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42

The entire point of SSL is its resistance to eavesdropping by man-in-the-middle attacks like the one you're proposing. If you cannot make the client device trust your self-signed certificate, then your only options are: Intercept an initial HTTP request and never let the communication be upgraded to HTTPS (this will not work if the site has an HSTS record ...


18

This client behavior is prohibited by section 8.1 of the RFC: If an HTTP response is received over insecure transport, the UA MUST ignore any present STS header field(s). The spec prohibits severs from sending insecure HSTS directives and clients from processing insecure HSTS directives. This ensures that a faulty implementation in either a server or ...


12

Looks like the certificate is only valid for opensource.apple.com, not www.opensource.apple.com: www.opensource.apple.com uses an invalid security certificate. The certificate is only valid for opensource.apple.com (Error code: ssl_error_bad_cert_domain) You can simply use the former.


11

Any suggestions? Is is doable? You need to own a certificate trusted by the device to intercept the traffic. How this can be achieved depends on how proper and open the certificate validation on the device is. The device might have a buggy or non-existing validation of certificates. This is typically No validation at all, in which case you could use ...


5

The server sends the entire certificate chain, up to and possibly including the root certificate, all at once as part of the Server Certificate TLS handshake message: certificate_list This is a sequence (chain) of certificates. The sender's certificate MUST come first in the list. Each following certificate MUST directly certify the one ...


5

What would be the point ? A public certificate is public: if you need to password-protect it, it would mean your security model is flawed. Therefore, there is no standard way to store an X509 certificate in a password-protected form. That being said, in practice, you can place a cert into any kind of container: a PGP protected file, a ZIP file, a ...


5

is it trust-worthy because the CA authority did a background check on them? No. A SSL certificate is comparable to a passport: it says who the person is and which country the passport issued. But it does not say how trustworthy the person is. The main use of the certificate is to make end-to-end encryption possible, that is protecting against ...


3

Use of SHA-1 is irrelevant here. The problem with a self-signed certificate is that there is no way for anybody to verify that the certificate is the correct one or not; this is exactly what the client warnings mean. When one of your staff sees the warning, and he clicks through to connect nonetheless, then that user could be connecting to a fake VPN ...


3

Take a Look at the FREAK tls vulnerability. you should be able to inject data into the SSL negotiation to trick the device into a RSA Export cipher, and from there the decryption of traffic by a man in the middle is significantly easier ( aka possible. ) Charles is written in java, shouldn't be too hard to modify to exploit this automatically.


3

No. This is the point of SSL, to prevent this kind of unauthorized snooping. To authorize your proxy you need to tell the device to trust the proxy certificate, and tell the device clients to trust your certificate or use the devices private key, which it sounds like you don't have access to. For more information: ...


3

No, the very nature of HTTPS is that the certificate is required to decrypt it. You could sniff the traffic, but it would be encrypted and useless to you.


3

You should see the certificate infrastructure (that is to say the PKI, Public Key Infrastructur) as a web of trust. When you are communicating with multiple persons, which wants to mutually authenticated themselves (and their websites), you first choose a common trusted person. This third person becomes a "Trusted Third Party" and will be called the ...


3

Edit: I realise that this may not be clear from the answer below... but from the point of view of your application, it doesn't really make any difference whether you run the PKI/CA yourself or whether you use one or more third-party CAs. Even if you choose to run your own PKI, you really don't want to code it yourself - so you'd use one of the existing ones, ...


3

This may be to avoid the use of this header to cause a denial of service attack. Imagine an insecure HTTP-only website. Now imagine someone able to tamper with the HTTP headers sent by this site to add an HSTS header. According to the RFC: The UA should stop trying to access the site through HTTP, and try to use HTTPS only instead. If the UA is unable to ...


2

As of January 1, 2015 all EV certificates are required to have public audit records (Signed Certificate Timestamps). The most common way of including these records is through Embedded SCTs. This method includes a new certificate extension/OID (1.3.6.1.4.1.11129.2.4.2) in the certificate file itself. For OV and DV certificates, you can request that your CA ...


2

"End Entity" is defined in X.509 (well,RFC 5280) as: end entity: user of PKI certificates and/or end user system that is the subject of a certificate; but the expression really makes sense in the context of path validation: an "EE" certificate is called that way because when it appears in a certificate path, it is necessarily at the end of ...


2

It is perfectly possible to have the same public key in several distinct certificates. Mathematically, the public and private key are linked (in RSA parlance, they use the same modulus) and there is nothing that you can do for or against it. It just is. Technically, a given machine may store certificates and private keys in some dedicated structures, and a ...


2

Trial certs There are several CAs that will generate short-lived trial certificates for you. Here's one: https://www.instantssl.com/free-ssl-certificate.html Short certs And there are some CAs that will generate longer lived free certificates for you. StartCOM/StartSSL has been doing this for several years. https://www.startssl.com/ StartCom on Wikipedia ...


2

You only need to trust the root CA, the intermediate (and other) certificates will be checked if they are signed by a trusted root CA, or a intermediate that is trusted by a root CA. If that root CA is trusted by you, all certificates signed with that will be trusted by you. For example, when you have a chain [user] → [intermed-1] → [intermed-2] → ...


2

(I can't find any documentation that goes into which order I specifically need it in, and which certificates I actually need to include). RFC5246 is pretty clear on this: certificate_list This is a sequence (chain) of certificates. The sender's certificate MUST come first in the list. Each following certificate MUST directly certify the one ...


2

I work for a penetration testing company that requires a client certificate to log into any of our testing hosts. The certificates do require you enter a pass phrase when authenticating. This is done as an added layer of security, not to replace the need for passwords. If the certificate does not require a pass phrase, then yes - letting someone get a ...


2

This is defined in IETF RFC4945, section 6.1 (page 36). It is basically a standardised format for protecting important identifying start and ending sequences of encoded data in plain-text files, known as an encapsulation boundary, that has been around for a long time (since at least RFC934, published in 1984).


2

You can not generate your own EV certificates and especially you can not generate self-signed EV certificates. Only some CA's are able to generate these and these CA's are specifically marked in the SSL stacks of the browser or operating systems. If you want to create EV by yourself you would have to change the SSL stack used by the browser to accept the ...


2

It is hard to tell you exactly what is going on because we don't know what request actually triggered the message and you do. What it looks like, however, is that for some reason, a secure request intended for Toshiba's update server went to www.bcrea.bc.ca. There can be many reason for this but few are really encouraging: Something in your DNS resolution ...


2

Actually, there is an often unused (at least on the web) optional part of SSL/TLS that allows for client authentication. It is generally not used on the web because the server doesn't really care if the client is who they say they are - they just need to have the proper credentials. Additionally, imagine the nightmare of having to verify every client in the ...


2

Short answer: you can't, because they are two different and incompatible key+certificate systems. Longer answer: Windows Certificate Manager uses X.509 certificates, each of which must be signed by a Certification Authority whose root certificate is considered valid by Windows. Thunderbird will use the public key stored in your recipient's certificate to ...


1

No, the web server cannot check to see all the CA's the client has installed. If you have access to the client machine, you can check by viewing the Trusted Root Certification Authorities store.


1

Quick & Dirty: $ openssl pkcs12 -in <CERTFILE> -nokeys -password pass: 2> /dev/null | grep -c "BEGIN CERTIFICATE" Please be aware, that this assumes that there are no password(s) set. Otherwise you'll have to fiddle around with the password argument.


1

The root certificate should be enough. It is the server's responsibility to provide any necessary intermediate certificates. To quote RFC 5246: This is a sequence (chain) of certificates. The sender's certificate MUST come first in the list. Each following certificate MUST directly certify the one preceding it. Because ...


1

If the thieves man-in-the-middle connections to saas.example.com and present the wildcard cert, would the customer getting man-in-the-middled get any sort of SSL-related warning from their browser? Usually not because the attacker presents a non-revoked certificate which is valid for the accessed host. The client would only reject the valid certificate ...



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