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If, by installing the anti-virus solution on the host system, you can achieve the same level of protection to the VMs as you would if they had anti-virus installed individually, then the end result is that all systems are protected from malicious software. This would satisfy compliance. There are very few products in the market that can be installed at the ...


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TLDR, blow it away and start from scratch. Verify all hardware connected to the machine. Lock your desktop when you leave and don't put anything valuable on a system that you're going to put warez on. Explanation Without actually looking at your system, or substantial additional detail, it will be very hard to diagnose what is going on. My first guess is ...


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The "Wimad" family of trojan-horse attacks operate by using a normal feature of the "ASF" container format in an unexpected but not invalid way. Consequently, any Windows software capable of operating on these files may be vulnerable, if it uses standard Windows libraries for manipulating them. This may include Handbrake -- I don't know the details of how ...


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I would submit that the only true way to be confident that you have removed the malicious part of the file (assuming there is a legitimate part), would be to forensically examine and disassemble the hex values of the file. It is nearly impossible to know what type of 'virus' (or if it is indeed a virus) without a lot more details from you so the best thing ...


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They are using a local CA inserted into your trust store: • HTTPS scanning Now, we are able to detect and decrypt TLS/SSL protected traffic in our Web-content filtering component. We are using our own generated certificates that are added into the Root Certificate store in Windows and also into major browsers. This feature will protect you against ...


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To scan arbitrary HTTPS traffic, you have to do one of the following: You add a hook in the client SSL library so that you get the outgoing data right before it gets encrypted, and the incoming data just after it has been decrypted. You know the server's private key (and the server does not use a "DHE" cipher suite). You run a MitM, which implies ...


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I think there is no technical solution which reliable works in this environment. The use of an unsecured WLAN indicates a lack of understanding of security in this school. I would not trust them to handle a system with known security problems in a secure way. Instead you risk with your offer, that they will point at you once the system not only got infected ...


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Given the limited scope of use, I would say no, anti-virus is not critical. There are a couple of things I would do here to ensure that it's as secure as it can be, under the circumstances. Make sure you have all the latest Windows Updates for XP. (May they rest in peace.) Ditch Norton entirely, and configure the Windows firewall to reject all inbound ...


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Of course, ideally every Windows computer should have antivirus. However, if the only website this computer will be visiting is Gmail, then I think the chances it will get infected are pretty low as long as whoever is using it knows some basic computer safety tips (like not clicking random ads or opening unfamiliar emails & attachments.) Thus it may be ...


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This situation really depends on how you want to approach this issue, Yes you will always need virus protection, I wouldn't recommended Norton as the best solution for this. It has its pro's but its a complete resource hog and will contribute in taking large amounts of Resources. Better to find something with a smaller footprint like Microsoft security ...



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