New answers tagged

3

If you used a LiveCD and never/rarely went out of your way to get a new one, yes it would eventually contain old and buggy software. However, the point of the LiveCD is that there is nothing saved in a nonvolatile way, so even if you do manage to luck out on your "risky click of the day" and the browser downloads some malware, all you have to do is hit the ...


6

There is a potential risk in using old versions, but in many cases this risk is less significant than the risk of using reasonably patched system which has all sorts of dubious software installed, and may possibly contain malware. There are of course distributions dedicated for use as a live OS dedicated for doing such things as banking. They are hardened by ...


16

Potentially, yes. That said, many distributions (e.g. Debian, Ubuntu) run package versions which are extremely out of date (years) with few backported security patches, and most people do just fine. You're also usually only exposed on the network you're immediately connected to, so if you're only using a trusted LAN then it's not so much of a concern. ...


1

They probably have a DBA who has been told that you shouldn't let people know the structure of the database due to SQL injection risks. As you mention though that doesn't make a ton of sense for an internal database. There's no obvious risks to releasing a query from a security standpoint. What was their exact wording of the reason they refused it?


0

I would like to know what else can I do to improve my security? First of all, you should make sure you use the newest firmware for your linksys device (if you use it). I wouldn't recommend to connect your Windows PC directly to the internet. Doing so allsows a potential attacker to directly "access" and gather information about the target machine ...


0

My recipe was and is : Portsentry Proper firewall Retailating NMAP Auto-mailing via Perl scripts to abuse@xxx from whois from reverse DNS Auto-reporting to blacklists for malicious IP's Enforcing a list of bad IPs to HTTPS/SMTPS/IMAPS/POP3S It worked and it works, but it took some time for assistance


1

Abusix provides free service/database to retrieve abuse reporting email address of IP addresses and a python library to query the service. You can write a python script to parse your server logs to collect the IP addresses, query their abuse addresses against Abusix, and then send your email to those addresses. Just be careful not to get blocklisted for ...


0

"What can go wrong": If you do that with an API, then all iOS applications designed for iOS 9 and running on iOS 9 using that API will stop working. It's called "App Transport Security", and unless the developer creates an exception for your domain, http is not accepted, and https with not sufficiently secure connections is not accepted. Since your API ...


2

The two concerns you've raised are: The server's copy of the server nonce can be altered by an attacker who doesn't know the password. As the server's list of client nonces grows without bounds, it can be used in a DoS. A common technique is to time-limit the nonces. Say, for M minutes for an appropriate M. For the first problem, by time-limiting the ...


0

There is a strong chance that her device is infected with malicious software, this may be the result of visiting just a link that has been send to you. Try Lookout, A predictive security app which I use often and recommend to friends and clients. You can install the Android or iOS app to enable app scanning, it enables continuous, over-the-air protection ...


8

Your credentials are safe, but Session Hijacking might happen One possibility could have been an attacker might have done a SSL Strip attack while acting as the Man In Middle, If that happens the HTTPS website will be served as HTTP to the victim. But as you have confirmed with the website that they have done it intentionally, so this possibility is striked ...


22

I would raise the following question: What's the point in having authentication in the application? If all the page contains is public content and verifiable in an outside way (eg. a debian mirror, where packages are with PGP) and your users don't mind a third party scrutinizing what they visit, the page might not need https. But not a login either. ...


92

You are right, the regression to HTTP is pointless. Note that all your points apply to one particular kind of attack, where the adversary is able to access the data transport between client and server. That could be the owner of a WiFi hotspot or your ISP acting as a man-in-the-middle, who sits in between you and the server. This can be hard to accomplish ...


6

You are totally right. Excluding Google login credentials an attacker can perform a MITM attack and intercept all victim's requests. I suggest to you to communicate them the risks an reimplement the SSL protocol.


1

One method is to use a private browsing window or Chrome Incognito session as these new browser instances do not share cookies with the rest of the browser, so therefore protection against CSRF is offered. Bear in mind that these sessions do share cookies with each other, so it is recommended to close all private/incognito windows and relaunch when you are ...


0

This guy explains it well. An open port is an open door. Once one door is opened, the device in question can be used to target other devices in the same network. The linked document explains how the author got into the Hacking Team's internal network and leaked their data.


0

Have you ever tried to perform network communications with a rock? How about a network router that has no electricity? It's pretty boring, because you get no response. So attackers try to use the most common network protocols, like TCP and UDP, which use numbers that are called "port numbers", or "ports". (SCTP also uses ports.) If a port is closed, ...


1

As Girish points out, a port scan is like casing a house. Its a a very low noise activity when done from the internet, because you'll see dozens of port scans a day. It also gleans a small amount of information about the state of your machine, and that lets them tailor the next layer of the attack even more. It's also dirt cheap! Doing a port scan costs ...


4

Maybe use two browsers, one for those account, and another one for browsing? This is a probably the best idea since it offers the most separation. This way classical session cookies will not be shared between sites, although a sharing of Silverlight and maybe Java or Flash based session ids might still happen. In most cases it will probably already be ...


0

In STRIDE(security threats) : "Spoofing is attempting to gain access to a system by using a false identity. This can be accomplished using stolen user credentials or a false IP address".[1] Is referred to attacks on authentication. So masquerading as someone with privileges would be a type of Spoofing in my opinion while reply attack refers to ...


4

Consider that I wanna rob your home ... Then I would look up for a way to get into. But your home has door locks that allows only your local(family) to access it so I will search for some other like way(ports) windows(other open public ports) to get into.And try to get some data. If ports will be open for ssh/ftp they try to exploit them. Try uploading files ...


38

To run an exploit, an attacker needs a vulnerability. To find a vulnerability, the attacker needs to fingerprint all services which run on the machine (find out which protocol they use, which programs implement them and preferably the versions of those programs). To fingerprint a service, the attacker needs to know that there is one running on a publicly ...


1

SFTP is FTP over SSH. So take the usual SSH security measures, install denyhosts or fail2ban to lock out everyone that tries to bruteforce. Since the data is going through the secure SSH tunnel, well, yes, they can sniff it, but it would be worthless as everything is encrypted using a modern cipher. For SFTP, the attacker would only know the IP addresses of ...


0

As already explained in the other answer, about brute-force, YES, it is vulnerable to brute-force as every public-facing service. To answer also the other part of the question about spoof, sniffing and port stealing: NO, It is not because SFTP is using SSH and it is solving these problems (for more info, discuss specification or RFC's). Unless you don't ...


5

Most services are available to brute forcing, and most have mechanisms to defend against it. You can likely use SSHGuard to prevent brute forcing as it written to detect multiple failed anomalous logins, and blocks (via IPTables) the connection. Or you could write your own script with checks and balances: pseudocode if tail -n 1000 /var/log/messages | grep ...


2

What steps should I take next to protect myself in case? If you're really concerned that someone might be using your google account on a different Chrome (which would result in Chrome syncing their autofills to your Chrome), make sure you have 2-Factor Authentication enabled for your Google account. You can also set a "Sync Pass-phrase" for your Chrome ...


1

We can't give a definitive answer from the info you've given. That said, I wouldn't worry. Most identity theft attacks wouldn't type things into your Chrome browser. Once an attacker can type things into your browser, there are better attacks (eg: stealing financial info) than identity theft that they can perform. Most likely, this is a problem with auto ...


1

"Spoofing" is normally about using a fake source address. You want to connect to the target, without revealing your actual IP address, instead using another IP address. In your case, you (the attacker) perfectly know the device's IP address; what you do not want to reveal is your own IP address. You want to open a connection with the device such that the ...


0

No, an attacker cannot successfully terminate a TCP connection with the injection of a FIN packet, since TCP is a mutually contingent protocol that requires both parties agree (i.e., one side initiates a state change by sending declaration of intent, then it waits to receive acknowledgment of that intent, and then it will transact the state change) to the ...


0

This is entirely doable, with the caveat being that you need to know the correct sequence number required by the target tcp stack. (so to be able to do it for all connections to a server, you have to be either on the server itself or a gateway to that server). Note: the farther you are from the target stack, the more likely it is that you'll have timing ...


0

Yes because the SSL is within the TCP packet. TCP RST would work. Many free IPS's could technically do this for you if placed appropriately and configured to do so. That said being at a location where you could easily do this may or may not be tricky depending on your situation.


5

I doubt that this has anything to do with google. According to your description google maps was only your starting point and from there you've opened the different websites for the various business. Some of these sites might be either infected or they contained ads and through these direct infections or the malvertising you got served some Scareware which ...


2

BGP hijacking is real and there are enough and easy to find reports in the internet, like this one or this one or this one. But of course you need to be at the right place to do it. Simple from your DSL connected system is not possible but you need to be at the level of ISP's which actually participate in BGP routing. Though you can still play with the ...



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