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0

There are several ways of doing this. All of them are illegal (in the US at least). You can repeat traffic with a tiny bit of delay. You can make a nice device to do this out of a router and a Raspberry pi, in theory, but you should not. You can also just broadcast random noise, but echoes are worse. This is because random noise acts Gaussian, which ...


1

The ChaCha20 algorithm is simple enough that if you're curious about how it works you could just write your own implementation (but don't use it in production!). RFC 7539 is a simple reference that also comes with examples so you can easily check for correctness as you go along. But the way it works is that you XOR the message with a keystream that is ...


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The first thing that comes to mind would be some sort of custom bootable USB stick that you keep with you. When you come back to your computer you first insert and boot from it, and it could scan your disk's MBR for changes. The USB device could then report a change and rewrite the MBR if needed. You could consider using a software solution that once booted,...


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Whether you use one, two or a dozen servers to handle the task, the bandwidth between the client(s) and the server(s) will remain the same. The only part you can control is the way your server responds to invalid requests or to massive amounts of requests. One way it could be implemented is by using fail2ban and a firewall on the server. This way your UDP ...


143

This sounds like the behaviour of an uptime service. These connect from multiple locations at a regular interval, and are designed to alert the server owner in the event of problems. In this case, it looks like the server owner had set up such a service, and then forgotten about it, since the server didn't have any problems - the alerting service wouldn't ...


2

It is the job of an Initialization Vector to cause the same message to have a different encrypted value when encrypted with the same key. An IV is essentially a nonce used to salt a message. As for why 1/256, that is the maximum possible values in a byte. A byte is a number that can range from 0 to 255. Including 0, that is 256 values. So a 1 in 256 chance ...


0

DDoS attacks' goal is to exhaust some of your resources (bandwidth, CPU, RAM, disk, ...). They are usually of two kind: exploit a vulnerability on your server (or backend) which impact a resource with a small effort (ressource wise) on the attacker side. Sloworis is such an example. The solution is usually a fix from the vendor. exploit the fact that you ...


-1

That is exactly why having a public UDP service is extremely touchy and risky. If it represents any cause of worry before implementation, you can be 100% sure that it will be a thousand times worse when it gets live. The only ways you could deal with such a service are: with a subscription white list; the end user that needs the service signs-up and ...


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Yes, the principle and impact is the same. One of the specific properties of Rowhammer is that it is affecting nearby memory rows only (hence the name rowhammer). This makes establishing non-destructive attacks a challenge.


1

Yes, it is a problem, maybe even a big problem, but "XSS" probably isn't the right term. What could possibly go wrong? remote code execution using svg, especially older browsers off-site images leak your user's IP address (aka lat/lon), userAgent, and net performance malicious images themselves been vectors, lots of 0days in the past A special or even ...


1

No, in modern browsers no XSS is possible via the style or src attribute of an <img> tag. So neither of these would execute the JS code in any up-to-date browser: <img src="javascript:alert(1)"> <img src="x.jpg" style=background-image:url('javascript:alert(2)')"> Support for Javascript in CSS attributes has long been abandoned. You can ...


34

These kinds of requests are commonly used for server fingerprinting. By sending a request that is likely to trigger an error other than a common 403, 404, 500, etc. they hope that the site operator did not set a custom error page, and that it will return a default error page with server type and version information. You'll often see really long URLs used to ...



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