Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Using MD5 for consistency checking is a clear violation of CWE-327: Use of a Broken or Risky Cryptographic Algorithm. Any protection that RFC-2387 provided, is voided by the use of an outdated, and insecure algorithm. Rapid7 is making the internet less secure with this recommendation. This BS "vulnerability" is more pointless noise that drowns out real ...


1

openssl s_server -cert -dcert is only useful if the certs (and matching keys -key -dkey) are different algorithms. Then it will use e.g. the RSA key&cert for plain-RSA or DHE-RSA key exchange but the DSS key&cert for DHE-DSS. And similarly for ECDSA and ECDHE-ECDSA now that ECC is supported (since 1.0.0 except for RedHat). Apache appears to be the ...


0

I read the TLS1.2 spec to allow ONLY ONE CHAIN to be sent.: http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc5246#page-48 certificate_list This is a sequence (chain) of certificates. The sender's certificate MUST come first in the list. Each following certificate MUST directly certify the one preceding it.


0

Don't trust a whitelist, it can be bypassed: Content-type: image/jpeg; filename=exploit.php Hashing the files does not protect you if the attacker can access the file direct: <img src='http://yoursite.net/images/526a8f9f3497b5a69bc4523ba0c6aacd.jpg> You could create a PHP script to read the file and send the contents to the user, unchanged. This ...


4

Guess My educated guess from reading the spec: The browser will never see more than one server-certificate. Rather the cipher spec is negotiated in advance. And ONLY THEN does the server send the certificates. So if negotiation winds up with an an RSA-cert authenticated cipher suite, then the RSA cert chain will be sent. And if the negotiation winds up with ...



Top 50 recent answers are included