Hot answers tagged

4

The fundamental answer is the market doesn't really want to pay for general purpose computers that are secure against physical attacks. You propose making tradeoffs, and those tradeoffs involve engineering costs and operational costs which only a small number of buyers care about. Some computer systems try to make these tradeoffs (for example, the Xbox) ...


4

Everyone has read access to system32, but only administrators have write access. If you want to write to system32 as a Windows user, you need to conduct what is called a privilege escalation which elevates a normal user to admin. This can usually be prevented by proper user management and configuration since there are many possibilities to elevate ...


3

The answer to your question likely depends on a couple of factors. Can the e-mail address used for registration be used for password reset. It would be a mistake from a security and usuability perspective to do this where the e-mail address was not validated during registration as a typo during registration could effectively lock you out of your account, ...


2

There is slightly more reason to restrict the characters of a username than to restrict the characters of a password. Essentially, the username acts as a record identifier in a login system - you need to make use of the input to find the password hash in your login system. With prepared database statements, this isn't really an issue, but lots of systems ...


2

It depends on what you consider a "secure computer". Security is typically defined by the CIA triad of confidentiality, integrity, and availability. Once you allow physical access to a device, you lose the ability to maintain availability. It's just too hard to make something indestructible against a motivated and funded adversary when they have physical ...


2

I think some of the things you propose are doable but conflict with expected usability, flexibility or freedom of use. Others take ideas from the software world and try to adapt it to the hardware, but fail to address the problems we already have at the software side. But some of the ideas are already used in practice. Just a few examples: Seal the ...


2

I response to the comment that we are allowing the attacker to have physical access to the machine: There's a running joke in security called The 10 Laws of Security. Law #3 is If a bad guy has unrestricted physical access to your computer, it's not your computer anymore. So yes, if the bad guy can walk up to the machine, reboot it off a USB stick ...


1

Yes, Mallory, a Man-In-The-Middle could intercept communications as follows, and pretend to be Bob to Alice, and Alice to Bob: A → M → B: w{nA} B → M → A: w{nA+1} A → M → B: (F, H(F), w{H(F)}) Step three requires a hash collision in order to substitute a file - Mallory could have created an evil file, E, and can calculate H(E). Mallory observes traffic ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible