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1

It is generally assumed that your NAS is set for local access and not exposed to the external network via port forwarding or DMZ ... if this is not the case please update your question accordingly. Given this assumption, the NAS can be considered as vulnerable as the rest of your internal network. If you download a virus on a computer with access to the ...


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A NAS is not necessarily connected to the Internet, e.g. my NAS has a local 192.168 address which is not routed. In addition I have blocked that IP address from getting Internet access through the DSL router. The NAS itself is protected via username and password. There are a few attack vectors, of course: the DSL router can be hacked. Getting root access ...


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First, use optical storage like a CD, could stand against EMP attacks. Provided you have a CD-ROM drive that also survives an EMP Attack. Encrypt your data with highest possible key length. Brute force or advanced cracking can eventually decrypt your data but is your data worth the cost to decrypt it? For example, exam questions, if a hacker takes 5 days to ...


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I'd recommend taking the data, place on a hard drive take out from the PC, encrypt the hard drive maybe using something like Bitlocker or whatever your prefer then place the non-connected hard drive in a nice safe, with a magnetic material to try and reroute the magnetic current re-directing it away protecting the hard drives. Pretty much as safe as it's ...


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If you whois the IP you can find that most probably someone is trying to brute force your SSH credentials. Just set a strong password or, for preference, require a keypair for authentication. There are other steps which will give further protection. I am having attacks on my Synology NAS as well. Nothing to worry about if you have your setup correct. You ...



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