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Given that the term ransomware applies to an entire class of malicious software and not code from a single entity with a single algorithm anything is possible but it is highly unlikely. The scenario you describe is called a known plaintext attack and it was useful in breaking WWII (1940s) era cryptography but it is something that modern ciphers are ...


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I'm sure there are tools out there to assist in the process, but I can't think of any off of the top of my head. The "attack" you would use to break the encryption would be a known plain text attack since you have an unencrypted (plaintext) and an encrypted (ciphertext) version of the same file. If you could change the plaintext and reencrypt it you could ...


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The two previous posts give great advice. Here are the areas I would focus on: 1. C and Assembly Languages - Critical you know Assembly like a second language 2. Debuggers - WinDBG and gdb - A debugger will be your best friend 3. Windows and Linux Internals - You must know exactly how the target system works so you can identify exactly what the malware ...


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Your book list is a great start. pss' advice to look at the job specs is great as well as his other points. There is nothing like doing, though. To start doing, I suggest starting with crackme (reverse engineering) exercises and some packet analysis exercises. Not only will you learn about malware analysis, you will learn a whole lot about related ...


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A malware analyst is supposed to be able to perform deep analysis of a malware and provide a signature so that the antivirus software can detect that malware. (This is the reason why antivirus software companies would like to hire you) In order to analyse a malware you might need to have knowledge of reverse engineering. Reverse engineering is a huge topic ...



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