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A zero-day attack is an attack that relies on an undisclosed vulnerability in the design or implementation of a system in order to violate its security. Most commonly, such attacks consist of using zero-day exploits to access information systems or execute code on privileged systems. Such exploits are called 'zero-day' because security administrators have ...


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You need to determine what flash controller your device has. Different devices may have different controllers even if they have the same manufacturer - it seems to only depend on what the factory had at the time. One way is to disassemble the device and read the label on the controller chip Another (non-invasive) way is to use software such as ChipGenius. ...


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Your protocol is not safe by any means! Example for MitM: A sends random nonce G1 to B C intercepts and sends nonce G1c to B B sends back hash_k(G1c) and random nonce G2 C intercepts and sends hash_k(G1) and nonce G2c to A A verifies hash_k(G1) (is OK), then sends back hash_k(G1 | G2c) C intercepts and sends back hash_k(G1c | G2) B verifies and a ...


2

Very odd that the attacks came from secureserver.net Being a previous customer of GoDaddy in the past I have only seen that domain name used for mail services. Reference: https://login.secureserver.net/?app=wbe I would preform a whois on the offending ip and report the issue to tech support/abuse consultant. This information is located in the whois report. ...


2

All this is just a matter of definition and vocabulary. I have the impression that in your question you are confusing "exploit" and "threat". A vulnerability is a weakness in a system. This weakness may or may not be addressed by some security measures, may or may not be known. A threat can be anything endangering the system by exploiting or triggering the ...


1

Salami attack is when small attacks add up to one major attack that can go undetected due to the nature of this type of cyber crime. It also known as salami slicing/penny shaving where the attacker uses an online database to seize the information of customers, that is bank/credit card details, deducting minuscule amounts from every account over a period of ...


1

Tor provides you anonymity, but it will not protect you at all from malwares or any other security threats. All recommendation regarding network security must therefore be scrupulously respected in order to ensure your network safety. You do not mention it in your description, but be aware that your setup matches Whonix project, so if you do not want to ...


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No. Stick to known protocols such as TLS, Kerberos, SSH & IPSec for key exchanges. Try researching Diffie-Hellman key exchanges and ECDH (Elliptical Curve Diffie-Hellman, the new method of key exchanges like your example).


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There are some news articles about existing backdoors on CAs for use by Security Agencies, but the trustworthiness of these news must be checked, New NSA Leak Shows MITM Attacks Against Major Internet Services There is no evidence that shows the trusted CAs use their certificates for MITM attacks, because sooner or later will be identified or disclosed ...


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As others said, putting SSH on a port other than 22 will make more unlikely to be hit with a random scan. You will be targetted if the attacker is trying to get your server, not any server. I have a server with ssh bound to a random high port. And I have a ssh honeypot on port 22, that will reply to any and every login attempt with a 'access denied' ...


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This is something of a philosophical question: "is control X helpful?" And as the best answer pointed out, you should also consider "what are the costs (client support, doc exemptions, system support, monitoring support, and I'd throw in direct costs, licensing costs, etc) of control X?" Anything is helpful in certain contexts. It is a good idea to ask ...



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