A salt is a random addition to a password to make the hashed password less susceptible to a lookup table attack

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298
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How to store salt?

Nowadays, if we expect to store user password securely, we need at least do the following thing $pwd=hash(hash($password) + salt) then store $pwd in your system instead of the real password. I have ...
124
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6answers
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Password Hashing add salt + pepper or is salt enough?

Please Note: I'm aware that the proper method for secure password storage hashing is either scrypt or bcrypt. This question isn't for implementation in actual software, it's for my own understanding. ...
175
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8answers
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Why are salted hashes more secure for password storage?

I know there are many discussions on salted hashes, and I understand that the purpose is to make it impossible to build a rainbow table of all possible hashes (generally up to 7 characters). My ...
28
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4answers
7k views

Why is using salt more secure?

Storing the hash of users' passwords, e.g. in a database, is insecure since human passwords are vulnerable to dictionary attacks. Everyone suggests that this is mitigated via the use of salts, but the ...
31
votes
4answers
6k views

What should be used as a salt?

I always hear that it is best to use salts on top of stored passwords, which then somehow gets concatenated and hashed afterwards. But I don't know what to use as a the salt. What would be a good salt?...
23
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5answers
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When hashing passwords, is it ok to use the hashed password as the salt?

I don't like this idea. But I can not come up with a technical argument against it. Can somebody explain it to me? The basic idea is: $passwd = 'foo'; $salt = hash($passwd); $finalHash = hash($passwd ...
30
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8answers
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Why would salt not have prevented LinkedIn passwords from getting cracked?

In this interview posted on Krebs on Security, this question was asked and answered: BK: I’ve heard people say, you know this probably would not have happened if LinkedIn and others had salted ...
2
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2answers
343 views

Is it a good idea to use the user's username as a salt when hashing a password like hash(username_str + password_str)?

I'm helping my friend with hashing his passwords, and I've a question - Should he use one secret string as salt for hashing or is it better to have each user its own salt for hashing? Consider these ...
10
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2answers
14k views

How weak is MD5 as a password hashing function ?

A professor told us today, that MD5 is weak. I understand his chain of thought but pointed out, that IMHO MD5 is a good way to go if you would use a long (even really long) dynamic salts and static ...
15
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6answers
5k views

Do salts have to be random, or just unique and unknown?

First of all, my motive is to avoid storing the salt in the database as plain text. As far as this question is concerned, the salt is not stored in the database. After discussion in comments and in ...
7
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3answers
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Generating an unguessable token for confirmation e-mails

I'm generating a token to be used when clicking on the link in a verification e-mail. I plan on using uniqid() but the output will be predictable allowing an attacker to bypass the confirmation e-...
74
votes
8answers
9k views

Convincing my manager to use salts

My manager says we don't need to salt our passwords because people are not likely to use the same password because they all have different native languages, in addition to the websites they are active ...
40
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7answers
3k views

“Real” Salt and “Fake” Salt

During a Q&A period at DEFCON this year, one member of the audience mentioned that we're using "fake salt" when concatenating a random value and a password before hashing. He defined "real salt" ...
14
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2answers
3k views

What are the most common password salting methods?

I learned that the Sun guys used the login name as salt for password hashing. Is this a common approach? What are the most common salt values?
5
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1answer
754 views

Perfectly Robust Hashing Scheme, or Completely Over-Engineered?

This is going to get long, so prepare. Basis of the question is, Do all these steps improve security, or am I completely overthinking the problem? Are my assumptions/thought process valid? We all ...
19
votes
2answers
7k views

How big should salt be?

I will be using scrypt to store passwords in my application. As such, I'll be using SHA-256 and Salsa20 crypto primitives (with PBKDF2). Having that in mind, how big salt should I use? Should it be ...
21
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5answers
1k views

Hashed password storage with random salt

Ever since I've been making sites that require a user to log in with a username and password I've always kept the passwords somewhat secure by storing them in my database hashed with a salt phrase. ...
15
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3answers
2k views

What is a good enough salt for a SaltedHash?

Since I'm hashing all passwords with each their own salt, is there a benefit to the salt being really random, or would an incremental counter or a guid be good enough? Also, is there a benefit of ...
5
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3answers
3k views

optimal way to salt password?

A good way to salt password? I have read a few answers related to salting password. But I started to get confused. I came across few functions people used to generate salt like: mcrypt_create_iv() ...
11
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1answer
1k views

Any risk in using the same salt for several hashes on a user?

Right now I'm storing a salt and password_hash on the users table (pretty standard stuff). The need arose to get a secure hash of another field for a user. Is there any risk in reusing the same salt ...
3
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3answers
2k views

Recompute Rainbow table with salt?

So, as I understand it, you prepend a password with salt before you hash it so that the resulting hash can't be used with a rainbow table to find the original password, as you could if the password ...
1
vote
2answers
278 views

Separate database column for salt

Is it advisable to store the salt in a separate database column or should we concatenate it together with the password? Is there any difference? I have come across implementations of both types. ...
65
votes
3answers
21k views

How can I create a password that says “SALT ME!” when hashed?

How can I create a password, which when directly hashed (without any salt) with md5 will return a string containing the 8 characters "SALT ME!". The hope is that a naive developer browsing through his ...
35
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7answers
11k views

Is salting a hash really as secure as common knowledge implies?

(I did search on this topic, but I found no complete question/answer that addressed it, or even good portions of questions that might be relevant.) I'm implementing a salt function for user passwords ...
22
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5answers
4k views

Does too long a salt reduce the security of a stored password hash?

Suppose we have passwords that are statistically 7-8 characters long. Is appending a 200 character long salt less secure than a 5 character salt, because of the similar hash function inputs? I was ...
14
votes
2answers
8k views

With PBKDF2, what is an optimal Hash size in bytes? What about the size of the salt?

When creating a hash with PBKDF2, it allows the developer to choose the size of the hash. Is longer always better? Also, what about the size of the random salt? Should that be the same size as the ...
9
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3answers
4k views

How often do two users use the same password

If no two users use the same password, then in theory salting the password hash is not needed. How often, in practice, do two users have the same password?
6
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3answers
2k views

How can salted, hashed password storage be combined with a plaintext, nonce and hash based authentication?

My understanding is as follows: To securely store a password (e.g. in a database), you use a hashing algorithm designed for this purpose (designed to be slow, e.g. bcrypt), and you use a unique salt ...
24
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4answers
2k views

In hashing, does it matter how random a salt is?

I recently had a comment made to me in an online discussion after I'd stated that randomness in a salt doesn't matter -- and I got the following response: Salts may not have to be "secure," but ...
13
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6answers
2k views

Does prepending a salt to the password instead of inserting it in the middle decrease security?

I read somewhere that adding a salt at the beginning of a password before hashing it is a bad idea. Instead, the article claimed it is much more secure to insert it somewhere in the middle of the ...
5
votes
2answers
435 views

Is there a strong reason to salt and hash passwords when password reuse is not an issue?

I am dealing with a system (in development) that uses randomly generated (not user provided), unique, strings to authenticate services that will consuming an API. Right now, these strings are stored ...
6
votes
2answers
590 views

How less secure is an encryption if we know something about the original data?

I have a number of files encrypted with a key derived from a password. In line with standard practice, I use a random salt and password and do many PBKDF2 iterations to obtain an encryption key and IV....
5
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3answers
323 views

Image file as password alternative

I seek guidance on interesting issue. Recently I've been searching for password alternatives, not because of the security, but to be more user-friendly. In one of my projects user receives 128 bits ...
0
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2answers
123 views

How do you overcome the problem of the salt being public and known by the attacker? [duplicate]

I believe that when adding a salt to the password you need to store the values so you can compute the hash again. But, what does happen if the attacker get the salt? How is it possible to add value ...