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3

I would focus less on preventing this one person from analyzing your site and more on doing as much as you can to be sure your site is secure. Even if you do block this one person, someone (or something) else will come along eventually. It sounds like you have taken steps to make the site more secure (which is awesome!), but make sure you are taking the ...


4

If there is no discriminating feature of the traffic that you can analyse for and block, and a WAF is not possible then blocking the IP is your only real option. Your coordinator is correct in that blocking the IP could result in you locking out authentic traffic, so the question is whether the potential for loss from the hacking attempts is greater than the ...


1

The core of the attack is to monitor another application's memory usage, spot a pattern that means "this application just opened a password-request window", and pop up the attacker's clone of that window in front of the real window. For windowed operating systems (Windows, MacOSX, desktop Linux), one solution is focus stealing protection: prevent a ...


2

When you go to http://get.adobe.com/flashplayer/, it will forward you to http://get.adobe.com/**/flashplayer/ where ** is the two-letter code of the preferred language according to your browsers headers. You can then change this from http to https to get the encrypted version, which will have a https link to the latest flash installer. By the way: When you ...


-2

Why does the Adobe download site need to use SSL? Do you need the flash update to be encrypted? SSL doesn't make a site secure. You can download all kinds of malware and exploited content from an SSL connection, it's just that other people won't be able to see it. If there is no sensitive information to be obtained by downloading a flash player update from ...


1

Error pages can have reflected XSS vulnerabilities too, especially when any error trace includes input parameters. If a vulnerable error page is served when the CSRF token is not present, then your CSRF protection does not prevent reflected XSS.


9

The answer is usually yes if the value is only reflected if a valid CSRF token is provided - the user can only "attack" themselves in this instance. However, if there is a form generated that correctly encodes output to a page that contains a CSRF token but then that form submits to a page that does not correctly encode output then your site is still ...


0

The most important Things in this case is security. We want to give some HTML text from user or maybe by ourselves, then store it for exam in DB, then get it and show in webpages without fearing from any type of attack and misused by users with bad intention. I'v been researched about the best way to do that about 4 days and found 2 base ways. Please let me ...


0

It was probably an attempt to exploit the vulnerability outlined here: https://www.online24.nl/blog/security-risks-associated-with-unicode/ The link would appear to be one thing, but actually be linking to a different domain, such as the reverse (eg., elpmaxe.com instead of example.com). One way to avoid such exploits is to type domains yourself instead of ...


6

Not only can checksums be recomputed after a packet has been modified. This happens during normal operation of IP. It is not at all unusual for a router to have to update three different checksums on a packet before it will be able to forward an unmodified payload. The three checksums I am referring to are on the Ethernet, IP, and transport layers of the ...


1

For what it's worth, John Hardin's answer was correct when written, but there has been some good news. In August 2014, AWS announced support for new AES cipher suites, including the nice ECDHE ones used in the question. That configuration should now work perfectly with CloudFront. The cipher suite documentation linked above includes the new list.


17

Packet checksums are not cryptographic measures, and are not intended to be a security feature. Anyone (even an attacker) can calculate the checksum for a packet containing anything, and there's no secrets/keys involved in the calculation. Checksums are intended to catch errors during the transmission of the packet: flipped bits, miscommunication, etc. ...


0

My two cents: The write-up focuses too much on physical security and not enough on hacking. I would worry more about exploits in the browser and email application, mitigating those by using a more secure browser (cough), sandboxes, and virtual machines.


0

if they're going to the trouble of tampering with hardware, they could just as easily install a hardware keylogger under your keyboard. Lock the laptop in a case when it's out of your sight. I always do this in hotels, because it helps prevent theft too. I also suggest investing in a decent Kensington lock, which can be attached around pipes and various ...


0

Remove wp-config.txt, wp-config.php.original, etc. (but not wp-config.php!) If those files don't exist, then it's a bug in the scanner. If the file contains passwords (like a database password), change them immediately. How your Wordpress got hacked and how those files were created is anyone's guess. Each installed Wordpress plugin can be vulnerable, as ...



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