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5

The TLS_FALLBACK_SCSV draft RFC protects against any downgrade attack. When a client's first handshake attempt fails and it falls back to a lower TLS version (including but not limited to SSL 3), it will include the SCSV, and the server can know that the client wants to support a higher version but was prevented from doing so. If the server also supports a ...


4

A quick Google search says "no". The original paper from the original presentation (Section 4.2) says that although Buffer Overflow is easiest, it is not necessary. However, a stack overflow isn’t necessary. The payload containing the return-oriented program could be on the heap, and the attacker could trigger its execution by overwriting a function ...


4

According to OWASP: Although it is trivial to spoof the referer header on your own browser, it is impossible to do so in a CSRF attack. Checking the referer is a commonly used method of preventing CSRF on embedded network devices because it does not require a per-user state. This makes a referer a useful method of CSRF prevention when memory is scarce. ...


3

If you want to stop them using your wifi you should increase your security, not hack them. In your router's wifi section there is a built-in mac filtering system that you can enable. You need to add your devices' mac address to the list and pick a mode. There are two main filtering modes there: Allow (whitelist): Allow mac addresses in the list, deny ...


3

Server Side Request Forgery (SSRF) where the server makes a web request to a user controlled URL. Mitre has assigned this as CWE-918.


3

See the FTC page on Tech Support Scams: In a recent twist, scam artists are using the phone to try to break into your computer. They call, claiming to be computer techs associated with well-known companies like Microsoft. They say that they’ve detected viruses or other malware on your computer to trick you into giving them remote access or paying for ...


2

An NIDS would not be able to detect a buffer overflow for a couple of reasons. It's impossible to know what the target platform for the payload is; strictly based off of network traffic. Exploits at the network level most likely target some application or daemon on the other side. The buffer overflow is likely targeting a specific vulnerability, and this ...


2

In a reputation based P2P network, an entity gains more resources or priority by having a higher reputation. Consider for example this site, Stack Exchange: Suppose you could write a simple script that generates hundreds of new accounts in a minute, and generates proper questions for those accounts. You could have your bot accounts vote on each other's ...


2

Given the fact that the hackers had access to the servers and their data, then they had direct access to the HTML files. Protection against such an attack is very broad in scope, because you have to protect yourself against all forms of intrusion into your network.


2

Ping and Traceroute are required to troubleshoot networks. With modern firewalls, and security tools there is very little, and bordering on non-existant chance of either protocol being used successfully in an malicious way. In 1996, sure it was a problem, but it is now 2015 almost 20 years later, and blocking these only leads to dramatically increased ...


2

It is little-known, but DoS attacks can be used to hack a website. A carefully calculated attack against a carefully chosen target can, for a LAMP server example, cause the PHP interpreter to crash while leaving Apache standing, effectively revealing all source code on a badly configured server. Then, if the DB config specifies a user with remote access ...


2

It's an older attack originally intended to be a "sneaky, firewall bypass" that was dependent on a few factors that are now uncommon today: old Unix OSes, lack of stateful firewalls, lack of NIDS/NIPS, etc. It can still be useful when testing (i.e., as a fingerprinting technique not an attack per se) completely new or novel TCP/IP stacks (or just new to you ...


2

The router is like a automated door that would: Let anyone open it from the inside Require a passcode to open from the outside There are multiple ways to bypass the normal behaviour, some are exploiting flaw in the implementation of the router, other flaw in the protocols and some in design. Let's say you invited a friend to stay at your home, then you ...


2

As someone who runs my own honeypots and defends a corporation, I can tell you that any attack leaves fingerprints. Styles of commands or command sequence, coding style of malware, as well as the paths used by attackers can all point in a direction of an attacker. For example, I was able to positively identify someone trapped in my honeypot because they ...


2

ROP is about leveraging an initial execution thread hijack into arbitrary code execution even in situations where the OS tries to prevent just that (with DEP and ASLR). By "execution thread hijack" I mean that the attacker succeeds in making execution jump to an unforeseen place, normally by overwriting a memory slot that the application code will later on ...


1

Depending on the privileges the mysql user (the system-level account used to run MySQL) has and how MySQL is configured, the traces could be anything from a full audit trail in the MySQL log files, to no trace whatsoever. Assuming the mysql user can't do anything but read and write files, your bet bet is to search the drive for files owned by that user. ...


1

Theoretically speaking, public WiFi networks do provide some level of anonymity. You are right in that since tons of people are behind a single public IP address, it is harder to trace malicious activity to an individual. Practically though, a public network alone really doesn't provide enough anonymity to hide someone from law enforcement - mostly because ...


1

You are probably not sending 4Mbps of data with that script, because that script tries a TCP connection on port 80. It will of course fail as you haven't got a web server running, so it will be difficult for your server to reach those sustained 4Mbps of traffic towards your home connection. That script will be sending SYN packets and waiting for a SYN ACK ...


1

Either your web server is internet-accessible somehow or these are bogus-requests; you should check the access logs on your web server, if it doesn't show up there, then it's an issue with GA. BTW, we have some servers in a datacenter in $someplace in western europe that shows up on GeoIP-matches as russian IPs, which gave us a huge "YIKES!!!!!!!! ...


1

My answer is based upon a home network being attacked. Cross-referencing time stamps, analyzing hops, motive, payoff, method (MD5 and SHA1 of malware used). From my work in attribution, I look at the wireshark feed, export as CSV, use an excel macro to isolate variations in IP for IP dissection using IPtables, pull the most common value for the match to ...


1

So, if we put this question in a real world situation, it would be: "How can attackers get in my house if the door is kept locked?" Answer: It's harder for them to get in, but the extra challenge is just getting in. Your router will happily pass traffic to and from your computer, because that's all it does. That's its purpose. This means that if you ...


1

There is no good way to determine clearly who made an attack, or even if an attack was performed by a nation-state, or as Bruce Schneier puts it "A couple of guys". That we live in the world where we aren't sure if any given cyberattack is the work of a foreign government or a couple of guys should be scary to us all. For physical attacks, if a tank ...


1

Disabling SSL3.0 is one of the ways of mitigating POODLE attack. The other way is to apply the TLS_FALLBACK_SCSV patch. There are downsides for TLS_FALLBACK_SCSV as well: Microsoft doesn't support it yet. A bug has been raised in this regard: https://connect.microsoft.com/IE/feedback/details/1002874/internet-explorer-should-send-tls-fallback-scsv Both the ...


1

If these were propositions made in the context of information security, then they all would be examples of security through obscurity. From the Wikipedia article linked: In security engineering, security through obscurity is the use of secrecy of design or implementation to provide security. Security through obscurity is discouraged and not recommended ...


1

I think that the way to solve it is to use Anti-CSRF Tokens and not to relay on referrer header. There are different implementations that can give Anti-CSRF Tokens out of the box, so you don't have to write it yourself. http://www.asp.net/web-api/overview/security/preventing-cross-site-request-forgery-(csrf)-attacks ...



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