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94

The file and folder/directory permissions on an operating system are managed and enforced by... you guessed it right, that operating system (OS). When the operating system is taken out of the picture (booting a different operating system), then those permissions become meaningless. One way to think of it: You hire a big bodyguard (OS) to protect your house. ...


68

No, there's no way to do it. Without setting connection parameter limits, there's even no way to make it relatively difficult. If a legitimate user can access your website, they can copy its contents, and if they can do it normally with a browser, then they can script it. You might setup User-Agent restrictions, cookie validation, maximum connections, and ...


49

At every place I have worked (as a contract developer) developers are given local admin rights on their desktops. The reasons are: 1) Developers toolsets are often updated very regularly. Graphics libraries, code helpers, visual studio updates; they end up having updates coming out almost weekly that need to be installed. Desktop support usually gets ...


47

The problem isn't with this situation in particular. Let's assess the situation here: You're a trustworthy person to them The password is very likely securing trivial data Giving you the password isn't that big of a deal in this case. The problem (like you stated in your question) is that getting him in the habit of giving out passwords. I'd definitely ...


37

The answer to your question is that it depends on a number of factors. What disk encryption product is in use? Does it make use of full disk encryption, or does it just encrypt parts of the disk (e.g. the users home directory) Are there any known vulnerabilities in the disk encryption product in use? What strength of password was used by the user of the ...


36

Most probably the blocker is designed to let images through, maybe because they are hotlinking some images on the page where they ask for you to login. Appending ?.jpg to the URL makes the blocker think that the URL is an image. On the other hand, anything after the ? doesn't change the actual webpage requested, it only changes the GET headers. (so ...


35

MAC filtering is not a part of the 802.11 spec, and is instead shoved into wireless routers by (most) vendors. The reason why it's not a part of the 802.11 spec is because it provides no true security (via kerckhoff's principle). In order for wireless to work, MAC addresses are exchanged in plaintext (Regardless of whether you're using WEP, WPA, WPA2, or ...


32

You have covered the main ones. In short: it's very hard, if not impossible, to effectively block a site you want. You can make it hard by using the techniques you've mentioned: blocking IPs, redirecting DNS, blocking HTTP requests to certain sites / containing certain keywords. These methods are thwartable by proxies (in the case of deep packet ...


32

Yes. With a cold boot attack. Depending on the software used to encrypt your data and when the attacker gets a hold of your laptop, there is a good chance that they can get access to whatever they want, if they know how. The problem lies in the fact that many disk-encryption tools, including BitLocker, store the keys in RAM. The trick to the attack is to ...


31

RBAC (Role based access control) is based on defining a list of business roles, and adding each user in the system to one or more roles. Permissions and privileges are then granted to each role, and users receive them via their membership in the role (pretty much equivalent to a group). Applications will typically test the user for membership in a specific ...


29

"Linux" (as some aggregate of all the installations) typically has quite a bit more than just a password denying external access. First, there's a uniform set of discretionary access controls: read/write/execute permissions, for user/group/everybody else. Traditionally, these permissions are actually used, rather than ignored and/or worked around. ...


27

This issue has come up on a couple SE forums already, so most of this is going to just be echoing my existing answers. How can I prevent someone from accessing a Windows XP system via boot disk? How to secure my Windows 7 PC? A couple of fairly major issues exist here, which are really working against you: Unless there's something you haven't mentioned, ...


25

Protect the part of the site you want to protect with a username and password. Then only assign a username and password to people who sign an NDA, (or similar) that says they won't extract or copy information from your site. Another trick is to make all your content load from AJAX... and make the AJAX data URL load from paths that change (such as ...


24

DRM works pretty well for anything that you do not hand out to the users. Let's take Second Life as example. Second life is an 3d online game in which avatars are rather simple on their own in the sense that they cannot do anything beside moving around and using objects. Objects consists of a shape and texture, and they may contain scripts. Those scripts ...


23

As has @Adnan already pointed out in his answer, there is really no way of stopping a determined person from copying snapshots of your website. I used the word snapshots here, because that's what such content scrapers (or harvesters) are really copying. They don't (or at least shouldn't) have access to your backend where your website contents are actually ...


20

This partly depends on the kind of software the dev team is expected to develop. Some types of software are easier to develop without administrative rights than others. For example, you can do a fair amount of web-based Java development using the likes of Eclipse with Maven artifacts, all installed locally (and typically tested on port 8080), without ...


19

I'd suggest plan B to him, but not push it if he doesn't want to bother. You will have unsupervised physical access to the laptop - unless there's a disk encryption password you haven't mentioned, that's almost certainly enough for you to do whatever you want without any account passwords anyway, including installing backdoors for later remote access, and ...


17

Let me preface what will probably be a longish answer with "There is no simple solution". Solving this will take some strategic work (which is why I recommended not moving this to SF). Now I will explain why. Windows, at its core, is mostly based on the DAC model of access control. Everything in the OS is securable with an ACL - files, folders, ...


17

None of the reasons you've given are valid reasons for escrowing your password. There's only a couple valid reasons for escrowing any sort of "authenticator" information. A couple others have touched on these, but I'll try to clarify a bit. Encryption Keys: It makes absolute sense for the organization to have access to escrow copies of your encryption ...


16

Edit 2: Since this has been migrated to Security.SE, I should probably preface this with with: I'm not a professional cryptographer, and there are many, many reasons why you should never roll your own security. Having said that: It's a form of challenge-response authentication (with different challenges being sent each time). The algorithm to find the ...


15

In computer security, they are used interchangeably. In the context of rights, permission implies consent given to any individual or group to perform an action. Privilege is a permission given to an individual or group. Privileges are used to distinguish between different granted permissions (including no permission.) A privilege is a permission ...


15

Everything the human user sees, he can record. As @Adnan points out, this is rather easy, and can be automated. However, some sites still have some relative success at deterring mass slurping. Consider, for instance, Google Maps. Many people have, occasionally, tried to recover high-definition maps of large areas through scripting. Some have succeeded, but ...


13

IBAN are used to identify a recipient. The check digits enable the sending bank (or its customer) to verify the validity of a routing destination and account number from a single string of data at the time of data entry. To be able to send money from your account to another account, someone needs to impersonate your identity. I doubt your bank would ...


13

Because Windows only shows you what they think you should see, and other operating systems don't necessarily care and just show you what's on the disk. That is the gist of it. It's not a Microsoft conspiracy; Microsoft protects Windows' system files from being damaged this way. You can access it if you know some fairly sophisticated tricks and manage to run ...


13

If your computer ONLY has password for user accounts then extremely easily. You could just load ANY LiveCD and it will ignore the file permissions thus giving the attacker full file rights. If you have encryption then question is too broad scope we need to know what software you used for encryption and so on. I can expand on my answer if you provide ...



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