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Most common way of determining the proxy is by analyzing the headers such as HTTP_VIA, HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR, or HTTP_FORWARDED (which you've already mentioned). At least, almost all web based proxy detection applications such as this and this analyze these headers to detect whether or not the request has came from a proxy. Try visiting those web applications ...


1

First you look at the ingress part of the data. Fundamentally you put whatever sticks into the stream. Like modifying cookies or layer 6/7 session header injection. Later, you look at the egress packets. It doesn't matter that the connections are over an opaque cloud. In fact, i think one can correlate the outgoing sets of packets from the origin host to ...


0

Well for the best anonymity in my opinion, I'd go with using obfuscated bridges with Tor ->VPN->Tor(or i2p)->virtual machine VPN chain linking using Whonix then Tails. The reason for this is that Whonix virtualizes the gateway, so as to prevent your IP from being compromised by the workstation for whatever reason (malware installed through a browser attack ...


0

In order to provide a service like (and actually have it be commercially used) there needs to be participation between multiple parties. The only way I can see this working is if there is a centralized key server that would act as the "Bob" and "Alice" of the equation. If you want to secure yourself from metadata revealing location and any forensic pattern ...


1

Anonymity from whom? Governments, or the average person you are making bitcoin exchanges with. These two differ widly. In the first (govs), anonymity is a bit more difficult since most people don't focus much on operational security (OPSEC) so little is thought about weaving together an alter ego. This means, most people are under the impression that they ...


5

This is an interesting question because it is almost entirely nontechnical. One presumes from your question that you are releasing something that would offend more than one national government. Digital Opsec Compartmentation: Only work on it using resources that are not associated to you. One cross-contamination will burn you (that is how DPR was sent up ...


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Go to some public wifi access point (e.g. some coffee shop, internet cafe, etc.), plug in your USB stick and upload it somewhere publicly available (e.g. github/sourceforge if you also want to make the source code available).


0

Hackers can be caught, Anonymous cannot. Anonymous is such a lose collective that it is not materially hurt by law enforcement striking out at its individual hackers. However, it does respond violently against any organization that attempts to do so. This means Its very hard to strike down Anonymous just by catching its members. Anonymous will make life ...


1

To be honest, I think the BEST ANSWER can be found here: Best practices for Tor use, in light of released NSA slides This guy details /everything/ in so many ways.


4

In general I'd say you need to do more than just use a VPN. What VPNs do: VPNs solve a couple of fairly specific problems: Your local ISP (Internet Service Provider) and network provider can see all your unencrypted traffic. This could be groups like your school, work place or whoever is running the WiFi[1] at your local cafe. A VPN encrypts all the ...


5

I would argue for the following definitions: Pseudonym is a fictitous name used to protect your real identity. Untraceability means that nobody is able to trace back your actions to gain any info even related to your pseudonym or real identity. Anonymity means that there is no way to identify you uniquely from any other individual (although ...


17

The distinction is subtle, but in some ways, quite important. If an action is untraceable, it's impossible to determine where it came from or who did it. This implies a level of anonymity, in that you can't name the person who carried out an action. However, it may be possible to trace an action back to a certain identity without being able to name that ...


5

It depends on what you mean by "untraceable". By definition, you can't be anonymous if adversaries can trace your actions back to your identity. However, you can remain anonymous to adversaries who can trace your actions back to your location, as long as you've moved on by the time they do that, and as long as there aren't compromising records. Conversely, ...


28

The two notions are actually different. Anonymous systems usually are untraceable as a side effect but the reverse isn't true. Consider, for instance, voting. The process is usually not anonymous: you have to prove you identity and rights to vote before you can do so and the system will keep track of how many votes you have cast. But it can also be ...


0

Using an offshore VPN can help you to hide your real identity. Every site you visit will see the IP of the VPN-Server instead of your real IP. On most VPN-Services, your IP isn't dedicated to a single user, which make it harder to identify a special customer. But this is more related to the sites you're using, because the owner of the site can see and ...


5

Using a VPN in and of itself isn't going to stop people who want to trace specific activities on-line. A VPN encrypts the traffic from your machine to the exit point of the VPN network. So what it protects you from is someone trying to look at your network traffic if they sit between you and your VPN provider (for example a correctly set-up VPN should ...


0

Running those programs themselves would be pretty safe if they really need to run as root (I'm sure they can be ran as a normal user with the correct configuration). What is definitely not secure is being logged in as root and running everything else as root, like a desktop environment or a web browser.


1

While there doesn't appear to be any existing privacy-friendly CAs at this moment, all evidence suggests that the recently-announced Let's Encrypt CA (launching summer 2015) will not require users to provide personal information. This could change, but I doubt it will given EFF's involvement. If Let's Encrypt will not collect any personal information when ...



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