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1

It's hard to say, because any such official request would come with a non-disclosure agreement. Fortunately, the marketplace has enough global competition that such an outcome is unlikely at best. If AV-USA agreed not to detect Federal.KeyLogger, and AV-RUS discovered it anyway, AV-USA would quickly be discovered as untrustworthy and would lose ...


1

More Dates Data ... svchost.exe when it tried to access DataDefinitions at Norton's install folder. It seems a very clear activity of a trojan, doesn't it? svchost is a process which is used for lots of different things. So it might be an infection or it might be not. And it is not even clear that the infection happened only after Norton got installed. ...


1

Lets poke holes in some answers: Linux has fewer viruses because it lacks market share. False, although linux has less of a market share in desktops, it has a greater share of server installs. servers are much more likely to be sought as specific targets as opposed to targets of opportunity. Modern operating systems are all basically equally secure if ...


3

A collision for a cryptographic hash function h is a pair of data elements (two sequences of bits) m and m', which are distinct from each other, but hash to the same value (m ≠ m' but h(m) = h(m')). Since a hash function accepts as input sequences of bits that can be much longer than the fixed output size, the number of possible inputs to a hash function ...


4

Traditionally a virus is malware which uses the infected host to replicate itself to other systems, i.e. by infecting files which might get shared, copying itself to network drives or USB sticks. It gets usually not knowingly executed by the user but gets executed when the user opens an infected file, runs an infected program etc. A trojan is a malware ...


1

These terms have a great deal of overlap and should not be understood to be mutually exclusive of each other. The vocabulary used to describe different forms of malicious software developed organically as researchers described what they were finding to each other as well as distilling the concepts into recognizable terms for people unfamiliar with ...


2

Is there any type of virus or malicious file that can execute on its own without being manually executed? To build on deviantfan's answer, it's important to think about the stages through which a file will progress as it's uploaded to your server and saved to disk. As the client's browser is transferring this file to you, your server will almost ...


2

Is there any type of virus or malicious file that can execute on its own without being manually executed? As long as something is done with a file the content could trigger a bug (or backdoor) in the processing software. This means "Yes", eg. the upload to the server could be enough without you manually clicking on a file. Is it possible or ...


3

As the article states, this issue was observed between 2009 and 2013, so is not current anymore. It relied mainly on two things: According to the anonymous Kaspersky employees, because other anti-virus software editor were allegedly copying, "stealing" Kaspersky technology, And in all case with more certitude because there was at least during this period a ...


5

A fundamental problem with Windows' excuse for a security model--probably the biggest one--is that the only way a user can allow programs to do certain things that almost any installable program might need to do is to grant the program unlimited authority to do anything and everything it wants. If it were possible for Windows to say e.g. "This program would ...


0

Yes it certainly is common to remove or quarantine all files associated with ransomware (or any other potential security threat). This is not really decreasing your chance to decrypt your files. IMHO you have already lost if they are encrypted and the ransomware uses a randomly generated key. The likelihood that you would actually get any decryption key ...


0

The AV is set to identify and quarantine files associated with malware. It probably can't tell the file is just a ransom note and not something more malicious, so it treats it like it would treat any other part of ransomware. Also, it didn't prevent you from reading the ransom note entirely, it just made you take a few extra steps to access it. Not quite ...


10

On the Windows monoculture Every working Windows malware can cause an epidemic infection. There are hundreds of millions of Win 8.1 boxes in the world and on many of them e.g. Acrobat Reader has been installed. It is a monoculture. Linux on the other hand is less a monoculture. There are many different PDF viewers: Evince, Okular, mupdf, xpdf... There are ...


12

There are some good answers here. I just wanted to add a couple of points. There is an historical component to the argument that Linux is less vulnerable than windows. Some of the basis for this suggestion is not as valid when referring to modern windows implementaitons as it previously was. Perhaps the biggest difference was originally due to differences ...


0

Yes, install anti virus, and do Windows Update and all of that good stuff. Two reasons, your system is an entry into your network for malware, just because the system that gets infected has no information other systems probably do. Also any accounts like steam and the like will also have to be set up there. Second reason, just because right now you say you ...


0

You should install an anti-virus. Some online games automatically download user generated content, and I have seen some that use an in-game browser to display a server's MOTD. Mods are also a danger too, some have included bitcoin miners or keyloggers. Another thing to consider is that USB drives could be infected.


1

Yes you definitely should install anti virus software. However you should always remember that even with the best protection you can still get infected by malware. A few months ago security researcher described how malware spread in Steam gaming platform. Basically gamers were receiving a message on Steam that looks like "WTF?????" linked to a JPEG image ...


0

Risks are always a tricky thing to calculate and you are asking the right questions. While I understand that AV software can pose performance risks, you could consider using a Live CD during the downtime of the box/VM. You get full and comprehensive AV coverage, but 0 performance hit during gaming sessions. It's a little more management to handle, but you ...


0

Don't bother. Not only are you unlikely to need the protection, but A/V software imposes a significant penalty on performance. It will be even worse if you boot into windows just for games, because many packages will detect that no scan has been performed in a while and immediately start a full scan of your system, hurting performance even more. Yes, ...


25

I think the most crucial factor for virus infection of desktop Windows system is, definitely, the culture and discipline of software distribution and installation. While the average Linux user opens the package manager and get the vendor-built software package (and doesn't leave the official repository to find software in 90% cases), the average (non-IT) ...


4

Comparing Windows and Linux is like comparing apples and oranges structurally. Configuration plays a larger role in protection than any specific OS architecture, and it goes from physical security all the way to maintenance and upkeep. All security implementations can be removed in all operating systems, and corners can be cut in terms of maintenance and ...


94

There are several reasons why Windows is so heavily inflated with anti-virus products. (I am pointing to out-of-the-box (OOTB) experiences). Windows users are, by default, local administrators, so any social engineering done on Windows can usually lead to an execution of software. Modern Linux has users set-up as low-privilege local users. It requires your ...


42

The reason for this tends to be historical. There is no reason why a modern desktop Linux should be particularly more resistant to malware when compared to a modern Windows desktop. However there have been many more viruses for Windows than Linux amongst desktop users, which is down to factors such as the number of users of the respective platforms and also ...



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