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I'm not a malware author, but I assume it's because it's almost impossible, and it doesn't deliver a benefit. How can the malware 'validate itself' in any meaningful way? Malware is fully exposed to a researcher, who can know whatever the malware knows. It can't contain a secret code that a researcher can't also learn. Any researcher can spoof whatever the ...


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Maybe malware authors are lazy, or using strong cryptography would use up too much space. When creating a bot "stub" size is important. In order to remain less suspicious malware is as small as possible, so it can be "bound" with other software. A client to server connection already takes up a lot of the malware's room, adding strong encryption would make ...


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ICANN has a good article on this. Read it. But because you seem to only be under attack from a specific ISP, I can tell you some more. Most people have dynamic IP addresses. This means that their IP changes after at most 24 hours. So everything you banned more than 24 hours ago shouldn't be banned any more because for every given IP banned more thin 24 ...


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P2P botnets deal with firewalls the same way as all the other P2P applications (like Bittorrent, Skype and other VoIP, ...) do: Simple NAT firewalls can be passed with UDP hole punching techniques With more complex firewalls, like application layer gateways which only allow HTTP traffic, it either fails or it uses some outside server as a relay for ...



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