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1

I suppose this fall backs to active RFID type of communication issues and, maybe 1-2 years ago, I read an article on the subject (sadly I do not remember the reference now). Researchers tried to authenticate under the following condition: The victim bearing the genuine RFID token was in some crowded public place (subway, ...), Attacker A goes near the ...


0

Indeed, Microsoft Technet lists MITM prevention as the sole use of this setting. And a digital signature does just that: to prove the authenticity of a digital message. If your network is trusted and MITM scenarios are really (!) not possible, it can be disabled. Apparently there's also a performance decrease involved when it's enabled. So, if you're ...


2

This attack is a variant of Shellshock, denoted by the bash code found at the beginning of the payload: () { :;} ;. The way you prevent your application from being scanning by bots is by disconnecting your server from the internet. Scans for remote code execution vulnerabilities like Shellshock are extremely common and are not going away any time soon. A ...


1

Yes, essentially it is. It is not what it is, but how it was achieved, which is what the hype is about. It is a JavaScript injection attack on a global scale - both in terms of impact and in terms of the technological challenge to make it happen.


1

What the report shows is not the uniqueness of the attack vector, but the systemization of the attack vector as a part of a national defence strategy. GC is an in-path system, capable of not only injecting traffic but also directly suppressing traffic, acting as a full “man-in-the-middle” for targeted flows. ... In addition, in contrast to ...


1

This sounds like a component of a broader targeted attack involving spear phishing. You might send a link to the victim for Banking.Example.com and begin your DNS reply spam for that domain. That way, you know which domain they are trying to resolve with DNS.


3

It may be that you need to narrow the scope a little in order to get started. Which aspect of security are you interested in. From the list of standards, you seem more interested in application security & especially in authentication and authorisation? That would be a much easier set of targets to learn at least to begin with. Also, you may need to be ...


3

I don't believe there is an official term. I might coin the phrase: "Constructive Shoulder Surfing" or "Iterative Shoulder Surfing"


1

You could (should ?) also : disable ssh root login (You can still use sudo to do system administration) Disable password authentication and enable key authentication


1

They are not necessarily exclusive. They take advantage of different weaknesses. If you have the ability to do a "traditional" XSS through a reflected attack, then you likely wouldn't need to attempt a dom-based attack because you can inject any code you want before the page loads. In your examples, its not quite clear if you are differentiating the root ...


1

I observed that certain attacks could be both DOM-based and Reflected XSS No. What you list are the same payloads for both DOM based and reflected XSS (both attacks are often exploited in similar ways). But what happens underneath that is still either DOM based XSS or reflected XSS (well, or stored XSS). It's never both. The names for the different ...


0

Your question is somewhat unclear. Does the site already have Open Redirect vulnerability (https://www.owasp.org/index.php/Open_redirect)? If it does you proceed as tim already have said. If it doesn't and you are interested in general methods of getting your malicious code into its pages, then either you hack into the site ("getting shell"), or find some ...


1

Exactly as you are doing. The idea of open redirect vulnerabilities is to use the trust a user has in a specific website (the vulnerable site), and exploit it to get them to visit your website. So you would send this link to a user: example.com/?url=evil.com/sploitCode.php. Because the website they see is example.com, and they trust them, they will click on ...


6

It is highly unlikely that your ISP would hack you, since they can easily (and without a trace) watch all your data go by on the wire. However, since you said there is a strange computer connected to your network, that sounds like an intruder on your network, perhaps trying to perform a MiTM attack. You should reset your router to factory settings, use a ...


1

You will not see the payload in the logs If the attacks were sent via a POST, as opposed to a GET.


0

As far as I know there is no way to avoid being logged by the web server exploiting a SQLi vulnerability since you have to reach the DB and check webserver output in order to validate SQLi result, specially in a blind SQL injection. Also if you registered 18000 requests from the attacker he should be using an automated tool which use to check web page ...



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