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29

The ISP (here, the WiFi hotspot) is what delivers pages to you. It's of course trivial for an ISP to read unsecured traffic: Let's now consider a case where the credential submission is secured with HTTPS (so the ISP cannot sniff them right off the wire), but the HTTPS log-in page loads an unsecured script, helper.js. The ISP can inject any behavior into ...


13

Usually, the password isn't stored in the cookie. You login to example.com with your username and password, these are verified to belong to you (typically by hashing your password and checking the hash of your password matches with the hash for a user with that username), and the server issues you a long random number token as a secret identifier for you. ...


9

Is it correct that targeted attacks from highly trained and well-funded hacking groups are practically impossible to defend against? For the average person, or even corporation, in my opinion the answer to that question is a resounding YES. Have you ever seen the types of technology organizations like the NSA have at their disposal? Check out ...


6

You probably were hacked because you were an easy target. And even if there are no important data at your site it can be valuable to point people to a seemingly innocent and trusted host and get them infected by drive-by-downloads etc. In your case it looks more like your host was used for SEO optimizations, by linking typical phrases to external hosts and ...


5

The issue is that an attacker typically has unlimited time, and thereby has unlimited resources to eventually find a way in. It's an error in logic to then conclude that they cannot be defended against. Of course you can defend, which increases the time it would take them. More importantly then, is your ability to RESPOND to an attack, successful or ...


4

It could be possible in some cases. For example, imagine that the videoconferencing software has a vulnerability into the file format parser (E.g. buffer overflow)... then it could be exploited by a remote attacker. Look at VLC for example http://www.cvedetails.com/vulnerability-list/vendor_id-5842/opec-1/Videolan.html


4

Kaminsky attack is a technique with which you can flood the DNS recursive server (like your gateway) with DNS replies that ultimately match the response that the recursive server is originally looking for. This is also called DNS cache poisoning. An alternate technique would be to ARP-spoof your IP as the gateway and let everyone make the DNS query to a DNS ...


3

In "pure Java", there is no buffer overflow or use-after-free or double-free or anything like that. This is what the "VM" part of "JVM" is about. ROP is something that you use to leverage an initial breakage whereby you succeeded in overwriting the "return address" for some function, and induced the CPU to jump where you want. By definition, these conditions ...


3

The question itself relies on some pretty critical, and invalid, assumptions: We know who the attacker is. We know what the attacker does and does not know. We know that the attacker does not know about zero-day vulnerabilities in our system. The attacker's level of knowledge and skill is static. A system can be absolutely safe. We cannot assume to know ...


3

Making a hash function "iterative" already exists; it is called PBKDF2. Bcrypt is still preferable because PBKDF2 can be thoroughly optimized on GPU. Designing a good password hashing function is a difficult job; but yes, existing hash function are good building elements, so they are likely to be involved at some point. Indeed, look at scrypt: it starts and ...


3

The response by schroeder boils my blood, and I believe it’s this train of thought, that undermine security as a whole. Here goes my response which is likely to get me either banned, or have this post moderated to below -10000 points. Schroeder states: The issue is that an attacker typically has unlimited time, and thereby has unlimited resources to ...


2

I assume the login form on tmail.com will be send with https. Otherwise you can read the plain password with a packet inspector. Your browser loads a webpage from tmail.com. The wifi owner can add a JavaScript into this page. This script will log whatever you type into the login form of the mail provider and store it somewhere. Will URL still remain the ...


2

This really depends on the sites you're logged in to and how alert you are as a person. I can imagine the following scenarios (not specific to any of the sites you mentioned, but just general scenarios): Sensitive information is transmitted in the URL: For each request, a session ID is transmitted in the URL. In this case proxy servers will log the ...


2

You ask: why? What do they have to gain? Were people being hurt by this code? The answer is simple, you are a resource. Attackers go after many sites because they're simply low hanging fruit, a means to an end. Because someone may visit your site, they did it to target your visitors. It is a means to an end. The more people that visit their links via ...


1

This is a pretty scary thing to be doing, as by definition, you are wanting to look at sensitive, user-submitted data on those computers. Sure, you might catch the occasional wrongdoer, but you're going to be capturing quite a lot of normal people's passwords, emails, etc. Which is probably opening a whole slew of liability to whoever owns the computer lab. ...


1

Nothing is "absolutely safe" there will always be a way to crack into any system given enough time and resources. If you have patched all the latest software that's awesome! But that doesn't mean you still don't have to take precautions against weak passwords, spear phishing attacks, or weak code that doesn't prevent vulnerabilities such as SQL injection. ...


1

Your understanding of the reasons why one should use scrypt and bcrypt is correct. Yes, you could, at least in theory, produce a new algorithm that requires time and memory, and it could incorporate an existing cryptographically secure hash function. You can increase time through iteration, and increase memory by requiring large numbers of prior values to ...


1

Lasspass is a browser plugin and is not vulnerable to MITM attacks to its javascript the way that a website is. The plugin resources are not installed the same way that a website requests its javascript files via http requests. Javascript is not inherently more vulnerable to attacks other than the nature by which the code is requested and loaded. (MITM) It ...



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