New answers tagged

3

"Username" vs password Biometrics is uniquely tied to you, but possible to copy/fake, likely to be given out inadvertently (when you don't intend to authenticate anything) and nearly impossible to change. This means that biometrics, including voice, is a great replacement for factors such as usernames or customer IDs, but still would require additional ...


19

This keeps popping up every year as the next big thing. 2016:Citi 2015:ING 2013:Barclays This 2014 paper Automatic speech recognition for under-resourced languages: A survey. Speech Communication by Besacier, L., Barnard, E., Karpov, A., & Schultz, T. (not open access) discusses the state-of-the-art of speaker recognition technologies. The survey ...


26

This will be abused and instead of password dumps we will see attackers trading voice sample dumps and building huge databases of identified voice samples from public documents and places like YouTube. There are also other issues here that make this a bad choice. There's no plausible deniability if someone didn't want to be coerced into authenticating an ...


2

While many valid points are already discussed, no one yet came up with thoughts with regard to the Fifth Amendment (in US Law) and self-incrimination. There is similar law in other countries as well. The consensus is, that having a password will put you in advance against law enforcement, because is something that is protected by the amendment, where the ...


3

I'm afraid I do not have a good answer, but I do have some thoughts to consider that might help others to find a good answer. You leave your fingerprint behind everywhere already. However if someone wants to get your fingerprint, they currently have to spend the time and energy to get physically close to you and find a spot where they can lift a good ...


0

Well, if you use your fingerprint alone to unlock some highly secure device, this example should seriously worry you. It is harmless only if: they do not voluntarily store a full image of client fingerprints they have not been targeted by an attacker that steals them what they store cannot be used to build an image back But you should also know that each ...


-1

I cannot believe so many people tell you "no worries mate, there are other ways for someone to target you" The problem here is UNTARGETED ATTACKS. Someone getting your fingerprint digital hash and using it BECAUSE IT WAS IN A LEAKED DATABASE NOT BECAUSE THEY TARGETED YOU. I am sure what the theme park is doing is illegal in my country. I am not sure where ...


0

Biometric systems are more secure than voice systems (I have personally experimented with fooling a voice authentication) but I feel that the bigger problem will be in making it accessible. Currently the hardware to support biometric authentication is not present in many mobile phones. Especially the mid range ones. In countries like India, Bangladesh and ...


4

Well, If you may believe what their policy says, you shouldn't be that worried. In fact, even if they'd store your fingerprints and their database would be leaked doesn't mean that everyone can copy your fingerprint in the wild. Because a biometric device scans a part of your body (e.g finger) but the software used in that device must convert that image to ...



Top 50 recent answers are included