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1

Requirement 2: Opt-in revealing of name and email Option 2 can easily be done without your server having to always remember UserId & user's email: When the user wants to post a non anonymous message, the user supplies his name and email address. If identity sproofing is a problem the user can keep a certificate proving that he owns the given username ...


1

If I understand you right than you want to make sure that no user data are compromised even if your site gets hacked. First you should be clear that this only can apply if you detect hacks to your site. If the attacker manages to hack your site and you don't notice this then the attacker can track all activity on this site and probably de-anonymize the users ...


0

Can exit nodes eavesdrop on communications? Isn't that bad? Yes, the guy running the exit node can read the bytes that come in and out there. Tor anonymizes the origin of your traffic, and it makes sure to encrypt everything inside the Tor network, but it does not magically encrypt all traffic throughout the Internet. Also, JavaScript is enabled ...


0

Appart from the "100% anonymity" from your title, which seem to include government agencies and can therefore never be 100% ensured, as long as the "online communities" are concerned some of them implement special policies regarding Tor's exit nodes IPs. For instance you can check Wikipedia where by default Tor's users are prevented from editing articles to ...


0

If a user has good trade craft and implements good tor hygiene by doing all the things you listed, it would be very hard to UID them..if not impossible. I know one of the most common methods that is emerging is pattern recognition that can analyze things like how a user types and then UID them from that, but that relies on things like javascript so if it is ...


1

ToR and associated products (e.g. Tails) provide a technological capability which will, if used consistently, allow certain actions to be taken online without any easy way to track them back to the person executing them. So it's likely that the weak point in an anonymous browsing setup will be the person operating it. Good Operational Security (OpSec) ...


2

First of all, it is important to keep enough bits from the start of the address that it will still be clear which class of address it is. How many bits are needed in order to know that does however depend on which class of address it is. Here are a few examples: 2001:0:xxxx:xxxx:: a Teredo address - 32 bits (two groups of digits) is enough to know it is a ...


5

Paying for VPS's is pointless in the quest for anonymity since there is a payment trail leading back to you... Unless bitcoin is used, which is questionable at the moment. I suggest you look at a TOR project called Tails. Its a read only, live bootable only operating system that is completely configured to route any internet access via TOR only and forgets ...


1

People can still trace you with other methods. Just because your IP is different and your traffic is encrypted in a tunnel doesn't mean you can't be tracked. There are other ways people can track you. For example: they can find who you are by doxing your IP isn't the only thing that identifies you on the internet your VPN service can see your IP and what ...


2

You can post your unique local unicast address since they are pretty much the same as a IPv4 private address. It has the prefix fc00::/7 (fd00::/8). However I don't suggest you to post your IPv6 public address, especially in a network expert forums. You can try to abstract your question by making reference to its components (Network Identifier or EUI - ...


1

I start off by giving general cases, but then use specific examples for each case. Protecting Personal Information: Virtual Private Networks ("VPNs") and proxies are most commonly used to encrypt traffic and hide one's IP address. There are two main reasons why others would want to use them: To access or use a service that would not normally be ...


1

Appropriate audiences is the right phrase to use. Certainly some missives are more appropriately cast in a manner that would make them palatable to the listener. The interaction between a group of two is entirely different from a crowd of thousands. Similarly, would you like to know that the doctor who treats your disease had a teenhood that encompassed ...


2

I would like to quote Edward Snowden on this: Arguing that you don’t care about the right to privacy because you have nothing to hide is no different than saying you don’t care about free speech because you have nothing to say. Just because you have nothing to hide (you likely do, but let's assume you are really OK with your government, foreign ...


4

For the fraud and "identity theft" angle on this, people should remember that dealing with it always takes someone's time and money. Identity theft can be extremely inconvenient or expensive, and your time is not usually covered by insurance. Another angle is price discrimination. "We see you have $1234.50 in your bank account, therefore the price of this ...


22

Positive reasons Instead of a beach holiday, we joined a Christian Mission this summer in Malawi. We're keeping quiet about it in case the children are teased at school. I leapt into the road and saved a toddler's life. I just walked away because I don't want any fuss. Controlling dissemination My wife is pregnant, great news! We want to tell close ...


11

Just to address one point: Credit card insurance protects them from fraud This makes several assumptions, none of which are to be relied on: You assume that the insurance will pay out. It would be safer to assume that the insurer will try to avoid paying out, and require you to prove that you didn't give away your card details. This may be tricky if ...


1

One of the reasons to guard your privacy is that whilst the government is doing its best (ehem) to protect you from criminals, the latter also have methods to get the information about you, wire-tap your phones, and eavesdrop your communications. There are powerful crime syndicates out there that have the technical abilities of law enforcement. And this is ...


27

There's a great short essay written by Bruce Schneier on the right of privacy: The most common retort against privacy advocates -- by those in favor of ID checks, cameras, databases, data mining and other wholesale surveillance measures -- is this line: "If you aren't doing anything wrong, what do you have to hide?" Some clever answers: "If ...



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