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0

Go to http://findmymobile.samsung.com/ and sign in using your Samsung account.


1

Did you visit Google Device Manager? If it is enabled, you can wee the precise device location. Also geotags of the photos may help.


1

Yes you could download the image and check the exif data. Some devices store the GPS co-ordinates as far as I know


2

Articles covering this research are, IMHO, bit overhyped. There's no "reading of user's activity from mobile screen". There's no storage of sensitive data in shared memory. Attack observes memory (de)allocations and tries to guess what screen (activity) is being shown in the app now. If something sensitive (e.g. logon form) is detected, then phishing ...


1

Practically - no. The SIM card is a computer. By design, this computer can control the mobile phone. It is possible to install new software on this computer, but if this SIM card wasn't created by you, you can't sign new software properly and it will not work. (Also sorry for my english :) There is interesting Defcon 21 video "The Secret Life of SIM Cards" ...


0

Many banking systems use some sort of additional confirmation for transactions, ie bank can send confirmation code to your mobile. Even if malicious software on your desktop would try to send your money to someone else, it doesn't have access to text messages on your mobile. However, the same type of software can have an access to both - your banking and ...


3

There are many ways to track a users location on a mobile device (I will go into how that works later). None of the tracking methods are particularly easy to spoof. It can be done but it is simply outside of the realm of the average user as it generally requires either a modified device (physically or programmatically) or external gear. Moreover, it is ...


2

Interesting question. In short I would say it is safe at least as your laptop/desktop are safe. Explanation: mobile OS are far more advanced in their security architecture than your good old windows OS is. Having said that it really depends on your device, OS and how you use it. For example devices I would consider safe without any hesitation are ...


0

Google "MITM PROXY", you will find a lot of tools. One example is: http://mitmproxy.org/ With cell phones, MiTM attacks are multi-route, so you have to sometimes do some pretty technical set up of environments to completely cover all the paths. Remember you have 3g/4g, sms/mms, wireless, NFC, BT/BTLE. Of course if you are using just the emulator, then you ...


0

Android phones will always suffer from "hacks" and should be (unless you roll your own secure ROM and deal with the vendor tripwires of installing it) considered "insecure" to "less-than-ideal" secure devices. If you are vigilant and secure your device; keep it up to date; go to few web sites; and don't install any apps you aren't very certain are safe you ...


1

For Ingress, Google's global wargame, a range of anti-spoofing measures are used. Google are keeping quiet about the full range, but two that have been demonstrated are: Speed limitation: 40mph maximum allowed in game Corroborating measures: cross referencing wifi SSID's received with their location database


0

The short answer is that (as far as I'm aware) it isn't possible to perfectly stop location emulation on open platforms (e.g. Android). Other more restrictive platforms (e.g. non-jailbroken iOS/Windows Phone) don't tend to suffer as much from these problems as they don't allow users the same level of freedom in terms of the types of applications they can ...


0

From my knowledge the way you spoof the locations is to : 1) Use developer mode with mock locations. There are ways of detecting that you are using developer mode so the developer can decide that the GPS is not to be trusted in this case. So they will use other ways of finding your location like wifi networks. 2) You can fake your position when your phone ...


0

A quick search on the internet shows that most banking apps have some kind of flaw. Altho most testers only tested the app itself and not the back-end servers or services (this would need approval from the bank), even here they find that some basic security measures haven't been applied. Some examples are targeting for older Android versions where ...


-2

I would say older Android phones (2.3 and 4.0) and all iOS phones are extremely unsafe. Such older phones do not receive security patches. You don't need a 0-day exploit when the OS hasn't been updated in 3 or 5 years. The Snowden leaks included one little tidbit: 100% of iOS devices are crackable. To mitigate the risks, I install banking apps on my ...


0

If the app opens the payment page within the app, there is no way of knowing whether this is actually a HTTPS secured page or whether it is an unsecure site or even just part of the app itself which may grab your details and send them off to the malicious developer of the app. The same goes for apps that ask for your Facebook details in order to login. At ...


0

When it comes to theory the app can know your password and also your CC number for HTTPS , they may be using SSL which is just another saying of HTTPS . everything i said is theoric so it can be th case with your app and it can not be , i assumed the worst case .


0

I have found the answer to my own question on another stack question: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/11698979/how-to-change-android-usb-connect-mode-to-charge-only The Solution Go to Settings Select Storage under Device Select "USB computer connection" from the drop down menu Disable MTP and PTP


1

It is unlikely that you are getting spam because you used a hotspot. Gmail should have their certificate pinned and their traffic should be https only, so there is no way to intercept it unless you install 3rd party certificates on the phone, or accept any warnings about invalid certificates. Spammers also do not need access to your account to send you ...


1

For legal issues regarding the data, you need to read the android terms of Use. There is probably a section on law enforcement. as far as where the data is: On my google account one of the sync options is called "AppData".


0

TextSecure (FOSS), Wickr, Telegram, ChatSecure (Gibberbot, previously) (FOSS), Threema, Just to name a few of the big names.


1

Telegram is a texting app whose "secret chats" supposedly run on public key encryption or at least Diffie-Hellmann key exchange to use encryption. Other than that, I don't really know about something similar that has actually taken off. The problem with encryption is that your ordinary person still doesn't consider themselves affected by the massive number ...



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