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1

Yes Linux AV such as Sophos check for and find EICAR. EICAR is a test file with a known signature used to establish the fact that your signature-based AV is working. Many certifiers require a positive result for that test.


1

EICAR is so simple it doesn't need any Windows COM files or anything ! Have you actually looked at the EICAR code ? Its all self contained in one tiny file. As for why would Linux antivirus need to look for a Windows virus? Lots of people use Linux machines as servers (mail,web,file etc.) ... all of which may serve Windows clients. Seems fairly ...


1

Bitdefender is doing here a Man-in-the-Middle attack, except that it is not really an "attack" since you actually consent to it. Bitdefender impersonates you when it talks to the server, and impersonates the server when it talks to your browser. This requires Bitdefender to create on-the-fly a fake certificate for the target server; your browser is fooled by ...


5

I choose for quarantine because of false positives: the AV software can incorrectly flag a file as maliciuous or unwanted. If it's quarantined, you can retrieve if from the quarantine and usually tell the AV to ignore the file from then on. You could not do that if the file has been deleted.


2

An excellent question, from previous experience a virus rewrote my Windows bootloader and the virus was remove later by my antivirus, consequently leaving the OS unbootable. Quarantining virus/malware is more advisable in my opinion due to if the file needs to be recovered later it can. The idea of quarantine is like ("trapping a zombie in a jail") e.g. ...


1

I agree with the rest of the posts saying that a malware is not dangerous if quarantined and if it stays in the quarantine. But I'd like to add a qualifier - this is only true if the software works as intended. Antivirus software, just like any other software out there, especially software that has loads of code to parse untrusted data is bound to have ...


4

The idea of having the "quarantine" option when an antivirus detects an infected file is to avoid false positives. If by chance the antivirus software wrongly flags a file as "bad" when the file is actually something you need, like a critical program (for example Explorer.exe in Windows) such that deleting it might cause the computer to stop working, ...


4

What are the dangers of sending a file to quarantine? There is a slight possibility that the malware scanner falsely tags a valid system file as infected. Sending that file to quarantine could render your system unusable until the file is restored. This has happened on occasion with some major vendors of antivirus for a specific release of definitions. ...


6

So, users are asked a pretty tough question: Do you want this file or do you want to be safe? It's not even a matter of informed decisions, here... Users don't have a degree in computer science and currently don't have the tools to stay secure. Users don't have time and effort to waste for informed decisions. This point has been debated over and over again. ...


14

I think the authors real point is not the safety of a file once quarantined but rather what happens if the user says "no"? Does the system leave it where it is - a potentially big risk, or does it erase it - a potentially big risk. Without knowing what action will be taken if you don't quarantine, or indeed without explaining what quarantine means, the user ...


47

No Quarantine is nothing but a place to store the infected/suspicious files. When you quarantine a file it is deleted from the actual place and moved to the quarantine location (to the path that your anti-virus program has for them). This is something like keeping a zombie inside a jail. Obviously it is not a threat as long as you don't open the cage. In ...


1

Yes... Sadly. There is a lot of fairly dumb, automated malware floating around (especially for the Windows desktop platform) that is very nasty if allowed to install. Antivirus software can generally detect this stuff before the installer executable, dropper, or whatever runs. Most AV software also comes with transparent filtering proxies to detect exploit ...


-1

If you are using a Personal Computer just for your own purposes and you are not browsing or using unknown sources. Then updating your Operating System on time and keeping your Firewall on is enough. While on the business side it is always a good idea to have an Anti Virus to cut down any remaining potential risks. Operating Systems are sometimes slower in ...


3

Given the number of viruses that are developed and spread monthly, and given the fact anti-viruses are based on virus signatures, I wonder how much it is useful and effective to use an anti-virus? Let's turn that around. Given the number of viruses that are developed and spread monthly, and that there are specialised programs who keep databases of ...


-3

It depends what OS you gots, if Linux then none is needed, if Windows then yes, you need it. Windows- if you won't pay for antivirus (fair enough) go AVG free. Linux- built on UNIX system so no need for any. MAC OS - same as Linux, though Apple suck ;) haha


8

Yes, you should have an antivirus installed for the following reasons: protection against old malwares protection against new, widely spread, malwares You will get some malware eventually (depending on your usage), but significately less than without an AV, and with less impact on your usage.


8

Yes, there are also near infinitely many possible vulnerabilities and exploits on your system, but applying system updates is still advisable. Good security includes a concept called defense in depth. The idea is that you do what you can with multiple tools in order to make it harder for an attacker to penetrate all your lines of defense. The ...


4

YES But you have to adjust your expectations to reality. Anti-virus likely will not protect you from a brand-new virus, but WILL likely protect you from well-known viruses. Think of Anti-virus (Anti-malware) as a "background radiation shield". It's there to protect you from the background radiation of the Internet. It's not going to stop all threats.


6

You will likely see a wide range of answers on this question, and even though this question is quite subject I'll answer it anyways. I believe that anti-viruses do still serve a purpose, however it's peoples mind-sets that need an adjustment. The common misconception among many computer users is that if they install an antivirus that they are untouchable ...


1

Anti Malware systems don't know whether the code you write is in bounds or not, something in your compiled code matches a signature in your anti-virus, hence the alert. You haven't written anything malicious, it's just a coincidence. You could try different compile flags (not sure about how to do that with Borland), or simply restructure your code a bit and ...


2

There isn't anything inherently wrong with using a free antivirus product for PCI, but you really need to consider your centralized logging. You can't keep the logs for your antivirus strictly on the local workstation and meet the retention requirements.


0

PCI-DSS provides guidance, not product recommendations. It is up to you to decide how to protect yourself under the guidance of PCI-DSS. As such, free versions of AV can be adequate. But you have to determine it's best fit for your environment, and the risks and threats you have identified. Please do not use AV as a 'check the box' solution. v3 section ...



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