Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

Https is http via TLS/SSL. TLS provides three things: Data encryption Server authentication (the server is who they say they are) Client authentication (the client is who they say they are) To achieve 1) a self-signed certificate is enough, but for 2) you need a certificate that is signed by a certificate authority known to the client (your browser). ...


17

Even if you see a message saying the connection is not trusted does not mean it is not an HTTPS connection. In order to display or not such error messages, browsers try to validate certificates using following criteria: Does the certificate common name match the domain name entered in the URL bar? Is the current date between validity start date and ...


12

The error message you got is the normal behavior of browsers when dealing with self-signed certificates because your self signed certificate can not say who the recipient of the data (your server) really is (trust), so you got that message asking you if you are sure you trust your website (serever). Anyway since your browser can't verify that you are ...


3

One possible solution for you is to install your self signed certificate as a Trusted Root CA on your notebook. See, https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc754841.aspx#BKMK_addlocal This will fix the problem you are describing (on that laptop only and only for browsers/other software that uses roots trusted by the OS, i.e. Firefox will still ...


0

If you are looking to trust a root certificate (self-signed certificates are root certificates by definition) on OSX, please see the following post by Apple: https://support.apple.com/kb/PH18677?locale=en_US


1

SSH private keys are usually (by default) encrypted with a strong symmetric cipher. In some circumstances (not production use, of course) it may be viable to have those keys in an accessible shared location for ease of operation. This barely reduces the strength of the key to the strength of the password it is encrypted with, which may be tolerable, ...


1

FYI, I just encountered a case where a credential (possibly corrupt, since it showed up under an entry named with only two, odd Unicode characters) appeared only in the rundll32.exe keymgr.dll,KRShowKeyMgr interface, and not in the Credential Manager interface found in the Windows 7 control panel. So it may be worth checking both interfaces for cached ...


4

What you are supposed to generate is the cryptographic key pair. You keep the private part; the certificate request (CSR) contains the public key. The CA (godaddy) wants your public key since that's what they will put in your certificate. Theoretically, the best place where you can generate the key pair is on the server itself: the value of the private key ...


-1

I was going to write a lengthy article about proxies etc, as well as storing key matter securely, but then i reread your question. Are you using the proxy as a security mechanism, or is it delivering some other functionality? i.e. would you want all connections to go via the proxy, or would some still have to go direct to the frontend? re your ...


58

I suppose that these files are for "his SSH key" as a client. Revealing the public key (id_rsa.pub) has no consequence: when we call it a public key we mean it. The private key (id_rsa) is of course the problem. The way you use, as a client, your private key, is to push the corresponding public key into the server, in the .ssh/authorized_keys of the target ...


21

- Authentication / Access Control People who possess his credentials might be able to login into systems impersonating him. - Non-Repudiation Others will be able to sign messages as him, and he will not be able to deny sending them. - Confidentiality All his private communications can be decrypted and leaked. - Integrity Previous ...


2

its the session to google server called ssl.gstatic.com In short: the ECDSA in the cipher suite refers to the key of the sites certificate. The RSA in the signature refers to the key of the certificates issuer. In detail: To check what kind of certificate you get with this cipher: openssl s_client -connect ssl.gstatic.com:443 \ -cipher ...


1

I cannot reproduce this instance from my machine. Assuming that the server indeed negotiated TLS_ECDHE_ECDSA_WITH_AES_128_GCM_SHA256 and still uses a certificate with a RSA public key, then this would be in violation of the standard, and yet it could still work with some client implementation: the SSL client perfectly knows the type of server public key (it ...


3

From point 1), if you live in those countries, with "spain...etc", if there anyway to check that the CA you are using (in firefox for example or other) is the proper company , for example google/gmail? and not the government one? You can check the certification path to find out which intermediary and root CAs signed the certificate that you are ...


0

When you connect to a site via SSL, the server serves the certificate for that site during the SSL session. In the issuer field of this certificate, the subject of the certificate that was used to sign the site's certificate (i.e. the next certificate up in the chain) is specified. That certificate may have been signed by another certificate, and so on and ...


3

What exactly is this checking? Where is Windows (or more specifically, the Crypto Shell Extension application) populating the information on this tab from? It is showing the trust path it constructed based on the certificates sent in the SSL handshake (ignoring any root certificates sent by the server), the cached intermediate certificates from other ...


4

Since all of the other subquestions have been adequately answered, I will attempt to answer the question regarding registration of domains that are similar to the original. This action is known as typosquatting and since the typosquatter owns the domain, they will have complete control over the verification requests that the SSL certificate authority ...


5

how can they ensure that you are really an admin of this myshop.com, perhaps it was an attacker who requested this certificate to be able to perform man in the middle attack? They can't. If you can receive mail for admin@example.com then you can get a cert for that site. what prevents the same attacker from requesting the certificate for the same ...


12

Certificate Authorities make a living based on their reputation of only giving out certs to the rightful admins of a domain. If a CA starts giving out too many fraudulent certs, the browsers will pull out their root cert and the CA goes bankrupt, so it's in the CA's best interest not to do this. Exactly how a CA verifies the identity of the applicant varies ...


3

A provider of domain-validated certificates will typically ask you to create a TXT DNS record of their choosing for myshop.com or put online a web page of their choosing on http://myshop.com/, to prove that you own the domain. That will generally stop an attacker from getting an SSL certificate for your domain, unless they have already compromised your DNS ...


31

A CA is supposed to make sure that the certificates it issues contain only truthful information. How they do that is their business; serious CA are supposed to publish detailed "Certification Practice Statements" that document their procedures. In practice, when you want to buy a certificate for a www.myshop.com domain, the CA "challenges" you, so that you ...


1

There is no real standard for things in "PEM" format. There was a proposed standard called Privacy-enhanced Electronic Mail, from which the "PEM" acronym was derived; however, that standard never gained traction against its competition (PGP and S/MIME) and nobody implements it. OpenSSL picked up PEM and "enhanced" the PEM format with extra functionalities ...


1

It's actually not as complicated as that, your OS' Certificate Browser will do all the key checking for you. As an example, here's the cert for *.stackexchange.com viewed through the Windows Certificate Viewer. (I clicked the lock icon in Chrome, and "Certificate information") Notice that the Issued by: field lists the display name of the issuing CA. This ...


2

Yes. The Issuer field in the x509 certificate is used to specify the Subject of the next certificate up in the certificate path. If you continue to recurse up the certificate chain, you'll eventually arrive at the Subject name of the root certificate.


3

No. The dialog doesn't add these properties to certificates. It has nothing to do with the currently selected item – it merely adds them to the filter-by-property listbox at the top of the main window. (That's the one that says "Intended purpose: <all>".) (The more specific name is a "certificate purpose", and the technical name is extendedKeyUsage ...


1

That is a good thing that not all properties are check by default because trust should not be enabled by default. As the Microsoft documentation says, the purpose of that property is: Certificates that server programs use to authenticate themselves to clients. Yes, not only the server needs to trust the client, but the client also can request the ...


0

On Windows, there is a small root certificate scanning tool called RCC that you can use to detect if your root store has been compromised. This won't prevent a malicious certificate insertion, but for detection purposes it is fine. http://www.wilderssecurity.com/threads/rcc-check-your-systems-trusted-root-certificate-store.373819/


1

As a user/client, you can revoke a certificate only if it contains the same subject name as the certificate presented for authentication. You can do that using the revocation form provided in the end-entities page. Otherwise only if you are a CA administrator or a Certificate Manager you can do it by yourself. Implement Role-Based Administration: CA ...


0

Certificates can't be changed after they are created, but you can always create/request another. Talk to the company that created your certificate (e.g GoDaddy) and says you want them to revoke your old certificate and issue a new one they will probably create another with SHA2 by default.


5

In my browser (Chrome on Windows) I have certs for both of those CAs. I'm not entirely sure what your question is getting at (Why a CA would have more than one cert? Why a CA would issue off a non-root cert? Why OS X doesn't ship with the root cert?). If you could update your question with more detail, that would be great, but in the meantime I'll try to ...


4

Here's how I would do that: Examine all the test descriptions from sites like badssl and Qualys SSL Server Test. Follow up on links to the actual issues being tested, read and understand the problems. Run Qualys against your server, capture the traffic using tcpdump, and examine the interactions as much as possible to understand what's going on. Set up ...


2

I believe this has recently changed. The latest Baseline Requirements, as of April 2015, include in Section 3.2.3: If an Applicant subject to this Section 3.2.3 is a natural person, then the CA SHALL verify the Applicant’s name, Applicant’s address, and the authenticity of the certificate request. The CA SHALL verify the Applicant’s name using a ...


0

The certificate generates an error because the CN you provided is different from the URL you are using in the browser. To solve the problem, you would have to re-issue the certificate with the correct name. You can also add Subject Alternative Names in the certificate if needed (e.g. you have an internal address and an external address for the appliance).


1

The error message The security certificate presented by this website was issued for a different website's address indicates that the URL that is embedded in the cert is different from the URL that you are typing into the address bar of your browser. Once you put a cert on a server, browsers will only let you access it through its full public domain ...


5

Generally speaking, in the certificate request, these values do not matter. What matters is what appears in the resulting certificate, and the certificate contents will be chosen by the CA, not by you. The certificate request is a vessel to convey your public key to the CA; that request uses a format (normally PKCS#10) that includes a space of a "subject ...


3

The CA/Browser Forum Baseline Requirements (PDF) specifies that these fields in the Subject of the certificate should be filled in accordance with the validation of the identity and address of the requestor by the CA. This validation shall be done with a document or information provided by: A government agency in the jurisdiction of the Applicant’s ...


3

You should provide the information of the company (postal address being the HQ's location) or your own information if you're an individual. Truth is, for an automatically-issued DV (domain validation) certificate, nobody is going to check and all you really care for is that the CN (common name) matches the hostname of the server you're getting the ...


1

The required information are information about the owner of the domain and have nothing to do with the location of the server. This is similar to the registrant in DNS. This means if you own the domain as an individual there is no organization.


5

As per X.509, no problem. You can mix algorithms at will. Each signature is independent. (X.509 includes a special provision for when a CA uses DSS and issues a certificate that also uses DSS with the same group parameters, in which case the issued certificate may omit the group parameters. This is called "parameter inheritance". This is never used in ...


4

In fact you are using the wrong public key to decode the signature. Being part of a PKI, the paypal certificate is signed by an issuer called "Symantec Class 3 EV SSL CA - G2". If you display the certificate with your browser, you should see it. You can find their public key in the certificate as well : ...


2

To my knowledge, there is no requirements on the algorithm for the subordinate CA other than the one the root CA wants to enforce. In fact, rather than looking for a rationale why it would be unacceptable, I would look into a rationale why it is acceptable. Any subordinate CA certificate must be signed by the root CA. And the root CA is representing the ...


0

You do not have to install them. This is the certificate chain the webserver should provide for the clients so they are able to verify the certificate. The CA's root certificate is in the browsers or OS' store of trusted certificates. CA's usually don't sign client's CSRs with the root certs, but with intermediate certificates, which are by themselves ...


1

That does indeed severely compromise security. There are no ifs, ands, or buts about it: if you have CAs that your computer trusts but are not the real ones, anything that relies on the OS store won't work (I believe Firefox has its own certificate store, but then that has to stay secure). See: the Superfish debacle, where the problem was that a hardware ...


0

Android 5.2 and perhaps other 5.x versions should only prompt once on reboot. This should fix your issue. I assume you're running 4.x or older.


43

You are right assuming the certificate is useless without the private key, so sending it in the mail is no big security risk and is common practice actually. The certificate is supposed to be public, connecting to your website would also provide me with your certificate, so no need to hack your email there. edit When starting the connection the server ...


29

Yes, what you are getting in the zip file is exactly what every visitor to your site would get every time they start a TLS session - the public keys with certifying information. The private key is the only thing that should be kept hidden from unauthorized access.


0

I'd say most of your arguments are valid. Typically certs used for signing have different key usage, for example "non repudiation". Many legal requirements (in various countries for example in EU) exists for digital signatures, if they shall be valid in court etc. These requirements do no exist on authentication certificates. All what you state as ...


1

In the subjectDN field of a certificate, there is the certificate owner distinguished name, which is nominally ordered. Its definition really is a SEQUENCE of SET of name elements, so it is an ordered sequence of unordered sets of elements. It is quite rare to have several name elements in the same set (I have seen it done to put the Common Name, First Name ...


3

You can display Subject Alternative Names (SANs) with OpenSSL like this: (I'm using the Facebook.com cert as an example.) Using the x509 subcommand: $ openssl x509 -in facebook-cert.pem.cer -noout -text | grep 'Subject Alternative Name' -A1 X509v3 Subject Alternative Name: DNS:*.facebook.com, DNS:facebook.com, DNS:*.fb.com, ...


2

Certificates are transient in nature: they expire, and must be renewed. Even worse, the validity of a certificate is the property of the current time, since certificates may be revoked at any time. Therefore, if you want to store signed documents, and be able to validate them at a later date, then you need time stamps. See this answer for some details. ...



Top 50 recent answers are included