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Let's look at how such a thing might play out: A classic example is the Dual-EC DRBG which employees a back-doored RNG to create a general attack against TLS. The other half of this attack beyond the vulnerable RNG is a mechanism for revealing to the attacker the state of the RNG at the time of use to allow the attacker to predict the remaining "random" ...


1

There are some classes of PRNG weaknesses which require the attacker to obtain multiple numbers in order to predict the next number in the sequence. Using two PRNGs would compartmentalise the risk, in the event the "public" chain can be predicted, the "secret" numbers may still be unpredictable. Honestly I wouldn't consider it that significant but it could ...


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I think you don't need to keep an entire second copy of the data. That seems difficult. Also, you want to try to avoid bulk public-key encryption. It's slow. Instead of keeping a second copy of the data, you can keep a second copy of the key. Create a random symmetric key F that you use to encrypt the files. Encrypt this key with a key derived from the ...


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You say "This is on laptops that we do not control, so we can't enforce whole-disk encryption." Then your problem of keeping the data you want encrypted will be more difficult. You'll essentially have to create an encrypted container and regulate access to it rather than being able to just encrypt everything stored on disk. Can you prevent users from ...



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