Secure Hash Algorithm is a family of cryptographic hash functions published by NIST.

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What's the hash for in ECDHE-RSA-AES-GCM-SHA?

Presumably the SHA is for deriving the AES key from the shared secret. Where else is the hash used? ECDH just does ECC (no hashing). RSA does masking and padding but this doesn't involve the ...
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1answer
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Are there any known vulnerabilities in PPTP VPNs when configured properly?

PPTP is the only VPN protocol supported by some devices (for example, the Asus RT-AC66U WiFi router). If PPTP is configured to only use the most secure options, does its use present any security ...
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create a variants of MD5

I have also asked similar q here : To create a variants of MD5, I made following changes : MD5 uses a non-linear sin(i)* pow(2,32) ----> i plane to use cos(i)*pow(2,32) Instead ...
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3answers
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Is SHA1 better than md5 only because it generates a hash of 160 bits?

It is well known that SHA1 is recommended more than md5 for hashing since md5 is practically broken as lot of collisions have been found. With the birthday attack, it is possible to get a collision ...
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3answers
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Is SHA1 weak for SSL?

I noticed that today after I scanned a site on the Qualys SSL Labs site that SSL ciphersuites which use SHA1 are now highlighted as being "Weak". It seems this has just happened; I scan sites pretty ...
3
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2answers
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Is it safe to expose an SHA1 hash of an encryption key?

Assume that party 1 and party 2 each possess a key used for AES encrypting data. Assume that the key was properly randomly generated and securely passed between them. Now I need a way for party 1 to ...
13
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3answers
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Trying to understand why signatures in root certs “are not used”?

Taken from here: Don't worry if the root certificate uses SHA1; signatures on roots are not used (and Chrome won't warn about them. Why are the signatures not used? Are not root certificates ...
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984 views

Using John the Ripper to crack SHA hash w/ partial knowledge

Group, I have a SHA1 hash that I would like to brute-force. I have knowledge of several characters before and after the password (ie, if the hash is derived from "xxxpasswordyyy", I know both xxx and ...
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Varient of MD5 and SHA [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Generating random numbers with repeated hashing, but without using a standard hash function I need a new mechanism to create Random Number Generate(RNG). In which ...