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Have you tried Wikipedia? In short, the malware (A) needs to connect to (B). This can be done using many different methods. The easiest (in my opinion) to setup is by using the HTTP (Webserver) protocol. You make a simple web server with short PHP scripts that handle the incoming requests. You send/ask for requests by using sockets (for example) the Windows ...


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Large websites deal with this by volume. They have such as large SMS packages, basically "unlimited SMS", so even a thousand of malicious SMS's won't "bite" on them. For smaller sites, it's usually better to have a request-response system instead. There's 2 things you can do: Either, you have a premium SMS number, and charge the equivalent fee that is cost ...


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It's a classic for a reason: Your post advocates a (X) technical ( ) legislative ( ) market-based ( ) vigilante approach to fighting spam. Your idea will not work. Here is why it won't work. (One or more of the following may apply to your particular idea, and it may have other flaws which used to vary from state to state before a bad federal law was ...


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Besides the standard ways (checking headers, broken clients, spam filters, etc) of detecting spammers, and depending on how strict your settings are, you can try to limit your emails only to fully qualified domains and ignore any "Unknown" sources (that is what I do). I personally believe that all emails should be sent from mail servers and not directly ...


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Being a mail system administrator, I suppose you know that email messages do not contain anything that would allow you to identify whether they are sent by a human or a machine. The BOT will certainly not indicates that it's a BOT in the message or even the headers. Common SPAM detection methods apply to any messages whether sent by a BOT or not. I ...



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