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In the year 2015, most malware will spread via two mechanisms, the primary being USB (or derivative, which nearly all hardware is) and the second being TDS (often a combination of adware, parasite hosting, and blackhat SEO) via exploit kits. Yes, the second vector is over the web and the targets are browsers and browser plugins especially Java, Flash, and ...


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An antivirus program is always useful. The problem with your logic is that you're assuming that you are in control of everything that is downloaded to your machine. Using web applications will invite all sorts of different possibilities into the mix. Unknown Downloads Lots of different things are downloaded to your machine without your knowledge. I just ...


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Visiting shady websites and downloading files are common ways that a computer could get infected, but they are by no means the only ones. Drive-by downloads that exploit vulnerabilities in the browser, operating system, or plugin (Flash, Java, etc.) can infect your computer if you merely visit a malicious webpage, with no other interaction on your part and ...


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Of course, you will always need an anti malware program even if you do not download files by yourself. Why ? Because a simple visit to the most innocent website you know, may trigger an attack and install you malware (more likely spyware) that can lead even to a total control of your machine. I advice you to read about drive-by download attacks that can ...


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Is antivirus needed if a computer doesn't download files but only uses web applications? Yes, always. There are vulnerabilities in every layer of the Internet, so if you have any computer connected to it, it would be prudent to assume you are working in a contested space. AV will not catch everything, but it will catch plenty of malware with known ...


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An antivirus may help against malware that exploit vulnerabilities to install themselves without user interaction, like browser vulnerabilities, PDF viewer ones, Flash player or Java plugin ones, in which case the antivirus would prevent the payload from executing. This of course assumes the payload is already known to the antivirus, which isn't the case ...


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The .pdb contains information for the compiler. It contains debugging symbols. It also contains names of library's that are used in the application and also names of forms and resources. The reason why you are seeing .pdb path in the exe file is because it was released with debugging turned on. If you got hold of .pdb file it could help you reverse engineer ...


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"Re-releases" happen by accident all the time, when an infected, mothballed system gets re-activated, or old, infected media gets pulled out of archive. Case in point, my webserver has a log entry for a Code Red infection attempt in 2013, twelve years after the worm was originally released. Because of this, antivirus software does not normally remove ...


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If you peruse the various vendors catalogs of malware detected, successfully cleaned malware is re-released continuously with tweaks or is polymorphic in a manner that requires updates in detection to take care of software updates their creators apply. Viruses and malware are just like OS systems now. All those security updates that you see released for ...


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Yara is a tool which is used to write a rule for detection of malwares whereas CLAMAV is antivirus that has predefined rulesets that is used to detect the malicious software or malware. Today there are various antivirus engines use yara rules to detect malwares. YARA provides simple and efficient way of writing rules. It is more popular because of it can be ...



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