Tag Info

New answers tagged

6

Not only can checksums be recomputed after a packet has been modified. This happens during normal operation of IP. It is not at all unusual for a router to have to update three different checksums on a packet before it will be able to forward an unmodified payload. The three checksums I am referring to are on the Ethernet, IP, and transport layers of the ...


17

Packet checksums are not cryptographic measures, and are not intended to be a security feature. Anyone (even an attacker) can calculate the checksum for a packet containing anything, and there's no secrets/keys involved in the calculation. Checksums are intended to catch errors during the transmission of the packet: flipped bits, miscommunication, etc. ...


0

ARP poisoning is basically when you declare your MAC address is responsible for an IP address, I think usually the router. So you receive all the victims packets in a "man in the middle" type attack. I read that WPA2 encryption happens at a layer below that of packet routing. Google is your friend, there was already a post regarding this on here: Is WPA2 ...


1

Just add "usuario" to "[USER]" and "clave" to "[PASS]" in the etter.fields file. On my system it is located at /usr/share/ettercap/etter.fields. Citation from the file: This file contains the form fields recognized as user or password by the HTTP dissector. You can add your own fields in the right section


1

I'm away from my laptop right now but I remember that the ettercap configuration file is called etter.conf. I frequently use ettercap with arpspoof as a MITM attack and it always outputs any cleartext unencrypted HTTP POSTs. I would make sure that the login page you are trying to sniff isn't HTTPS or if it is unencrypted, that it doesn't post to HTTPS. ...


0

In short, that scan doesn't show you any layer 2 information. You're interested in what MAC address the computer associates with a given IP address. ARP poisoning affects network layer 2, or the ethernet layer. While the computer still sends the message to the same IP (layer 3) address, the packet ends up at a different layer 2 address which is purporting ...



Top 50 recent answers are included