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2

Well, this actually may not be the answer but FYI penetration testing software like kali have inbuilt wpscan tool which can enumerate the username, themes and plug-ins used and can list the vulnerabilities in those plug-ins and themes. Remaining brute force attack can be done by using any tools found on Web. Here, I am not saying kali is bad but it can be ...


3

I noticed this as well and wrote a blog post about it a while ago: wordpress username leak. To summarize: The leak is probably here: example.com/author/user_nicename. This page can for example be reached via example.com/?author=1. WordPress has three username related fields in the database: username, nickname, and user_nicename. username is the name with ...


0

A user name is easy, the password is a different issue. There have been data leaks that yield user names, addresses, etc. but the passwords were encrypted and salted and no passwords were compromised. If you know one username at a large company you probably know the domain log in username format for 10's of thousands of users.


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Sorry for the late answer, but I just joined. Graham has some good information, but it requires a bit of expansion and one correction. Entropy is a measure of randomness, not character set. Regardless of passwords or passphrases, length is more important than complexity. Complexity becomes more important if you are limited to a short password (20 or less ...


2

you can run following python code to do this import zipfile,sys,time import itertools def extractFile(zFile, password): try: answer= zFile.extractall(pwd=password) print 'Fount password : ', password return True except: #print password + " was incorrect" return False def main(ifile): zFile = ...


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lowercase + numbers Incremental actually has a predefined mode for lowercase + numbers: [Incremental:LowerNum] File = $JOHN/lowernum.chr MinLen = 1 MaxLen = 13 CharCount = 36 From the documentation: "LowerNum" (lowercase letters plus digits, for 36 total) Just adjust MinLen and MaxLen. Create new incremental mode with certain characters If you ...


2

It depends on the ISP and their level of customer care/repsonsibility. As a business ISP we consider any routers/firewalls/etc we provide as our responsibility; we don't expect every small to medium enterprise to have a technical team or someone competent enough to be able to protect themselves proactively so we will deal with these as and when we are ...


5

Denial of service attacks and brute force attacks on a single client are two very different things and ISPs will have different responses. Also, ISPs are not all created equal, some will be better than others at detecting and dealing with problems. Distributed denial of service attacks attempt to flood a host or hosts with malicious traffic of some kind, ...


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I just created a tool that will do what you are talking about. It basically takes a word and generates different possible passwords by replace the characters with capital/lowercase letters and common substitutions. Feel free to take a look at it here: https://github.com/Broham/PassGen


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I tried Hydra on an HTTP-POST web form and I kept getting false positives. After a lot of research and googling tutorials it turns out I did not identify the "failure response". When the login fails, the server replies with a failure response maybe a redirection or a string of text. I hope this points you in the right direction.


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Under some conditions, your hashes might leak sensitive information. This depends on whether or not an attacker can guess the content of specific files. As a trivialized example, let's say your files are memos from your boss which say which employee they are going to fire. They are always simple ASCII text files in the form of The next employee we fire is ...


1

SHA-1 produces a 160 bit hash. Hashing any file longer than 160 bits (20 octets) will therefore necessarily lose information and makes reconstruction impossible. In theory, that is. On the other hand, hashing files shorter than 20 octets is highly likely (practically guaranteed) to produce a 1:1 mapping. A 1:1 mapping means that without salt, it is trivial ...


0

Question: Do you want to publish the sensitive file names on the internet? Your approach above seems to imply that you will be publishing your file names on the internet. You may not want your file names published on the internet. brain@brain-laptop:~/Secret Files$ sha256sum * c988f4a50da6021fc70f618faeb5e27891b5de7162fb395b1dfd5b42f76a8070 Blueprints ...


2

The security you are thinking of with regards to the hash strength and the security you are talking about with the hashes on the internet are two different things. Hashes like SHA* are designed to work quickly so that files you send and the file you receive can be verified to be the same, however, this makes it easier brute force, due to this speed. What it ...


1

I think now you already know from the answers, why it can be a problem to send password hash to the server. I would just like to comment on this particular point: I would like to do this because it reduces the computational power the server needs. Doing moderately expensive things on the client is never a bad idea. The fact that bcrypt (an adaptive ...


3

This post should answer your question: https security - should password be hashed server-side or client-side? Basically, if you hash on the client side the hashed password becomes the authentication token and it means that you are in essence storing the password in plain text in the database. So to answer your question: It would not compromise your ...


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The issue is that your hash now essentially becomes your password. If your database of hashes gets stolen, they don't need to worry about brute-forcing any of the hashes, because that's all you need to send now to authenticate.


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john --stdout --incremental:all | aircrack-ng -e ESSID -w - /home/user/input_wpa.cap Edit the john conf file to change from 8 to 10


1

Rate limiting is probably the only practical way to mitigate these attacks for most public-facing applications. And you're correct in that it's a security/UX tradeoff. Given the login form example alone, "your username or password is invalid" is a more secure (exposes less information) way to present info, but most public services have other endpoints to ...


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First, I'm not entirely sure what the question is, so I'm going to make some guesses. Is there a trade off between security and UX? Yes. Just like the trade off between security and performance, and the trade off between performance and UX, and the trade off between any set of requirements for a system. That is the nature of requirements. If they were ...


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Most of your assumptions are correct. The general idea (as far as the user interface is concerned) is: give the attacker as little information as possible slow down the attacker If people need to register you cannot avoid the error message 'This user already exists'. If registered users need to login the generally recommended precautions are indeed: ...


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You can easily inject characters as if typed either via USB tools or code. Depending on the latency of trying a code and assuming no lock-outs it may not take too long to iterate through every possibility. A better option may be to attach a debugger, enter any code and step through until you see the check of the input string. Change the logic of the result ...



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