, and scrypt. What I'm wondering is if there are any ...
61
votes
4answers
12k views

Recommended # of iterations when using PKBDF2-SHA256?

I'm curious if anyone has any advice or points of reference when it comes to determining how many iterations is 'good enough' when using PBKDF2 (specifically with SHA-256). Certainly, 'good enough' is ...