Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

11

Simple. You read the anti-CSRF token from the newly requested login page and each time the token is attached to the server's response. In this case, before you submit a POST request, you first read the response to your GET request from the server and the new token will be attached to it. Then you use it to generate new brute-force POST request. There may be ...


7

An attacker can conduct a bruteforce attack using Burp Intruder, with an extender extension to handle the CSRF token. Adding a captcha to the login page doesn't solve the problem, it raises the bar by forcing the attacker to break the captcha cracking service at 1,000 solutions for $1. To answer your question, neither a captcha nor a CSRF token is ...


7

Port 80 is the standard port for web servers. It is supposed to be listening for people to connect to it with their web browsers. That is how it works. All web servers are targets for people to hack, so technically yes, you are open to attacks-- But that is the nature of a public web server. You install things like firewalls and intrusion detection ...


4

A brute force attack means probing the complete keyspace on the algorithm. A dictionary attack means that you probe only passwords/keys from a dictionary (which does not contain the complete keyspace). A brute force attack is primarily used against the encryption algorithm itself (you can also use this against passwords but there you use dictionary attacks ...


3

Null byte injection in filenames was fixed in Java 7 update 40 (released around Sept. 2013). So, its FINALLY fixed.


3

I would say a malicious internal actor. Internal actor meaning that he is validly participating in the network, but malicious indicating he's abusing the system.


2

I would do a few more things to clean up the site: Change every password Yes, before you do anything, change all admin passwords, ftp, ssh, MySQL and so. Move all website's files to an inaccessible folder Take the site offline and put a Under Maintenance sign to give you time to fix everything. This will disable any changed file from the attacker. Shells ...


2

BREACH and CRIME don't compromise sites, because they are attacks on clients, not on servers. The server is still involved in that, for instance, TLS compression won't be used unless the server agrees; so that, even if the CRIME attack targets the client, the server can refuse to use compression and this indirectly protects vulnerable clients. Both attacks ...


2

CRSF attacks work by tricking a user (usually already logged in), into performing a request that servers the end of the attacker (either by getting him to click on a hyperlink, through a method such as XSS). An anti-CSRF token protects sensitive requests, by requiring an unpredictable value (provided to the user on an earlier page) to be sent as part of ...


2

Similarities Both a dictionary and brute force attack are guessing attacks; they are not directly looking for a flaw or bypass. Either can be an offline attack or an online attack. An online attack tries automated routines providing input to a legitimate system. They are not looking to create an exploit in functionality, but to abuse expected ...


1

You seem a bit confused about the concept. An open redirect is just a redirect. You browse to http://google.net/redirect?http://stackexchange.com and it tells your browser: please go to http://stackexchange.com. That it is an open redirect means that I can make it send you to anywhere (like an attacker web page), usually by embedding in the link the page ...


1

Dictionary Attack: The attacker tries a list of known or commonly used passwords. Thus, s/he tries a list (dictionary) of passwords. Generally, dictionary attacks succeed because many people have a tendency to choose passwords which are short and easy to remember like superman, harrypotter, etc. Brute Force Attack: Does not use a list of passwords; instead, ...


1

I think this journal paper answers your question -> http://iosrjournals.org/iosr-jce/papers/Vol16-issue2/Version-5/C016251116.pdf However, if an attacker(A) has unrestrained physical access to the PC, he can cause a lot of damage. If A is masquerading as a computer help person, A could easily break into computers, wipe the BIOS password and then boot off ...


1

There is no good software way to do this. Monitoring outgoing traffic on computer with the camera is no good solution as your traffic stats may be faked. If someone gains such a good access to your webcam to disable the light, faking traffic stats is not a huge step away. You could measure the traffic on your router, but then you would need to read the ...


1

From the BREACH Wikipedia page: BREACH exploits the compression in the underlying HTTP protocol. Therefore, turning off TLS compression makes no difference to BREACH, which can still perform a chosen-plaintext attack against the HTTP payload. However CRIME can be mitigated by removing support for TLS compression. In TLS the compression algorithm is ...


1

Dictionary attacks aren't product-specific. People use the same passwords for everything. Just Google "wordlist" for links to hundreds or even thousands. It has to be compatible with the tool you're using, but most tools will accept a word-per-line text file.


1

The simplest answer to your question would be YES, but you need to take into account what software is listening on that port. Since you've installed LAMP stack (Linux,Apache,MySQL,PHP) then most likely it's Apache 2.4 listening on that port with PHP enabled as well. You would need to check your Apache (2.4) and PHP (5.5) versions for known vulnerabilities. I ...


1

In the Information Security world, internal attacks or inside malicious attacks are known as Insiders. Someone who can poke, sniff and even can do anything with a trusted identity is an Insider and can install malwares and anything bad.


1

For me, insider attacks and internal attacks perfectly fit your description. If you want to find a more specific name maybe try to be more specific on what kind of malicious activities the node is carrying out in the network. The paper [1] is from the field of wireless sensor network (WSN) security. A WSN is a distributed system of sensor nodes. There are ...


1

Normally we call that kind of attack "spoofing". It usually implies that there's some kind of active interaction involved, whereas sniffing is passive.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible