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Your problem is a problem of authorization. SSL has nothing to do with your problem. While you must use SSL to protect your data from leaking and tampering, it will not help in any way to solve your authorization problems. Encrypting the parameters is insufficient. It will keep the common user from tampering with the parameters, but it will not stop any ...


4

A claim is somewhat more arbitrary than a permission. A claim is 'blue eyes' whereas 'AddPerson' is a permission. It is an assertion from the identity provider that a given characteristic (or more accurately, an attribute) about the identity is true. You can determine permission based on claim or characteristic because 'all blue-eyed individuals can do xyz' ...


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There's no good way to restrict accounts based on network interface in Linux (by the time a packet reaches a layer that understands the concept of "account", it's forgotten which interface it came in on). However, there are two easy ways to restrict access to an application based on which interface is used: At the OS level, the iptables firewall has ...


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See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Security_Assertion_Markup_Language for SAML, which provides claims-based authorization means. As Steve said, claims can map directly to specific permissions if the service provider chooses, or to roles as well. How claims from the identity provider maps to permissions/roles in the service provider is completely up to the ...


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Let's abstract from a .cer or .pfx for a moment. What is a certificate? It is something tying public key to a name (oversimplification, but should be OK for this question). Certificate is signed by a third party (certification authority) which certifies that this public key "belongs" to this name (e.g. www.example.com). Now, when web browser connects to a ...



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