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15

Yes it does work as you say. The chip is "tamper resistant" and will erase the "seed" (secret key) if any attempt is made to attack it. This is often accomplished by having a non-user-replaceable battery and a "trap" that breaks Power to the device once the device is opened, or the chip Surface is removed. The key is then stored in a SRAM, requiring Power to ...


3

The best practice by far is to chose any of the questions but enter random text as the answers. As others have said in the comments, it is far too easy to discover the answers to most of the well-used questions now. Of course, this requires you to carefully keep track of the answers and be able to get hold of them when required. Generally I use Keepass as ...


3

The SecurID token has a "seed" value assigned to it, and is programmed with a specific algorithm that generates numbers based on the seed and its system clock. The seed value is also stored in a file that is shipped with the token. Upon receiving the token, System Administrators import the seed file to the authentication server. Since the SecurID token ...


2

“Chip and PIN” banking cards have a chip, as the name indicates. The chip performs cryptographic operations and stores secret keys. The chip isn't just storage, it's a processor and the storage is not directly accessible from the outside. The chip is physically protected against duplication — it's embedded in a protective layer and designed to self-destruct ...


1

The Sebastian answer was terrific. I will restate that in layman's terms. The SecureID token is simply a clock with a seed value in it. Instead of displaying time it displays a number. The dot in that we can see in the picture is seconds (I think), the bar is when the number is going to change so you can time it. If it is reaching the bottom it is about to ...


1

Traditional cards are simply a magnetic strip with a very small number of bits on it, and anyone can read (or effectively re-write) those bits. The security of basic bank cards therefore does not depend on any innate secrecy or integrity. Everything you want to know is on Wikipedia: Info is usually ISO/IEC 7813 It's not a smart card, and has no private ...



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