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1

Appropriate audiences is the right phrase to use. Certainly some missives are more appropriately cast in a manner that would make them palatable to the listener. The interaction between a group of two is entirely different from a crowd of thousands. Similarly, would you like to know that the doctor who treats your disease had a teenhood that encompassed ...


2

I would like to quote Edward Snowden on this: Arguing that you don’t care about the right to privacy because you have nothing to hide is no different than saying you don’t care about free speech because you have nothing to say. Just because you have nothing to hide (you likely do, but let's assume you are really OK with your government, foreign ...


3

For the fraud and "identity theft" angle on this, people should remember that dealing with it always takes someone's time and money. Identity theft can be extremely inconvenient or expensive, and your time is not usually covered by insurance. Another angle is price discrimination. "We see you have $1234.50 in your bank account, therefore the price of this ...


18

Positive reasons Instead of a beach holiday, we joined a Christian Mission this summer in Malawi. We're keeping quiet about it in case the children are teased at school. I leapt into the road and saved a toddler's life. I just walked away because I don't want any fuss. Controlling dissemination My wife is pregnant, great news! We want to tell close ...


11

Just to address one point: Credit card insurance protects them from fraud This makes several assumptions, none of which are to be relied on: You assume that the insurance will pay out. It would be safer to assume that the insurer will try to avoid paying out, and require you to prove that you didn't give away your card details. This may be tricky if ...


1

One of the reasons to guard your privacy is that whilst the government is doing its best (ehem) to protect you from criminals, the latter also have methods to get the information about you, wire-tap your phones, and eavesdrop your communications. There are powerful crime syndicates out there that have the technical abilities of law enforcement. And this is ...


24

There's a great short essay written by Bruce Schneier on the right of privacy: The most common retort against privacy advocates -- by those in favor of ID checks, cameras, databases, data mining and other wholesale surveillance measures -- is this line: "If you aren't doing anything wrong, what do you have to hide?" Some clever answers: "If ...


2

Even if Tails offers anonymity and coming with default built-in encryption suites for different purposes, your anonymity is already compromised since as in all schools/universities we find the same policy: to use their WiFi they need to be sure you are either a student, a teacher or an authorized person to access their Wifi. Also you must remember that ...


3

There are two general categories of vulnerability to your anonymity that I would be concerned with given that setup: Using web sites that identify you (it's a moot point if you then go log into Facebook with your real name!) Traffic analysis - if your school requires login info specific to you, then the school knows who's sending the traffic, and if they ...


1

Microsoft is able to remotely push code to your machine that will be installed and executed with the system's privileges the next time Windows Update runs (a practical example of this is the new "Get Windows 10" tray icon bullshit that continuously stays running in memory). So, while they definitely won't be doing this on a large scale (eventually someone ...


2

There are a number of known vulnerabilities, that have been used, to deanonymize Tor users via leveraging JavaScript. The first major incident where this happened was with the "Freedom Hosting" seizure by the FBI. The FBI kept servers online, and then installed javascript paylods which exploited a zero-day exploit in Firefox. This caused the computers to ...


0

I believe this is to stop "browser fingerprinting". Javascript can get a lot of information, like the order that fonts are installed on a computer, the size of the screen, etc; - there is a good example at https://panopticlick.eff.org/ . If you go to another site bypassing TOR, on the same computer, then the two sites may be able to compare notes, and ...


0

In short, you only have Microsoft's promise that they won't do that. If Microsoft were to log your activity inside programs for their own purposes, they would likely come under a lot of fire for doing so, both in terms of people being angry as well as possible legal action (especially from government agencies that use Windows). I wouldn't worry too much ...


1

Tor browser prevents somebody watching your Internet connection from learning what sites you visit. It prevents the sites you visit from learning your physical location, and it lets you access sites which are blocked. This statement is valid for Microsoft Windows OS. So to answer bluntly: No. EDIT: Following your comment: As by your machine ...


-6

Tor is suposed to hide yourself, with JS you can get the IP of the computer so that's why


15

I do not know where you got that information but wherever you got it, the official documentation is more reliable: We configure NoScript to allow JavaScript by default in Tor Browser because many websites will not work with JavaScript disabled. If you disable JavaScript by default but then allow a few websites to run scripts (the way most ...


17

Crowds and Onion Routing are both used to create anonymous networks, but implemented in two different ways. Onion Routing Basic Operation Anonymous networks like Tor rely on passing through multiple nodes with a layer of encryption added at each node. This circuit is randomly predetermined when a node enters the network. As the data passes through each ...


2

I suppose onion routing as implemented by Tor is a "crowd" implementation (I believe you are referring to google sharing by Moxie and the like with crowds? - please correct me if not). Crowds in general protect your identity from the end point, in the Google Sharing example, Google, but of course you're moving that trust to another third party in most ...


1

Pros of OpenVPN: Strong encryption OpenVPN is known for having a strong encryption, which is considerably better against the NSA (National Security Agency). The OpenSSL encryption library supports a number of cryptographic algorithms including the AES which is known for almost no weakness at all. Highly reliable Besides being ...


1

As pointed out in the comments by @BadSkillz, use a spam filter. however if you really want to know more about the person who sent the email, you can look for the IP address of the sender in the Email header. more information here



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