New answers tagged

1

Use Tor Deep Web Email provider services OnionMail SIGAINT (No Javascript Needed) MailTor Mail2Tor You Need Tor Onion Links For All Of them just search on google and easily you find links


2

Solution 1 : There is a lot of annymous email sender through the web just do some googling here is a list providing you 20 Sites To Keep Your Identity Hidden http://www.hongkiat.com/blog/anonymous-email-providers/ if you want to receive back an answer you could use yopmail.com (no need to create an account) Solution 2 : You could setup a gmail/yahoo ...


1

Download Tor Browser Using Tor Browser, go to a site like Send Anonymous Email


-2

It is impossible to use the internet without leaking any kind of data. This is true even when you hijack someone else's wifi or use a stolen SIM card and sit behind 7 proxies. You always leave traces and you can be tracked sooner or later. The effort to remain anonymous increases exponentially with the level of anonymity up to a point where you can only use ...


-1

Generate Key - 64+ Characters Email Key Hash the key using a pre-entered 4+ Digit Pin store that hash in a database table with 2 fields the hash and a field to say if the key has been tuurned in. User clicks the link (www.website.com/link.php?KEY={KEY}) Request the user enter a pin they assigned previously then hash the key along with a provided PIN in ...


0

Your question is very general and as far as I understand, nothing more than a regular authentication plus anonymization of the data. It is definitely possible to ensure non repudiation and anonymity by pseudonymization. What you refer to is a regular access control system which is included in most common frameworks. In case you need a more enterprise ...


8

The exit node will not know your address. The principle is that every server only knows the address of the previous and the next host but never the whole path. There are three steps between your TOR browser and the webserver: Entry-Node (Knows your address and relay nodes address) Relay-Node (knows entry-node and exit-node address) Exit-Node (knows address ...


3

When you use Tor your Internet traffic is routed via Tor which goes through several random relays before exiting the Tor network. Tor is "designed" so that it is theoretically impossible to know the original computer that the information came from assuming you are using Tor the right way. Exit node can see your plaintext traffic assuming you aren't using ...


1

You could use browser fingerprinting, most browsers are unique in the plugins they use, version of those plugins, screen resolution (if you use your browser in full size) etc. You can check your browser fingerprint here


2

There is a really cool exploit named row hammer which answers your TLDR of can hardware be compromised. Yes it can. The premise of this attack is that because memory has been getting smaller and closer together to fit more memory onto a chip, the problem of DRAM cells interacting electrically with each other is now exploitable. If you access one location ...


1

The answer is yes, but if you're worried about e.g. a company like Intel doing this, the answer is almost certainly that they are not doing this on a wide scale. How do we know? Simple: for monitoring, you need communication. If your computer were to communicate with (say) the NSA, the data would have to pass through your communication channels, like your ...


2

You don't even need to hack it -- Intel now conveniently provides on-chip remote hardware access capability (AMT -- Active Management Technology) along with a documented API, so you can do stuff like reflash sleeping computers over the network.


8

Yes, it is possible, but that's already clear by now, isn't it. For instance, a hobbyist like me can implement a microcontroller-based hardware keylogger featuring a SIM card to report back via SMS or 3G wireless (similar to Amazon Whispernet). This sort of gadget must be standard issue for spying agencies around the globe, monitoring targets wirelessly. ...


16

Of course, the hardware/firmware also plays as role. The point is at the end of day, firmware also runs programs, and some controllers even provide full computing environments similar to small computers. It is no small wonder there are around projects that revolve around avoiding proprietary formats, either in binary blobs or in proprietary operating ...


33

Yes, if an attacker has physical access to your computer it is no longer your computer. While it's theoretically possible to implement spying directly in silicon on a modern CPU, a modern x86-based CPU is extremely complicated. An attacker would be better off using a peripheral device that uses something like USB which exposes certain interrupts in an ...


10

Yes. In 2013, researchers uncovered malware that resides in systems' BIOS: http://arstechnica.com/security/2013/10/meet-badbios-the-mysterious-mac-and-pc-malware-that-jumps-airgaps/ In 2015, Kaspersky Labs uncovered malware that resides in hard drive firmware: https://blog.kaspersky.com/equation-hdd-malware/7623/


0

You could send a request to a large list of websites. If you spoofed your IP address as the target IP address, then all of the websites' responses would go to the target IP address, potentially creating a DDoS. It would be distributed, because lots of servers are all sending the response.



Top 50 recent answers are included