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10

This is because SMTP does not offer great spoofing protection, so typically you can connect to a server and claim to be someone else. The best way to fix this would be to set up an SPF record with a hard fail, which is expressed using a- and typically is at the end of the record as -all. You would have to be certain of where your emails are coming from. You ...


1

So there is nothing you can do about his activity, except to ignore it as the comments suggest. What you can do, is to re-evaluate your security practices, and make sure your house is in order in case he decides he wants to try to do some digital damage, to ensure you're as well protected as can be. This means: Choose strong passwords. Don't reuse ...


3

Stored procedures are a form of parameterised query. The fundamental problem that causes SQL injection is data being treated as query language. $query = "SELECT * FROM users WHERE username = '$username' AND password = '$password'"; In this example, if I set $password to foo' OR 'x'='x, we get this: SELECT * FROM users WHERE username = 'blah' AND password ...


2

A SQL database works a statement in several steps. At first the test of the SQL statement is parsed, after that it will be optimized and compiled. When this is finished the database has now a internal piece of software that can run the given SQL statement. Stored procedures are pre compiled. In other words the database creates that internal piece of ...


1

Let's get into the details of what a guest session is on Ubuntu. You've asked 'is it more secure for the system to use a guest session rather a normal account?', and the answer is yes, but only slightly. Guest sessions use a tmpfs instead of a home, so data does not get written to disk but stays in RAM. This means a prolongated session with important ...


-1

Yes, it wipes the whole session (more concretely, the $HOME of the guest user). An attacker would need to enter into another account (either root or eg. a normal user with a weak password). Unless it manages to do so, any change will disappear on logout, which is nice for security, but inconvenient for users. However, that things are wiped doesn't mean ...


1

As per the comment on Uwe's answer, there's only a security advantage if the URL you use reference a library with the security problems fixed. Although, to expand on my comment there, the jQuery team have been working with Google to make the latest production release (i.e. with security fixes) available at a (new) non-varying URI. However Google still need ...


2

The answer to this question has two sides... First: If you host the libraries yourself then you have to check the security notices on the library regularily and update the library accordingly. This can be a very time consuming task if you include several libraries which must be updated independently. On the other side you can audit each library you use. ...


0

Using third party libraries is always the safer and for sure the recommended way to go (if you trust them). To check your third party libraries you can (e.g.) use the owasp dependency checker. That becomes hard for pure content/script-sites, i guess. I think what your expert ment was to avoid using foreign content in your websites not libraries.



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