New answers tagged

2

A point not previously mentioned: Double encryption. I.e, you first encrypt your message with your favorite secure non-backdoor method, then send the message encrypted again using the government-sanctioned escrow system. This will look no different than using the escrow system to encrypt plaintext, so as far as the government is concerned, you are an ...


5

Assuming all of the above is feasible, what problems can arise from this system? No one has yet mentioned one of the biggest problem with key escrow systems and backdoored crypto, so I will. User adoption. No one is actually going to use a system that allows an unauthorized 3rd party to decrypt their traffic. It's been tried. The Clipper chip was a ...


6

Some disclaimer-like thingy. Others have made very good points which were partly repetitions of the ones others made before and I don't want to repeat them. So I'm just going to add a little extra which happens to be too long for a comment. Also, I realize that this answer doesn't included a whole lot of technical details. That's simply because the ...


1

I'm not extremely familiar with this topic, but it seems like the "tamper-proof" database could actually hinder this scheme. Once the key arrives, it is stored in an offline, airgapped database that can only be accessed in a single room with rigourous safety. In addition, the database and the machine it is located have tamper protection, similar to ...


15

I think that a word combo "Safe Backdoor" needs medical attention ;) There's NO "GOOD NGO" and NO UNCORRUPTED GOVERNMENTS - Ed Snowden proved it in depth and in full. The answer to this question is an old Apple's official statement, that said : "it's technically impossible to create a key that will work only in a hands of good guys and in a rightful ...


15

When a legitimate law enforcement organization has need of a key to decrypt, it sends a formal request to the NGO. The NGO first analyzes the request based on the importance of the request. the NGO allows decryption when the suspect is strongly incriminated by other evidence, and only in the case of terrorism, murder or abuse of a minor (which are ...


3

Assuming all of the above is feasible, what problems can arise from this system? The problems that arise from the system that others have described all lead back to a single thing. The definition of "safe backdoor" has never been given. Both in your question and in the current discussions that are on-going in the United States and other nations, the ...


57

In addition to the points mentioned by Lucas Kauffman I would elaborate on point two: 2.This algorithm generates one extra unique decryption key when used. This key is then sent via a secure channel (i.e. HTTPS or equivalent) to an NGO with the sole duty of guarding these keys. As soon as the tool gets confirmation that it is delivered, the tool ...


35

Would an encryption scheme that generates an extra key to be securely stored offsite be a safe backdoor? No. Simply no. A backdoor is never considered safe. What you are describing is commonly known as a key escrow. Note that there have been issues with key escrows: On a national level, this is controversial in many countries due to ...


1

The quickest and easiest way would be to verify whether there are processes keeping a socket open for listening. You need a utility such as netstat (Unix, Mac and Windows). There are also GUI utilities - I seem to remember tcpstat and wintcp for Windows. Also Process Explorer by SysInternals and TCPView. These utilities will provide you with the open ports ...



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