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2

The registrar verifies the identity of the user (in a comment you said that the user is not anonymous towards the registrar). Identification means that each user has some kind of unique identifier. That could be their social security number, their real name + birthday + birthplace or something like that. The registrar uses a cryptographically secure hash ...


2

To a large extent, yes, you will lose your anonymity. Github (and anyone monitoring Github) will be able to connect your email address to your IP address. A key element of anonymity (or more technically, pseudonymity) is keeping your separate identities separate. Your Hushmail account accessed over Tor is one identity, while everything you do through ...


1

Yes. If you use an account on Tor and also use the same account not on Tor, your ownership of the account can be traced via the use not on Tor. If you link two accounts (e.g. by listing an email from Tor on a non-Tor account), someone could potentially find that link and then trace the non-Tor account. This is one of many reasons "use Tor" isn't enough to ...


1

There is no chance for fingerprint attack. The first point here is there is no unique certs as you can create and if you try to make it , you need to add digital signature in the certificate( self signed or not ), then you require private key. Its available only with the particular person. The second point here is you can't establish a secure ...


0

Like cpast mentioned Tor does not guarantee anonymity if large portion of the network by capacity (not by number of relays) is controlled by colluding advesaries. This is because one relay at 100 MB/sec capacity is effectivly is eqivalant to 100 relays at 1 MB/sec capacity. So it is the colluding adversaries's total employed data capacity to total capacity ...


8

The short answer is in comments and @msw's response. There is, literally, no way that you can use the library's (or anyone else's) systems and/or infrastructure and have a 100% guarantee of anonymity. If the system and/or network owner is determined to be able to monitor and log your activity, there is nothing you can do to prevent it except simply not use ...


3

Nope. They own the machine and the network, they can log anything you do if they wish to.


3

bonsaivikings answer does make sense for Twitter and Facebook, but Reddit doesn't really fit in there. It's not just about the audience - it's about how the audience perceives you. Anonymity has great influence on the general behavior of the whole community, which affects that perception. Users on Reddit are mostly anonymous and almost every post is public ...


15

It's not about your anonymity, but about your audience. As @darkf mentioned, Twitter doesn't have the same level of privacy settings that Facebook does. A user's tweets are either all protected or all public. This means that you have less control over your audience. A message that you meant as a sarcastic comment could be retweeted (repeated with ...


2

Twitter is publicly visible. On Facebook, your posts can be seen only by whomever you've set in your privacy settings. As for Reddit, I can only suggest anecdotally that more people talk about their real life, and add real life acquaintances, on Twitter. Reddit is a bit more detached.


1

Tor was originally created by the US Navy and DARPA in the 90s to protect online communications abroad. So there is certainly a legal use. On the other hand, it is used to break the law in many countries, like in Iran and China. Where do you live? Do you have a western viewpoint? If so, do you mind that people in Iran break the law using Tor to ...


0

Anonymity networks are designed to withstand any outside censorship or surveillance. That's their primary purpose and how well they do this is the criteria they are judged by. However, most anonymity networks theoretically allow self-censorship by blacklisting on individual nodes. Networks need to identify resources by some kind of identifier like a hash ...


14

Officially, they are pushed forward to allow people in dictatorships to break laws restricting their freedom of information and/or expression. Because, the problem with the law is, that you need some people to make it, and wherever people are involved, they try to get their beliefs into the law. As such, laws, even in so-called "democracies", are not always ...


5

It doesn't guarantee anonymity if enough of the network is controlled by a single adversary. There's no general way you can do so; if your whole connection goes entirely through adversary-run computers, your adversary is going to be able to track it, no matter what system you're using. What Tor does is make it really, really, really hard for an adversary to ...



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