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1

Currently, Android's device encryption uses dm-crypt and indeed seems to be susceptible to the kind of brute-force attack you mention, because the PIN/password is more or less directly used to derive the key that decrypts the AES key stored in the volume header. To protect against such brute-force attacks, the password has to be of sufficiently high entropy ...


2

I have run the official test script on my Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 and it indicates it is vulnerable. This device was just out of the box and has not been rooted.


3

Both dhclient and dhcpcd call configuration scripts that invoke a system shell, so they are vulnerable. However, based on my testing it looks like you can run at least dhcpcd successfully without the config script (if you rename/move the script): $ pkill dhcpcd $ ping -c 1 www.google.com ping: unknown host www.google.com $ mv ...


7

Yes. The dhclient-script network-configuration shell script is run during the DHCP process, and a number of parameters from the server (such as domain-name) are passed to it in environment variables. The script is set to be interpreted by /bin/sh, so if your system has that symlinked to /bin/bash (which is quite common), you're vulnerable. What's more, on ...


7

Not out-of-the-box. I know of no Android or iOS device running a bash shell. Some people might, on their rooted devices, but that will be only a few.


2

Disk encryption only protects your phone when it is turned off (i.e., it protects data at rest). Once the device is turned on, data is decrytped transparently, and (at least with the current implementation) the decryption key is available on memory. While Android uses the device unlock PIN/password to derive the disk encryption key, the two are completely ...


2

Firstly I admit I have not tested it myself, but according to http://nelenkov.blogspot.de/2012/08/changing-androids-disk-encryption.html the disc encryption password is also changed, when the device password/pin is changed. As the device password can be reset in a variety of ways, firstly you can access the already unlocked data (assuming the device is ...


3

Android encryption uses dm-crypt which, used the right way, can protect the device from law enforcement. However, there are several issues: The password needs to be distinct from any password you use. Any party you give your password in a login has usually full text access at least the time you log in, and it is possible they store it in a retrievable way. ...


1

Yes. Much of android malware applications simply abuse the api and claim to do one thing (eg an innocent game) but then do malicious activities (subscribe to premium sms, without root). Any application that makes use of WebViews and allow for javascript execution open themselves up to standard javascript attacks(XSS). In fact recently a vulnerability was ...


0

I had a similar issue (but with calls to POTS lines) on my last android handset and couldn't resolve the issue with a factory reset ... so I returned it for a replacement from the store, it was well over a year old but apparently still covered by the manufacturer's warranty. The store clerk may be reluctant to replace your device if you can't replicate the ...


0

This proposed security system is vulnerable to CWE-602: Client-Side enforcement of server-side security, and does not limit an attacker's ability to access this RESTful API. Fundamentally, any secret provided to the mobile app will be known by the attacker. An attacker with a jail-broken phone can observe memory used by any running process. It must be ...


0

I haven't used android emulator but have used Fiddler to debug traffic on an iPad.


-1

The anti-virus apps you get from GooglePlay, is most likely made to protect against apps from outside the GooglePlay store (also know as APK packages). We're now writing 2014, and it's starting to get really ugly on the Android platform. There's COUNTLESS "APK" installer packages that just downloads automatically to your phone/tablet if you enter the wrong ...


0

Let's not forget the power of download mode, particularly on devices that are a little to old to have a locked bootloader. Take a Galaxy S2 for example, it would take me about 5mins to put it in download mode, flash a custom kernel+recovery, reboot in recovery and delete the lock code via adb. Of course, that wouldn't help much if you had encrypted your ...


0

The only thing that makes me wary in this situation is that Revolution is closed source. Especially since it can access your NAND flash storage with no restrictions, and in light of this who really knows what it's doing. Now, you can also look at this through a different lens. ClockWork is a less popular version of Android. With a less popular version, ...


0

The user doesn't need to rely on Google. They can also use the amazon marketplace or the developer can send the .apk directly to the user.


1

Signing applications removes the reliance on Google for anything other than providing the operating system. A user can install an apk and verify its signature, regardless of whether this apk is downloaded from Google or e.g. copied over an SD card. Once an apk is downloaded, there is no direct way to track its origin. It's impossible to tell afterwards what ...


3

Actually, code signing is simply a way to validate that an app came from the app store. It has nothing directly to do with who the app is from or what intent the app designers had in mind. The issue of malware being introduced is mostly the result of it not being caught by Google's filters (see wiki for details authentication procedures). Moreover, code ...


2

Normally on recent phones I have observed that /data and /mnt/sdcard is encrypted using dm-crypt which does block level encryption and external sdcard is encrypted using eCryptfs which does file-level encryption refer comments in this method -http://androidxref.com/4.4.4_r1/xref/system/vold/cryptfs.c#1587 Technically it is possible to encrypt sdcard ...


0

If the app's malicious payload copies itself to other apps or documents on the device, it is a virus. If the app spreads itself to other devices, but does not do so by "infecting" legitimate apps or documents, it is a worm If the app relies on a human to install it, and then does some nasty stuff besides simply replicating itself, it is a trojan Since ...


1

HTTPS + certificate pinning seems like an obvious route.



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