6
votes
1answer
3k views

Will double encryption increase the security of cipher vs bruteforce?

Lets say, I have a function encrypt(mes,key) where : mes = message key = key Length of key is 64bits. Lets say, that only way to crack my cipher is brute force attack. If I use ...
24
votes
5answers
2k views

How valuable is secrecy of an algorithm?

On the surface, the inadvisability of security through obscurity is directly at odds with the concept of shared secrets (i.e. "passwords"). Which is to say: if secrecy around passwords is valuable, ...
0
votes
1answer
267 views

Detecting end-state of decryption process with unknown key

Note: this question arises purely from a theoretical interest in security research. Frequently in popular fiction we see white-hat hackers decrypt secret information in a matter of seconds. While ...
36
votes
2answers
7k views

Amount of simple operations that is safely out of reach for all humanity?

Cryptographic primitives usually assert some security level given as number of operations to mount an attack. Hash functions, for example, give different security levels for collision attacks, ...
23
votes
7answers
11k views

Where can I learn cryptography/cryptanalysis the hard way, without going to school ? Any good book?

I'm not so bad at mathematics: I know what are p-list and p-combinations, I know matrix algebra, I know what a XOR is, I know how to tell if number is a prime, etc: I'm not the programmer who hates ...
5
votes
4answers
347 views

What is the solution to Schneier's Law?

Schneier's law (which should probably be called Babbage's Law). States that: Anyone, from the most clueless amateur to the best cryptographer, can create an algorithm that he himself can't ...