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-2

My company, Century Longmai Technology Co., Ltd, has been focusing on authentication solutions for years. We have developed standard USB PKI tokens, Mini USB PKI tokens, Wireless PKI tokens, Blue-tooth PKI tokens, Storage USB PKI tokens, Smartcard logon CCID PKI tokens and Driverless PKI tokens. I am sure Longmai solutions will help enriching your business. ...


3

SSL certificates provide two things: Authentication of the organization to whom the visitor is connecting (the organization is verified to be www.foobar.com) Confidentiality of the communication (data is encrypted using the public keys in the certificate) Concerning point 2, there's no difference in using a self-signed cert, a certificate issued from a ...


-2

No, it is even less safe. If you have no knowledge of security or of certificates you should not roll your own. (luckily its not as bad as running your own CA without knowledge) CACert helps you to get the proper values in your certificates so your safe from misuse. the web of trust also means the CAcert will be on par with a face 2 face audit form a ...


0

An offline machine that wants to still verify code signatures, maybe.


1

I believe your understanding is correct. I think Windows stores intermediates because: 1) Having local copies of intermediate certs allows it to "cope" with connection scenarios where the remote server is not chained properly. I've seen scenarios where a web server isn't configured properly but IE doesn't complain. 2) The certificates are used for other ...


0

I can only guess it's to enable caching of frequently used certificates, so that the AIA isn't queried and downloaded for End Entity certs


21

This message is Google trying to push people nilly-willy into the 21st century of cryptography. So they point and mock when they see "RC4" or "SHA-1". This does not mean that such algorithms can be broken immediately. Only that Google would find the world a better place (or possibly a googler place) if everybody were using algorithms more to their liking, ...


1

There is no real difference between machine and user certificates: it's a X509 cert that is used during the TLS handshake as client authentication (client authenticated handshake). The difference is how the certificate is installed and configured on the client: typically, a user certificate will be linked to the user account. depending on the system, it ...


2

The problem isn't your certificate, it's the certificate of googleapis.com, which you're accessing by way of loading their jQuery libraries. If you go directly to one of the scripts, you can click on the padlock icon and see more information about the SSL certificate: +- GeoTrust Global CA +--- Google Internet Authority G2 +----- *.storage.googleapis.com ...


0

The keygen docs at Mozilla, and the keygen docs at w3 don't specify a return format after the POST. What should I return? The reason this information is not listed is because the KeyGen element sends an SPKAC to the server and once a CSR is generated and sent to the CA an x.509 signed client certificate is to be sent back to the client that ...


14

There is nothing at all wrong with running your own internal certificate authority; the vast majority of large companies that I have interacted with have their own internal CA. Advantages The nominal cost of a cert becomes nearly zero when amortized over enough systems and users; when you purchase certificates from an external CA, this will never become ...


3

Short answer: No. I think you won't be happy with only three CAs. Lots of clicking around certificate warnings. This will not make your browsing safer. Also reconsider what you are trying to achieve. I'm assuming, that you want to protect yourself from rogue and/or exploited CAs. So that means CAs that will issue certificates for google.com, etc, when ...


4

The following is a possible series of steps you could take. I'm considering that you have a secondary, online HSM for the period during which the affected HSM is removed from service for repair. Destroy all key material on the HSM Notify vendor of device problem and serial number Return device in tamper evident packaging to vendor address using secure ...


2

You can see the client-side certificate as a key. Wherever the key is installed, the client will be able to connect. At the opposite, wherever the key is not installed, the client will not be able to connect. However, bear in mind that the client-side certificate is actually just a file a browser can import. It is not something hard-linked to a physical ...


1

Large edits because now it is clear that OP is asking about devices which only work as a TLS client... If this is only for client devices than you don't need to update the certificate on the device since there is no certificate on the device. The certificate is on the server (which you need to update) and is checked against the root-CA on the client device. ...


22

Certificates are signed and the cryptographic signature is verified; if the signature matches then the certificate contents are exactly as they were when the certificate was signed. This, of course, does not solve the problem, it merely moves it around. The complete structure is called a PKI. The certificates which are preinstalled in your computer (came ...


6

If a virus installs a new root certificate on your computer, and a spoofed website presents you with a certificate with a valid signature chain from that root certificate, then your computer will accept it as a valid certificate. But this shouldn't be seen as a problem with SSL/TLS -- if you have a virus with that level of access, then there are lots of ways ...


2

Some things to consider when dealing with TLS as a protocol. The payload of the communicating packet is encrypted. The 'dst' & 'src' packet attributes are not, which allows for any device within the network route to intercept your communication. Numerous attack against the SSL & TLS protocol over the years have allowed for the following attack ...


1

The public and private key have the same size (with regards to security, the file size differs of course). It's identical to the size of the modulus when it is regarded as an unsigned integer (and the key size is a full number of bytes, i.e. a multiple of 8 - otherwise it is the location of the highest bit set to one). You are however showing a full X509 ...


0

Perhaps relevant is OpenSSL Certificate Authority Setup . I use this in development environments all the time -- but this is a completely untrustworthy CA. On the other hand, it means that developers who need certs for testing can get them immediately. I've even got a web front end, and a script for an OCSP, again because they are useful for testing. But ...


2

RFC 5280 section 4.1.1.3 talks about the scope of the signature 4.1.1.3. signatureValue The signatureValue field contains a digital signature computed upon the ASN.1 DER encoded tbsCertificate. The ASN.1 DER encoded tbsCertificate is used as the input to the signature function. This signature value is encoded as a BIT STRING and included in ...


2

Actually you do not modify the certificate itself. As explained here, the pfx file is container containing the certificate plus several other objects, including the certificate. What you do in the given procedure is get the certificate out of this container, then put it in another container associated to different objects. The certificate itself remains ...


0

The reason that this is not usually fully automated is that CAs want to protect their own reputation and ensure that the person they are issuing the cert to is the actual owner of the domain (often by speaking on the phone with the applicant). There are different levels of validation / background checking that a CA can perform when issuing, the two main ones ...


1

While thinking about it, I can now definitively answer that some CA offers Web API allowing to automate part or all of the certificate generation / signature. Some concrete example of this are Digicert, GlobalSign, Gandi. Some other CA may therefore offer the same services, however you need to check: The available functionality, not all functions ...


1

Note that EV certs are not structurally different -- they are just a cert issued under a different policy. So you have to check the policy. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Extended_Validation_Certificate#Extended_Validation_certificate_identification You will need to do a fairly extensive table lookup, won't be native to openssl I'm afraid. This is ...


1

Goodness. No it is not safe to send the CSR by email. The comments above regarding the lack of any secrets in the CSR are fine but they miss the point. A certificate authority, by signing a CSR and thus issuing a certificate, is stating that the contents of the CSR are true. As email is an insecure transport then there is no guarantee per se that the CSR ...


1

It may depend on how your certificate is installed. If your client doesn't recognize your certificate, then there's your problem. Go read up on how certificates work to understand what's happening here. If your certificate is installed as a globally-trusted root CA, then the browser will assume that a public CA is behaving badly again, and won't let the ...


2

These sites set the HSTS header (HTTP Strict Transport Security). If you have visited these site without the Burp proxy before, your browser knows (cached) the HSTS policy and sees a mismatch. The HSTS Policy specifies a period of time during which the user shall access the server in a secure-only fashion. HTTP Strict Transport Security (HSTS) is a web ...


0

As part of the handshake for mutual auth SSL, both the server and the client have to prove that they hold the private key corresponding to their cert. If that isn't the case, the SSL handshake will fail. I think that is option (1) of your question.


0

Your Option 2 is sufficient and cryptographically secure. If the CA's signature on the client's certificate validates (and the CA's signing keypair hasn't been revoked due to compromise) then yes, you can assume that the certificate is authentic - ie it was issued by your CA and hasn't been tampered with. Remember that a signature is an encrypted hash of the ...


1

Yes, it is possible for X.509 to be only "TLS client" (actually to have the extended key usage only set to client). I suggest you to take a look at XCA, it is free a graphical tool which will allow to easily create and manage certificates (it is actually a small PKI). You will then be able to visually see all the main options a certificate can have, which ...


1

Note This answer is only applicable under the stated assumptions. I have made them based upon the explicit wording of the question, which explicitly allows for a known attack vector to not be mitigated. Security is a relative balance between the value of loss should an asset be compromised, and the effort (incl. cost etc.) that an adversary is willing to ...


0

Use OAuth2.0 . It not only authorize the user, but also client application with client_id and client_key properties.


0

My solution was to pass subjectAltName via an environment variable. First have this added to openssl.conf: [ san_env ] subjectAltName=${ENV::SAN} Then set the environment variable before invoking openssl: export SAN=DNS:value1,DNS:value2 openssl req -extensions san_env -subj '/CN=value1' ... Note: the -extensions san_env parameter needs to be present ...


-3

If you can't make it, just fake it. ;-) http://www.code-wizards.com/projects/libfaketime/ libfaketime (FakeTime Preload Library) - report faked system time to programs without having to change the system-wide time By faking the system time you can set "Not Before" to any value you like.



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