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What level is it aimed at? Beginner? How much have you been taught on the course? Easy: Set up a listening netcat on port 4444 with a bash shell on it. (netcat -lvp 4444 -e /bin/bash) The way for the attacker to find this would be by using nmap to scan all the open ports. Medium: Use a "known vulnerable" bit of software listening on a port. Older versions ...


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Backdoor for what? Future network exploitation or privilege escalation from the console? why not put a password and a shell on some system account that nobody will notice -- for example change /etc/passwd: from: news:x:9:9:news:/var/spool/news:/usr/sbin/nologin to: news:x:9:9:news:/var/spool/news:/bin/bash and sudo passwd news Don't make news a ...


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Setup proper 802.1X authentication / WPA-Enterprise to connect to the network. So each client will have their own credentials and they'll be logged accordingly. VPN could also be set up in the same manner if you need remote access. All of these protocols are designed with security in mind and thus inherently prevents any form of MITM attacks if implemented ...


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If you want to ensure you have your employees taking to you, and not some third party, you need to create a set of keys you distribute securely, and the tool you use depends on both ends having keys. Some few VPNs may do that, but not many. I think ssh can do so.


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You don't clarify if the site you are accessing has applied access control measures prior to accessing the document. if an authentication token is present and you access the page and served via secure connection it would be less of an issue


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I would say: A long random url is essentially a password. So its still a adequate access Control. Compare for example going to http://www.example.org/login.php and typing username=admin password=somelongrandompassword, or simply going to http://www.example.org/login.php?login=admin-somelongrandompassword Yes, there is some attack methods that did not ...


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Assuming you run the web server as its own user, then only root and that user can read your OS Environment Variable. Unless you're using 30 year old AIX or something. Even Windows protects envvars. If you encrypt the values, how are you going to secure the key? The key could be read by the user or root too. If you store the values in a file, how is that ...


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You have to distinguish between the account used to connect to the database and the original user's account: the service account used to connect the application to the database should be used to constrain access to those schemas and tables that are to be accessed. The service account should focus on security aspects such as preventing DROP or CREATE TABLE ...



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