Hot answers tagged

131

Does it make the site any more secure? No, it doesn't alter anything other than your ability to conveniently save items from a page. Using a browser's developer mode, turning off JS, overriding this with a different script that disables that pop-up, or just grabbing data off the wire after stripping the SSL will all work. Is it a good general ...


54

A scenario such banks might want to protect you from could be this: you visit your banking website and do your banking stuff. after you are finished you log out and then navigate to some other website to look at cat pictures or whatever. you leave your computer with the cat picture website open. Because there is nothing incriminating on your screen, you ...


36

Why security indicators fail vs. phishing There is no action that can be taken that is economically viable. Put another way, it's too effortful to defend against phishing attacks. See 'So long and no thanks for the externalities' for an example on the US economy and information workers. You are correct that checking for URL correctness is error-prone, and ...


34

The most likely reason is that the backend only supports case-insensitive passwords. To quote OWASP: Occasionally, we find systems where passwords aren't case sensitive, frequently due to legacy system issues like old mainframes that didn't have case sensitive passwords. The chances of this happening are much higher with stodgy old institutions ...


33

As Phil stated, you can still use the card using its number (as you would do on-line). Also, some ATM machine won't accept the card if not able to read the magnetic strip. The best thing is to use a credit card: in that case you can block the payment and get a refund.


32

There are two standard ways to build such a device: Time-based. The device has a secret key K (known only to the device and to your bank). When you press the button, The device computes F(K, T) (where T is the current time) and outputs it as a 6-digit code. Your bank, which also knows K, can compute the same function. To deal with the fact that the ...


28

I am not a laywer, but a properly constructed password manager stores passwords approximately as securely as any modern banking system. I can't speak to the legality of using a password manager, but I can say that on a philosophical level, anywhere a personally provided password is acceptable as identification, a (properly constructed) password manager ...


28

You're not comparing apples to apples in your comparison of password strength to your bank PIN. Most traditional passwords strength theologies are predicated on the fact that your username and password is all that stands between you and your precious secure data. These are merely two objects that you know and as such it's in your best interest to have a ...


28

I was going to suggest that ensuring that the login screen for the online banking system showed the name of the bank in green, in the address bar might work. But then I started wondering if any of the local banks I know about did that properly. It's less encouraging than I'd hoped. For these nine fairly large banks, 6 provide the name of the bank in the ...


26

There's a couple of things going on here: Bankings sites will use cache-control headers to forbid cacheing of the pages. So when you click back the browser has to reload the page from the server. Some parts of the site may have a strict flow of pages, e.g. you enter transaction details, enter your SMS code, view transaction confirmation. These require ...


25

Yes, you can. On some places you can find a device called demagnetizer. Just run your card over it (or over a very strong magnet), and the magnetic track will be corrupted and you will only be able to use the chip part of the card.


21

Client side security is just a smokescreen. It will prevent inexperienced people from saving the images or messing with the HTML, but one can easily disable this with a single line of injected javascript. You can mess with the HTML even without this line of JS, using Chrome Inspector. When this trick is used to keep images "secure": I've seen a lot of ...


21

You are right in that one of the ways an attacker could intercept the code is to hack your phone. An attacker could also: Clone your phone's sim, and request a banking code to be sent to your phone's number. they could also possibly clone a non-sim phone as well Steal your phone. Once they have your phone they could perform transactions Perform a man in ...


21

Yes it does work as you say. The chip is "tamper resistant" and will erase the "seed" (secret key) if any attempt is made to attack it. This is often accomplished by having a non-user-replaceable battery and a "trap" that breaks Power to the device once the device is opened, or the chip Surface is removed. The key is then stored in a SRAM, requiring Power to ...


18

I actually think it might compromise security by a fraction. The one who are prevented by the disabling of the button would never be able to compromise the security at all. But disabling the right click might annoy someone who can get past it to do exactly that, and by doing that breaking down a small barrier that might lead the person to continue hacking. ...


18

Once you submit that form, the information clearly goes to PayPal. So, yes, your password is definitely sent to PayPal. However, PayPal is saying that that it only uses your bank account credentials to confirm/verify your account. What seems to happen is that PayPal takes your information then sends it to your online banking provider for verification. What ...


16

The graphical entry of passwords is initially an attempt to thwart keyloggers. When such things began to appear, keyloggers naturally evolved (the people who write keyloggers have not stopped developing them; they adapt to new conditions) and modern keyloggers are also mouseloggers which record, for each click, a partial snapshot of the screen (a small area ...


16

I have never heard of this so I can't say for sure, but I would guess that the original premise is flawed: I don't think any bank would have a policy stating they will not insure your account against fraud if you store your password somewhere outside of your own head. Enforcing that rule would require passwords to be easy to remember, and consequently easy ...


16

Embossed letters are still present on CC to allow to quickly carbon-copy (literally) the card on paper. That's in the (very) old days, but still allowed today, and it will count as PRESENTIAL. Magnetic strip is still there because half of the CC readers still work that way. ATM and TPV outside USA and UE are still missing the chip reader, and even inside ...


15

I'm a lawyer in Germany. Here the special conditions between customer and bank are part of the contract. So we are talking about a clause in these special conditions prohibiting the use of a password manager. I went to the site of my bank, drew the conditions and really, it says, the customer is not allowed to store the password on his PC. So this clause ...


15

Is my password sent to Paypal? Yep. Giving your password to PayPal may be a breach of your bank's Terms and Conditions and/or make you personally liable for any fraud that takes place through that system. Also PayPal can see the personal information and transaction history associated with that account. Hope you trust PayPal real good now! Or is ...


15

Typically, it is a choice between usability and security. Users have a surprising amount of trouble with capitals in password so capitalizing password before hashing them makes it easier on the user. Of course, that also decreases the maximum entropy of a password of a given length. To compensate, you should use longer passwords... If you're lot limited to ...


14

WARNING: Do not change your password! This seems exactly what scammers would do to trick you into giving them your password. Do you really think your bank would send a message like this on Friday with a deadline just over the weekend so there is no chance for you to call them for verification?


13

YES, but there is a big chance that an (internally chip-capable) ATM (depending on region) will reject the card! The most common 2 problems for an ATM (including chip-capable) to reject a card are: a dirty or scratched magstripe (as shown in spork's answer) an erased or mangled (=invalid) magstripe by exposure to magnets or EMP (they need to emit ...


13

It's All About the Security Model We see reference to "Checking for jailbroken/rooted device" in nearly all Mobile Application Security Checklists (e.g OWASP). When comparing it to desktops or web browsers we have to keep in mind that they have different threat models. For example on desktop machines when designing an application we already know that there ...


12

There are two different perspectives here. Implications for you (an expert user). If you choose your password appropriately, it is possible for you to choose your password in a way that is strong enough. If you choose a random 10-character password, where each character is randomly and independently chosen from a-zA-Z0-9 (62 possibilities), then your ...


11

The whole idea about a second factor/step for authentication is to provide two independent layers of security. Vulnerabilities in one layer should not affect the security of the other. Second factor authentication was designed and used properly in the past but lately it has been weakened by companies who care more about profit than security. SMS messages ...


11

The problem isn't with pasting, it's with copying confidential data. The copy buffer isn't a protected resource and can be accessed fairly freely. That said, account and routing numbers aren't really confidential as you give them out on every check so this idea sounds hair brained. Perhaps they do this to give the impression of security to less informed ...


10

The chip embedded in the smart card locks itself after a defined number of incorrect PIN entries, typically between 3 and 10 attempts.


10

Don't do this, it will not work in ATM machines in my experience. I've had to get a new debit card mailed in last month because there was a little scratch out of the magnetic strip, although I had not noticed and had used it for daily chip-only and wireless transactions. It wouldn't work in any (Dutch) ATM machine afterwards (I tried my own bank's and ...



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