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0

The of plain text messages is that when the mail client is only reading plain text, none of the potentially dangerous or hidden scripts will be interpreted or run at all. It will just be a string to the mail client.


0

There are programs called binders which will normally attach an executable to an image. Malware found in images tend to be RATs(Remote Administration Tools) which is some skid stuff that some skid will use to gain access to your computer. Normally this is only used though on websites where horny idiots talk to these skids, and the skids pretend they're a ...


0

For pretty much any file format, the programs who read it might have some bugs exploitable by a maliciously crafted file. It can happen (and has happened) also for images; but it'd generally be limited to a single particular program (or library) reading it, not a general "image with malware" that attacks all such programs. Even text files aren't ...


0

Exploits are just that, exploits. Someone finds a vulnerability in some widely used code, and then sets out to set the stage for that vulnerability to do its thing. Let's pretend for example someone out there figured out that some widely-used email client has a bug that leads to a buffer overflow in some specific circumstance. If enough malformed data is fed ...


24

The other answers mostly talk about attaching arbitrary code to images via steganographic techniques, but that's not very interesting since it requires that the user be complicit in extracting and executing that. The user could just execute malicious code directly if that's their goal. Really you're interested in whether there's a possibility of ...


7

Yes, there are ways to 'exploit' buffer overflows. Sometimes the code may need to be executed via a separate script, and in theory you could assemble a virus from multiple images that contained code hidden within the picture using stenography but there are easier ways. Basically many computer systems expected images to comply with the exact specification ...


1

Yes, it is possible to hide malware in an image. It is not very common attack at all but recently it seems that malware authors start hiding malware inside images. Malware analysis is not my thing. if you want more information search for "Steganography Malware". One advice is do not open emails from untrusted/unknown source.


4

You can always hide files/programs/anything in the 'slack space' of any file. Then you could run a script later to extract and/or compile what you have hidden... For instance, you could embed a malicious executable (or smaller script) within multiple images on a website. When a user goes to the website, they download the images. Learn more about Slack ...


3

Due to the use of the Diffie-Hellman key exchange, knowing the server's private key does not help a passive-only attacker. If the attacker wants to learn the data, then he must go active. If the attacker knows the server private key, then he can impersonate the server, i.e. run a fake server and let users connect to it. For a full Man-in-the-Middle attack, ...


0

In addition to Bob's answer, there is another security disadvantage when making use of GET requests with sensitive parameters. The URL, which includes the sensitive information, is sent to third-party web servers hosting resources referenced by the resulting HTML page. Example: First request: GET /someCode/pages/somePage.jsf?pin=MzAwMDY3MDI2OQ HTTP/1.0 ...


1

If the client initially starts a connection with the correct server, then no, the attacker can't do anything against that connection, but if the attacker can get the user to attach to them instead, then they can play the middle man and make a connection with the client and a separate connection with the server as long as client certificates are not being ...


0

My guess would be that the worst an attacker could perform is impersonating the server, leading users to log into his system instead of the legit one. This actually means that attacker can read traffic, acting as proxy. Question is: will key-based authentication have some positive effect for client Answers of that question covering that in some ...


0

The "HOST" header is part of the http protocol, vulnerable applications are vulnerable because they insert the value of this header into the application code without proper validation, this means not only applications hosted on Apache/Nginx can be vulnerable. In short, the answer is yes, your application could be vulnerable no matter what kind of ...


-2

although crude it could be refined but place your qr code over a metalic background (like foil) this way scanners and copiers will create a black image , your hand held device uses natural light and seems to be able to read the code with ease.


0

It's not uncommon for ATM to be in the same ethernet segment as the local PCs. They often use 802.1X/port security to "protect" the network, but it's easily to circumvent by adding a simple hub to the port (at least the most deployed setups). So here is an attack scenario: You could sneak into the bank and install a hub and a tiny/embeedded system + GSM ...


1

"Limited physical interfaces" aren't much of a limitation. For example, this video shows someone completely re-programming a console video game (Super Mario World) using only the game controller.


0

We know that the majority of attacks against ATM's are against the environment of the ATM (ie Card Skimming) and not with the software itself. This threat may never completely be eradicated. That said, can someone point out how the software running the software could serve as an exploit? There are attacks against the ATM software, but those are ...


1

Step back from the details and look at the larger question: Can a computer program that accepts inputs be exploited? The answer to that question is always yes. Always always always. It doesn't mean it will happen and it doesn't mean it would be easy but the potential for exploitation exists. Even an extremely simple program written in a very ...


0

Additionally, the card itself could also be an attack vector. Remember that the data on the card must be read by the ATM and will be parsed by potentially exploitable code. EDIT: Removed erroneous comment about data format on bank cards.


2

The end of support for XP is not that big a concern for ATM security as it is the lack of overall support for the operating system. Right now when an ATM manufacturer runs into an issue with XP they cannot resolve they can call the vendor and get assistance, once XP is end of life Microsoft can simply refuse that help. ATM manufacturers looking to bring in ...


12

Well there's a couple of potential attack vectors which could be relevant. First up ports. Surprsingly some ATMs do indeed have USB ports and have been attacked via them (more info here as an example and also this CCC presentation on infecting ATMs with malware). However you'd hope that ATMs have decent physical security to help mitigate that class of ...


9

Personally I don't think that the support end of Windows XP, is such a great deal for embedded systems like ATMs. I gave a quite detailed answer to this here. It definitely matters for the consumer market, though. In regards to your question on how these things might get exploited, refer to this blog entry for a few examples from the past. I think you are ...


0

Put the SSH behind the a firewall and require a VPN to access the box -- that cuts off one major attack vector and probably makes it trickier to exploit any application level penetration.



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