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We know this because the number of hits on the search server is much larger than the one shown by Google Analytics for the index page. Your premise is flawed (it may be correct, but it's still flawed). GA only shows you who has co-operated with GA. If a user's javascript is disabled (doesn't seem to apply in your case), GA is blocked etc. etc. the ...


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Disabling Allow cross origin access only prevents cross-site HTTP requests made by JavaScript from another website on which an arbitrary user is surfing. 'Real' bots, which are not restricted within a JavaScript environment for example, are not affected by this option. You now have to differentiate between requests initiated by users and those requests ...


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As Paul mentioned, using a key will prevent basic bots to crawl your website, but more advanced scripts will bypass that easily. Also note that modern bots are capable of running Javascript as a real user would do, and that includes Google Analytics JS code. A reasonable balance in terms of security versus user-experience, would be to configure quotas and ...


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If the user invokes over x amount of queries per x amount of time which seems impossible via a human then you'll want to generate a captcha to prevent bots. If the user invokes a silly amount of requests just ban his/her IP for x amount of time as it's clear they are using some form of botting. You could generate a key everytime the user searches (This ...



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