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There is a pretty good explanation at the following link on stackoverflow: reverse engineering c programs Short answer: There is no way to get exactly the same code that you have on a C written program. It passes through many stages until it reaches binary code for a specific machine. It is somehow compared to an ice cube that melted, assuming that you ...


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NOPs are just padding. Your best bet is to perform a file analysis, or behavioral analysis (what does it call, what files does it load, etc) of the binary if you are that concerned. You could search the md5/sha1 checksums on sites like Virustotal, ThreatConnect, ThreatCrowd, etc. Since you mentioned you are compiling into Windows, my guess is, the NOPs are ...


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I'm talking about the type of exploits that you compile and that result in an executable that exploits a daemon (and not by passing specially crafted input through human input fields). They do so by passing specially crafted input through non-human input fields. A program that does something useful needs to interact with some other programs in some ...


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I used this ftp vulnerability (@halfinformed gave it to me in the comments). So here is the steps to install and exploit with a simple reverse shell : Install the vulnerable service from the link given above. Generate a new payload that fits your need (depending on your IP address) with this command msfvenom -a x86 --platform windows -p ...



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