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1

It sounds like you want a tool like duplicity, which uploads pre-encrypted deltas. It works with multiple backends (from ssh and sftp to AWS) so your friend doesn't need to be running Linux. By using an existing tool you won't need to reinvent anything (except for maybe setting up your own cron job which can access a gpg key for duplicity to use) and you can ...


0

Ideally, in order to provide full deniability for your friend, you would encrypt at your end, and send only the encrypted data to the remote system. This in turn could have full disk encryption enabled, but it would be less of a deal breaker. Why? Imagine that you are sending an image to your backup. Your friend has access to the hardware, so could ...


3

Is it unsafe to restore backed up data from Google servers? Not generally. Like Matthew said in his comment, the restore process will not restore the vulnerable versions of previous applications unless the application is still vulnerable. What Google does is simply store a list of applications you used. You will then have to re-download them, and most ...


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The short answer is Yes, it is safe. KeePass does not write any plain text passwords to disk, instead it keeps the database and passwords in memory.


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Is it still secure to keep using the more-than-two-decades-old Blowfish AES (Rijndael) is from 1998 while Blowfish from 1993, i.e. only 5 years older. Which means the age of an algorithm does not say that much about its strength. Looking at the wikipedia article one will see a few interesting points which make the algorithm attractive: public domain ...


2

You could ask this question with hundreds of encryptions. Why is Windows 10 using SHA1, which has been convincingly broken since ages? And despite MD5 has been proven not to be safe as well, many companies still use it for integrity checks. In the whole area of information security, you have a visible gap between what would theoretically be more secure and ...



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