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My solution would be: The user innocent compiles THC-Hydra from source, then realises that he / she is missing a necessery lib and installs it (hence the sudo aptitude install libssh-2 on innocent-laptop). He / she then proceeds to use Hydra against naive's ssh roughly at 18:22:30 (as marked by the network configuration). The attack succeds at 18:50:29. ...


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The other posts made the succinct point of saying the processors should shut you out quickly if you spam them with auth attempts, so it's doubtful you would make much headway there. If a hash were supplied as well, this would be stupidly easy to crack If by hash you mean the output of a hashed PAN, then it depends on the algorithm employed. Consider ...


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Use a browser plugin such as Cookies Manager Plus on Firefox, then you can simply copy the value to the clipboard. As you say, simply paste the value into the command line for Hydra. See my answer here for the syntax that worked for me. "/dvwa/vulnerabilities/brute/:username=^USER^&password=^PASS^&Login=Login:F=incorrect:H=Cookie: ...


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Best guess, short version: It's rooted in physical practices and has been retained into digital practice It's not significantly different from brute force guessing without it Reasoning: Historically, truncated numbers are printed on receipts because they provide enough information to allow identification for chargebacks in a return or refund. For ...


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I think it makes more sense in the context of how much extra information is being given away, rather than how easy it'd be to brute force the remaining digits. A PAN is not entirely a random value, it's made up of: a six-digit Issuer Identification Number (IIN) (previously called the "Bank Identification Number" (BIN)) the first digit of which is ...


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The latter - you just need to hash each word in your password guess list with one of the salts and then compare each resulting hash. Note that the salt is not considered private - all that a long list of different salts against the password gives you is a small number possible representations of that password in a DB. It does not make it easier to guess the ...


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First of all, here is how it's handled by default when you visit the login page and try to log in: POST /wp-login.php [invalid credentials] -> 200 POST /wp-login.php [valid credentials] -> 302 So it's the other way around than what you assumed. 302 means valid credentials (redirect to admin area), while invalid credentials result in 200 (stay on ...



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