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6

I see two possible uses for this even with logging disabled: A user violates some other part of the ToS, for example by paying for their account using a stolen credit card. An operator of a website which is targeted by a user's illegal activities contacts the VPN provider, and the VPN provider sees that the connection to that website is still open so it ...


6

Claim to "not log" is not the same as "not monitor connections". First is saving traces, second is analyzing activity when it happens, that does not necessary generates logs. However, while not totally clear, I understand they claim to not monitor too: NordVPN does not monitor, store or record logs for any VPN user. They do not monitor logs (since ...


-3

You're right, if they really do not log anything, it's impossible. There could be two reasons for this: They do actually log something It's just for legal reasons. Personally, I'd be wary of such contradictions, but ymmv.


1

If you mean the anonymity from the point of view that someone else can say that it was actually the user the one who asked with an anonymous user, then that's completely irrelevant. I can put a bounty in a question if I find it interesting enough and it's not receiving answers (or good answers). If you mean anonymity in the sense that someone else can say ...


3

The EFF's "Surveillance Self Defense" is a good place to start. https://ssd.eff.org/en Over time leaks and mistakes are likely; generating a new identity regularly may make sense if you think that you'll come under intense scrutiny. You reduce linkability between the things you've said, and thus reduce tracability. Overestimating threats is never a ...


0

According to your scenario the network provider (and ISP) is able to determine that you are using Tor. This might raise a flag which could initiate technical (e.g. IP blocking) or organizational processes (e.g. questioning). There are technical approaches to de-anonymize Tor traffic (to identify the involved peers). Furthermore there are attacks against the ...


133

A good option is to harden your Content Security Policy. It allows you to fine-tune which resources the browser will load/run, and is supported by most browsers. Consider the following header: Content-Security-Policy: default-src 'none'; img-src 'self'; style-src 'self'; This tells the browser to disable scripts, frames, connections and any other objects/...



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