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No, most cryptographic methods that are considered secure are based around assuming every computer in the world is working on the problem non-stop and it still takes to the heat death of the universe. Sure it could be used to break less secure encryption, and in fact, using a super computer to crack such weak keys is effectively the same thing as using a ...


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If this were a denial of service attack, you'd be seeing those 15k messages covering less than an hour -- probably far less. This is just the botnet-based brute-force attack on SSH passwords that constitutes part of the "background noise" of the Internet. Make sure you're using strong passwords (or better yet, key-based authentication) and that you've ...


2

When a hash function has an output of size n bits, then: The generic algorithm for finding a preimage (or a second preimage) has average cost 2n evaluations of the hash function. The generic algorithm for finding a collision has average cost about 2n/2 evaluations of the hash function. By "generic" we mean "the algorithm that works against every hash ...


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It depends on your dictionary. If you intend to use one that begins at the one-character "1" and ends with "zzzzzzzz", it is going to take a looong time. But if you take some guessing, it could be done in a matter of hours. You could invert the order and go "bottom-up". You could use only dictionary words, or totally exclude them. For example, knowing that ...


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It can vary, but an eight-character password may take 57 days or more (depending on hardware) to crack. But that is in a brute force scenario. It all depends on how high end your graphics proc is as well as other elements.I do Not know much about hashcat. But I do use Kismet I would recommended it in your EH testing. Something to think about: Cracking a ...



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