38
votes
6answers
6k views

Unix execute permission can be easily bypassed. Is it superfluous, or what's the intention behind it?

The unix read permission is actually the same as the execute permission, so if e.g. one process has write access it's also able to execute the same file. This can be done pretty easily:First this ...
1
vote
4answers
120 views

Why can't just any program use his own file-system-access-system?

This may sound stupid for everyone who knows more than me about the UNIX-System and security in software: Imagine you have a program trying to cause harm by deleting files. You just do something like ...
0
votes
3answers
2k views

Are file permissions set in Unix/Linux effective in Windows or Any other OS?

Consider some files and folder in Unix/Linux OS which are configured for only read access by root, if the hard drive stolen, and used in Windows Environment, are these permissions are still effective? ...
2
votes
5answers
1k views

Security purpose of asking admin password to mount partition on Linux

So I divided my 250GB laptop drive into 2 partitions and some swap. On the second partition which is an ext4 60GB partition I installed Fedora 17. On the other bigger NTFS partition I've got Win XP ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Is the mount manpage saying nosuid *is* secure, or is *not*?

I'm a bit confused about the description of nosuid in the mount manpage on this RedHat system I'm setting up: nosuid Do not allow set-user-identifier or set-group-identifier bits to take ...
5
votes
3answers
229 views

Could browsers improve security of stored passwords by using setuid?

On Unix-esque systems, Mozilla Firefox stores a users' preferences, web history and stored passwords in a set of files that are readible and writeable by that particular user. This makes sense: when ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

What are the dangers of storing webserver temp files in the /tmp/ folder?

I have configured my first publicly accessible nginx server. I have configured it to use a /tmp/nginx folder to store temp files. This includes the body of http requests, proxy files etc. The /tmp ...
7
votes
3answers
626 views

What prevents this exploit from working (unix SUID)?

If I have a user on a unix system where Im allowed to create new files, what prevents me from downloading an executable file onto that system which is already SUID'ed to root on a different system? ...