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If you don't trust Microsoft, don't use Windows. Using Bitlocker doesn't make you more vulnerable to backdoors that Microsoft may have introduced. Cryptographic software is actually not the best place to put a backdoor: it has a fairly narrow job, it would be impossible to reliably hide what it's doing from someone running a debugger, and it would be rather ...


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Any time you install software from a vendor or project you are placing trust in that vendor or project not to have placed malicious code in there and also to have done a reasonable job of securing it. Some people may suggest that open source is the answer to this, but without repeatable builds and a full source code audit done by someone you trust, there's ...


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That highly depends on the complexity of the attack. If it's a simple backdoor, you have a chance of finding/eliminating the backdoor with the following method: 1. netstat -antp search for the sending port/program and remember the pid + ip. 2. lsof -p <the pid> look up the dies which are showing up. (These are the files used by the sending ...


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Is Bitlocker trustworthy? No, because it does not provide a source code, therefore you cannot successfully verify if there are default system/admin ways to access it. Auditing it cannot fully cover all aspects, so therefore the audit is only valid form a functionality point of view. There are alternatives that pre-date it and also offer the source code. ...


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To expand on @tlng05's point, rootkit authors are professionals, often with decades of experience. Unless you have decades of experience fighting rootkits, then they'll know about more hiding places than you do :P If you suspect there's a rootkit, then your only choice is to wipe the system. This is a classic example of Ken Thompson's reflection on ...



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