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Considering that these are static resources I don't think these are attacks. I have no idea what it could possibly be... this suggestion doesn't even make sense, but maybe a random syntax of parameters that prevent server side caching. Maybe certain crawlers use this. It's weird because it's not even requesting specific files in the directory it looks like. ...


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No, most cryptographic methods that are considered secure are based around assuming every computer in the world is working on the problem non-stop and it still takes to the heat death of the universe. Sure it could be used to break less secure encryption, and in fact, using a super computer to crack such weak keys is effectively the same thing as using a ...


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It's going to vary for every single attack. With DoS attacks, you can looks for attributes that are different than "real" requests, say values that are out of range, or the lack or specific format of a particular piece of data like a user-agent or referer in a HTTP request. Generally speaking for DDoS attacks, if the traffic gets to the server, you've ...


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A bot net is usually associated with malicious behavior (e.g. the people running the botnet may use your computer as part of a distributed denial of service attack against an organization). I see a lot of dangers in doing this, and think it would be a very bad idea unless you have a great reason to do it (e.g. study the bot net to develop countermeasures, ...


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I have done something similar, but took different steps to protect myself. My worry was not the authorities, but the people behind the network. I found it absolutely crucial that they would not learn my identitiy, as they surely would not be happy if they detected I had infiltrated their botnet. To avoid any problems, I installed the linux distribution ...


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been there, did that, faced a massive DDOS against my company afterwards. i'd suggest: take the script, setup an aws-instance and run it there. never ever run that script on a server that could be linked back to any production-system or your company. try to stay anonymous, because you dont know whom you deal with.


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Specific answer: DDoS Perl IrcBot v1.0 / 2012 by DDoS Security Team Disclaimer This was done around this specific version of this malware (called later tool)... This is not an general method! Playing with malwares and viruses could become harmful! Use a dedicated hardware, user, idealy not connected to Internet! You've been warned! Introduction I post ...


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I'll start with saying that you're right, eventually brute force would crack any encryption scheme. The eventually could be millions of years in the future though, depending on the complexity of the encryption key, the strength of the encryption, etc. There are actually a few defenses against offline attempts to crack a password file that are generally ...


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The issue is that there's no reason an attacker has to use YOUR program to perform the decryption. In fact, for increased speed, attackers almost always write custom programs to brute force, not the original program used to encrypt. They can do this because virtually all reputable encryption programs, even proprietary ones, use established and widely known ...


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The only defense you can have on a locally encrypted file is the strength of the password used to encrypt it. Also, using a secure encryption algorithm is important (AES is pretty standard right now). You are absolutely correct that brute-force cracking is 100% successful. The problem lies in the amount of time it takes to crack a password. A secure ...


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If the file is retrieved from the filesystem to the attacker's system, there is no longer any gateway. The brute force can continue without any impediment. More complex keys or passwords do increase the time/cost of brute forcing, but 'eventually' (hopefully before the heat death of the universe), it could be cracked.



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