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3

The clipboard indeed cannot be considered a safe place, this for several reasons: Malware accessing the clipboard content: in your question you focused on malware installed in your machine, however there could be transient malware (like a malicious Adobe Flash banner on a website you visited for instance...) which will not infect your computer when run, ...


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When malware is present on the device, indeed, having the pasteboard store this data would be the least of your worries. However, this is still bad practice. You should not store important user data in the clipboard. You shouldn't even be putting it in the pasteboard/clipboard anyway. Why? Because a malicious application could access your clipboard data. ...


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If only the database server is compromised: yes. If the application server is compromised: no. Store a HMAC of the final password hash along with the hash itself: SIG = HMAC(hash, secret). secret is a single value only known to the application server. It never changes. When verifying a login attempt, recalculate the HMAC and compare. This way the attacker ...


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Using the PUT method, you can upload any file on the server. This can be used to perform Cross Site Scripting (XSS). Today, I have performed this attack, so replying here with my experience. How you do this is explained below. PUT /XSS.html HTTP/1.1 User-Agent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE5.01; Windows NT) Host: www.myblog.com Accept-Language: en-us ...


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Adobe Reader is old code that was not written with security in mind, and opinions differ as to how much improved it is. Both the MS Reader and the Chrome browser built-in PDF reader were written to improve security, and so you'll likely see fewer exploits against either than against Reader. So that move is highly worthwhile. Office 2013 includes a sandbox ...



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