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From a conceptual point of view, can authorization occurs without authentication taking place first? Not really. A web application denying access to a protected page to an unauthenticated user; The web application needs to fail to authenticate the user before it can know to apply the authorization rule for unauthenticated user. So authentication ...


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I found an answer from Jon Schwartz, UAC Architect, which provided the following details: Mapped drives get interesting in combination with the "split-token" account, because of a weird dichotomy in the system (in large part historical) -- the drive letters are per-user, but the underlying drive mappings are per-LUID (i.e., distinct for each individual ...


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it was due to the tape deck and an "averaging" volume leveller that home decks , that pro-mastering machines didn't use. if you google "paul hughes freeload" you'll learn about it. he wrote oceans c64 loaders. certain loaders had self modifying code also. the built in rom routines for tape and 8 bit are really slow. sadly the 8 bit atari was dreadful.. the ...


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Biding your applications to your AD can be done by using a single sign on solution (Web seal) such as (among several others) IBM Tivoli Access Management. This requires you to create the objects accounts (users, systems and computers), set the permissions through groups, implement the web seal login and an authentication interface for every single target ...


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Even after the changes you made to that registry key, UAC is supposed to notify you of any further changes that may occur on your machine. So theoretically, this helps you to prevent malware installation, but there are few scenarii you may think about: Suppose you give access to a person you trust (let's say your brother but who's not that well informed as ...


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Not a full answer, but another thing to think about: with a system like that the easiest way for an attacker to gain access (ie the weakest link) is to steal the private keys to one of those client certs. Things to think about: Are the linux machines physically secure, or do they leave the building (ie laptops)? Do you have good policies for certificate ...


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It may not be best practice because you're using a specific-purpose CA (in which case, authenticating your OpenVPN clients) for something else, but security-wise, as long as that CA is secure, your solution is fine. I would recommend however putting the private key of that CA certificate somewhere safe, like a smartcard, a completely offline computer or an ...


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Bear in mind that when you enable third-party account authentication in your application it is because you're delegating Identification AND Authentication to that third-party, that you choose to trust. For instance, if the user chooses to login to your application using a third party account, your application doesn't have to be aware when the user changes ...


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This feels like an instance of the XY Problem. The short answer is: Your external applications Bind to your Service. This requires permission from the user, set with the permission tag. You use this secured channel to establish authorization (e.g., share a secret key for use in a symmetric key scheme). In general, this is how you provide information ...



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