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Not only will they not issue new certificates for unvalidatable IPs, but also revoke them in 2016. https://www.digicert.com/internal-names.htm As from 1 October 2016, CAs shall revoke all unexpired Certificates. More info in Mozilla's Wiki: CA:Problematic_Practices#Certificates_referencing_hostnames_or_private_IP_addresses


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For public IP it must be checked that the IP is actually owned by the one who requests the certificate. Issuing certificates for private (reserved) IP is deprecated because obviously the ownership cannot be checked. For more information see CA baseline requirements Sect 9.2.1.


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(Edit 2014-11-25: Reworded flushed out to phased out.) Short answer: From what I can tell, they will be gracefully phased out, not flushed out. (At least by Microsoft.) The old SHA1 root certs will expire regularly and Microsoft will no longer accept NEW SHA1-roots starting 2016. The old ones will stay in I guess, since they were compliant to the guidelines ...


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If you want to do that install Firefox. Firefox comes with its own trusted CA store and what you add there will only be available to Firefox.


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While there doesn't appear to be any existing privacy-friendly CAs at this moment, all evidence suggests that the recently-announced Let's Encrypt CA (launching summer 2015) will not require users to provide personal information. This could change, but I doubt it will given EFF's involvement. If Let's Encrypt will not collect any personal information when ...


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As far as other Certificate Authority (CA) root certificates security is concern, then there are no issues expect if you are going to implement an authorized Certificate Authority SSL certificate. If the security certificate is from Trusted Certificate authority then it never cause any security trouble.



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