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1

You should back up all files, not just ones you think look important. Don't back up individual files either. Instead, have your syslog daemon send a copy remotely to your backup server in real time. Most syslog daemons support this, and the good ones even support sending it over an encrypted channel. If that is not supported, you can always set up an ...


1

Any cloud storage service with versioning enabled will protect you from ransomware. The versioning option is key here, as you may need to recover a previous version if the malware changed your files in the cloud service. AWS S3 has versioning as an option, but it is not enabled by default. DropBox does have versioning enabled by default. Google Drive for ...


12

It's kind of scary that only one answer here mentions the verification of the backups so I felt the urge to add this answer: Whatever you chose as a backup strategy: Your backups are worth absolutely nothing if you don't have a working and well tested verification mechanism to check the integrity of the files. It's just a matter of time until ransomware ...


4

No solution involving "backup to cloud" code that runs SOLELY* on your "work" PC is safe. *updated thanks to comments Sooner or later the ransom-ware authors will start hijacking cloud-storage logins. My solution is to share the users folders so that a 2nd highly secure Linux box somewhere (local or cloud) can read the users files and back them up to ...


3

Crashplan, a paid cloud storage provider, has a dedicated article on how its online cloud storage solution can help you recover from some ransomware attacks. Their services could be a suited alternative for your use-case where you need to backup a large amount of data for long-term storage (thanks @GuntramBlohm). Excerpt: CryptoLocker and CryptoWall are ...


14

What would you recommend as backup strategy to avoid Ransomware? Read Only Storage The simplest solution covers 90% of the average person's data preservation needs: store your old data in a read-only format. How much of your data is old tax information, resources from past schools/jobs, photos from vacations, or any other type of information that ...


6

I use a stack of external USB-3 hard drives, "A", "B", "C", etc that I rotate in sequence, and run an automatic nightly backup. (my computer runs 24/7 so at night it runs tasks like full backups, deep malware scans, and occasional defrags) In other words, the drive that gets written-to tonight is the oldest one in the sequence. I keep 3 of them offsite in ...


3

Let's summarize how ransomware works: Ransomware will encrypt everything it finds. This includes: All local drives External media connected to your computer at the time of attack Mounted network shares with write access This provides you with the following possible precautions Cloud storage without a locally installed client (not feasible for large ...


14

At the time of writing, Dropbox would be a good way to mitigate ransomware attacks because a 30 day version history of file changes is kept on their servers (even on the free tier). This, depending on the volume of data, requires a fast internet connection for both upload and download for it to be effective. However, (big caveat) it wouldn't take much for ...


2

The other answers address your first concerns very well. As on alternatives to keep files safe from ransomware while still not depending on third party solutions (i.e. cloud hosting): Get another PC (one with a big storage unit) running a safer OS in your local network, and install a version control software (e.g. Subversion) server. Commit your files into ...


4

The NAS Setup is my favorite choice, for second backup you could use an offline harddisk to make a backup once a month. The NAS is nice because you can take the disks offline whenever you want OR you can do what I try to do. Switch the disks around, once a year, clean disks on the NAS (also good for speed etc). Keep the old harddisks in a good place (and ...


7

No. Consumer grade cloud backup is not an effective solution. In fact no single solution will protect your data, you must mix it up a bit. To give you a good answer I would have to know about your habits, usage patterns, and a lot of other details, but here is my best guess based on an average home/small business owner I'm usually working with. So, to ...


5

Keep it simple. While cloud-sync solutions may provide protection against ransomware through file versioning, choosing individual solution requires research(1) (2) and I think it's a task not worth the hassle. Depending on a cloud service their client-functionality is different and these companies create and support their solutions mainly as a ...


17

Simple, cheap and relatively scalable solution (Although I'm aware it has nothing with online storage to do) I have two USB drives that I rotate regularly (you can add a reminder in your calendar if you're afraid to do so). You can use one of the many synchronization tools to choose which folders should be copied, I use Allway Sync. One of the drive is ...


37

I'm not sure about Google Drive, but Dropbox provides a way to recover previous file versions, a feature that wouldn't be impacted by the ransomware, since it relies on a file copies on the Dropbox servers. So it'd certainly be a way of protecting your data. However, recovering everything over your internet connection is a relatively slow process. ...



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