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Bruteforcing FDE is not easily done, regardless of the type used. As mentioned in a similar thread even BitLocker requires a 48 character recovery key. There aren't many tools available for cracking FDE, but the ones that are will be solution specific. If you update your question with some details, we may be able to provide more info.


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Supposing you had infinite time... Bitlocker by default uses AES-CBC-128, so you could stage a crib attack (aka "known plaintext attack") against some sector containing well known data. NTFS should have several of those. You would need to look for efficiently implemented GPU or ASIC crackers in order to delay as much as possible the heat death of the ...


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Well you have to brute-force the 48 character recovery key (https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/si_team/2006/08/10/bitlocker-recovery-password-details/) As I remember it visually shown when 6 character sub-key is successfully entered so I guess it is possible but if there are tools available I'm unaware of. Good luck


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There is an attack vector called rainbow tables attack. In it the attacker cross references the md5 sum against a database of known md5 hashes. You don't need to run brute force always. I believe that this file was populated using this technique.


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No. John the Ripper is designed to look at a hash and compare it to common password hashes, salted or unsalted. It doesn't directly input values into a box, and it uses GPU acceleration when available to reduce processing time. Unless you can find the hash for the password on the flash drive, this tool is completely worthless for this purpose.


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Any practical brute-force algorithm will take into account the method a password was generated with. If a password was randomly generated. You should assume brute-force algorithm also to be truly random. You don't know what it is, you can't claim one password is faster to find than the other, you can only tell that on average passwords would be discovered ...


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No need to worry, these are just typical attempts to find vulnerable servers. You've Fail2Ban already installed, this way you decrease the brute force attempts.


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Stealing data from the memory is definitely easier than stealing it from an encrypted file. You can take a dump of your memory and then scan it to search the password. On a side note, I believe the bigger risk here is that there is a very simple mapping between the seed and the password. Also, the seeds seem to be predictable. Once that is compromised, do ...


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Making brute-force attack the only possible option is a desired feature of a security system. This "only" would mean there are no weaknesses in the algorithm or implementation and the system could be broken only by trying all combinations of possible passwords. On top of making sure brute-force attack is the only possibly, it should also be made difficult ...


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To clarify and expand what I said in the comment: A GPU-based cracker can go through a LOT of MD5 hash per seconds. According to this, one based on the (old) NVIDIA Geforce 8800 Ultra can compute about 200 million hashes per seconds. Since your keyspace is a bit above 2 millions entry large, it means that you can get through ALL of it in about one second ...



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