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6

Utilizing Unicode, it's possible to encode \ and / into multi-byte characters. If the string comparison functions are not unicode-aware, there could be a bug which allows these characters through. Wikipedia has a section on this in relation to an old attack on Windows servers: When Microsoft added Unicode support to their Web server, a new way of ...


5

Decrease client-side attacks. For eaxmple : If the page that the XSS resides on doesn't provide a page charset header, or any browser that is set to UTF-7 encoding can be exploited with the following. for example (UTF-7 encoding): +ADw-SCRIPT+AD4-alert('XSS');+ADw-/SCRIPT+AD4- And It Is hard to Prevent XSS Attacks more info : Xss with utf-7


4

On Windows and Unix - no. There may be obscure operating systems that use different path separators. To handle encoding securely there is a simple rule: fully decode before doing sanitisation. If you fail to do this, you sanitisation can be circumvented. Imagine an application that does open(urldecode(normalize(path))). If the path contains ../ then ...


2

I think your question is much broader than you realize, but I'll try to give some sort of answer. If you find an exploit in say, Internet Explorer, what would a program utilizing that exploit be able to do? I don't know, depends on what the exploit is. The most dangerous kind of exploit that an application can have is called arbitrary code execution ...


1

The 2008 paper from Blake Franz of Leviathan Security -- http://www.leviathansecurity.com/white-papers/flirting-with-mime-types -- identifies some of the original problem spaces with character sets. Some tools correctly identify and explain this problem, such as Burp Suite Professional -- ...



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