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0

I dodn't find a good way to filter permissions on my iPhone, but I can help you for the Android. I use two apps on my tablet. the first is DroidWall which I use to stop Internet connection for most of the apps, To restrict permissions of the apps, the best app for me is XPrivacy . When you download app it just shows 1-3-10 permissions to give access, but ...


0

No, you can not do that legally. If you want to be sure, you can use a packet analyzer like Wireshark. Or you can also use Anti-virus/Privacy tool or Phishing detectors. You can check the code of application. At last, you can also switch off your internet to see the error message and confirm which link could not be loaded(or if it loads without error, that ...


0

You are correct that in general, a XSS attack is more a server level attack. Someone fills in a form or posts data to a server, the server accepts that data and fails to sanitise it. The data is tored, potentially with embedded javascript or redirects or links to remote objects with malicious payloads. Someone else visits the site and retrieves the data ...


5

(Difficulty: Incredibly Easy): If you're in Developer Mode, many of the restrictions in place to keep you safe are missing. This makes it easy for developers to test apps, but makes the device incredibly insecure. Thankfully, turning on Developer Mode is non-trivial in newer versions of Android (just a few years ago, it was not much more than a checkbox in ...


1

Buffer overflows, as mentioned, are not possible in Java. There are Java (byte) arrays that more or less directly map to memory, but all array access is bounds checked (throwing an IndexOutOfBoundsException if anybody is reading beyond the limits. This is a runtime check of course. Note too that Java has references instead of pointers (NullPointerException ...


1

An Android client application should not be vulnerable to CSRF attacks (except for a browser application like Chrome, but it is not the application here that is vulnerable, it is the website being browsed). This is because for an CSRF to succeed, the client needs to be able to send cookies to the vulnerable website. An Android application would only access ...


0

Most of the Android applications are written in Java. As long as you don't use native code, it's not possible to cause buffer overflow or memory corruptions. In android it's possible to use native code and compile them using Android NDK [1]. Applicqtions like Firefox and Chrome are using native codes. Many opensource libraries can be compiled for android ...


3

Android is similar to other operating systems, if you code in Java then you shouldn't be worried about buffer overflows but if your code contains native code e.g. C++ or C, then you should avoid any possible buffer overflow vulnerabiliy. The instructions to avoid BOF in Linux can apply for android too, so you can use them. ...


1

Java protects you from buffer overflow provided you don't call native methods (reference).


2

The generic answer for "is my code vulnerable to directory traversal?" is to ask yourself if your code: Uses filename strings that you got from an untrusted source to read/write files on disk? "Untrusted sources" could be direct user input, things you read from files (which could have been tampered with), or from 3rd party code that your code interacts ...


0

SQLite supports prepared queries and bound parameters, so the issue is more with the use of the tool, rather than the tool itself. If query parameters are used it's impossible to inject SQL into the process because the data is handled separately from the statement. The issue only arises if the developer has done something like: SQLStatement = "select * ...


1

SQL injection attacks apply when an application uses SQL and carelessly assembles SQL requests with attacker-provided elements. Here, "carelessly" means "without using prepared statements". Prepared statements are the correct way to do SQL with externally provided data; many developers try to think of it in terms of "escaping quoting characters", which is a ...


0

According to "Security Analysis of Android Factory Resets" "We recovered Google tokens in all devices with flawed Factory Reset, and the master token 80% of the time. Tokens for other apps such as Facebook can be recovered similarly. These two alternative partial solutions from Hacker News (can't find original source) Remotely wiping the smartphone ...


0

As said by @schroeder, a malware/spyware alerting the user with a beep pretty much nullifies its purpose. Probably what you hear is a alert/notification sound, so you should disable it. See also here: https://forums.motorola.com/posts/bb23abb559


3

I don't know for you but I always felt like Android especially is not safe. Is somebody - the government or other - able to listen to my microphone, or access my hard drive remotely? Why do you think Android might be especially vulnerable? I expect the NSA has the tools to snoop in on practically anything connected to the Internet. I'm wondering if ...


5

The easiest way to understand the vulnerability is to look at the diff, dig through the code, and work out how you might exploit it. The vulnerable method's signature looks like this: status_t GraphicBuffer::unflatten( void const*& buffer, size_t& size, int const*& fds, size_t& count) { The important arguments here are void ...


1

While I'm unfamiliar with this specific vulnerability, I can answer this question in general. What exactly does this mean: A remote user can send specially crafted data to trigger an integer overflow in GraphicBuffer::unflatten() This does not mean that a remote attacker can somehow make a remote procedure call on GraphicBuffer::unflatten. It means ...


0

There have been some reports of hacked SIM communications before, like the one explained in this DefCon presentation from 2012, but this is all very much on a basic level and so far there have not been any known exploits for as far as I can tell. That said, in this presentation they did show how you can load custom code on the SIM so it is not hard to ...


0

As other answers mentioned, this issue seems very close to DRM issues, with the sole but notable exception that as per my understanding you do not need the video file to be playable by any other software than your own. To avoid any stored key, I would imagine the actual key to be deduced (like a hash) from several parameters defining your restriction (video ...


1

From the Mobile Application Hacker's Handbook: Dealing with ART Android devices making use of the new Android Runtime (ART) convert DEX files into OAT files at installation time. OAT files are essentially ELF dynamic objects that are run on the device and one would assume that they would have to be treated like native code when reverse engineering them. A ...


2

On a general basis, the distinction between just-in-time and ahead-of-time compilation is not relevant to security. One can see things as performance trade-offs. For an application, that consists in a sequence of small instructions meant for the abstract sort-of-Java virtual machine: In pure interpretation, individual instructions are parsed when they are ...


2

Google has the Widevine DRM mechanism (Video DRM solution). A tool that can play with the Widevine internals (libwvcdm) can be found here -- https://github.com/EiNSTeiN-/chromecast-widevine-tools There is also the Stagefright multimedia framework to supply DRM -- https://source.android.com/devices/media.html -- Josh Drake is doing a prezo on it at BlackHat ...


2

The easiest way to do this is to run a debugging/security web proxy like Burp Suite, Charles, or Fiddler on a machine, and then set the Android phone to use that proxy. Most apps will obey the device proxy rules, and you can see the host and, if not using HTTPS, the full URL. If it is using HTTPS, you will also need to install the proxy's own certificate on ...


-1

This is explained by the first, second, and third immutable laws of security: If a bad guy can persuade you to run his program on your computer, it's not solely your computer anymore. If a bad guy can alter the operating system on your computer, it's not your computer anymore. If a bad guy has unrestricted physical access to your computer, it's not your ...


0

Knowing your app key doesn't give any control over your developer account or payments, it is supposed to identify the app, AFAICT. Also, XOR encryption in app code is merely obfuscation, a poor form of DRM. If they can extract the key, they might also be able to locally manipulate the app to bypass restrictions on paid features.


1

Actually there was a recent flaw found in JWTs. If you are using node-jsonwebtoken, pyjwt, namshi/jose, php-jwt or jsjwt with asymmetric keys (RS256, RS384, RS512, ES256, ES384, ES512) it will allow an attacker to create their own "signed" tokens with whatever payload they want, allowing arbitrary account access on some systems. If the JWT is stored in a ...



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