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Yes, this has been implemented before. In this blog post, Erin Ptacek briefly mentions how AVR has different program and data memory and how this makes exploitation more difficult. A Harvard Architecture has two distinct memories; there is program memory (imem, typically flash) and data memory (dmem, typically SRAM). They live in two different address ...


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The problem with most operating systems is that they follow a specific "calling convention." This convention requires putting function parameters on the stack, being some derivative of the C-style calling convention. You must use this convention for ABI (Application Binary Interface) compatibility with that OS. So, without OS support, you could only use this ...


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I'm only speculating, but yes the N's are for the initial buffer overflow. You'll notice that %u9090%u6858%ucbd3%u7801 is repeated over and over. These are 8 bytes of unicode values in hexidecimal. %u9090 is most likely a NOP (no operation) machine instruction. In hexidecimal for Intel x86 then this instruction is one byte, 0x90. So it repeats these 8 ...


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I'm at risk of being redundant by adding yet another answer, but I think the existing answers might not fully address what you're asking. In a traditional buffer overflow vulnerability (specifically of the stack-based variety), one tries to overwrite the frame pointer on the stack in order to cause execution to jump into exploit code when the current ...



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