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1

There is no a priori reason to assume that systems based on "biometrics" are going to be weak. We need to know what the security protocol is before we can evalute its resistance to potential attacks. Just knowing that its based on biometrics isn't enough to conduct a sensible assessment. In my view, good uses of biometrics are those that re-measure the ...


10

Based on the linked article, the biometrics to be used in this proposal are similar to what was used in the recent past on Georgia (US) drivers' licenses: a photo and fingerprint data. So this move would not be entirely without precedent. The linked article is a little short on details, so it is hard to assess what the risks to the individual might be ...


33

A few thoughts about that: Biometric data is easy to access and should not be used as a password, only as additional authentication. As Freedom explained quite well your government already tracks you. Biometric data like fingerprints are mostly not stored as raw images but in form of hashes. An algorithm extracts certain characteristics. You cannot restore ...


11

The government already have your photos, your fingerprint, your birth certificate, it knows where you live and what you have by taxes and the bills or otherwise you wouldn't officially exist, they can track you in public places using facial recognition with cameras and snoop in your internet traffic listen to your calls, read yours SMS...after all that do ...


2

In a lock you have a key (in a normal lock it is an actual key) having some features (grooves, indentations, crenellations) that are difficult (ideally impossible) to duplicate are difficult (" ") to tamper with, and do not degrade/change with time are easy to verify generate a very large keyspace (reducing the feasibility of a brute force approach) are ...



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