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32

TL;TR: it is probably a BlueCoat ProxySG or similar proxy which can be configured to behave that way. Nothing to worry about. Details: What you see is a dialog for HTTP basic access authentication. This is not what Facebook uses for authentication. This means that this dialog is not from Facebook itself. My guess is that facebook.com is filtered by your ...


35

This is a proxy authentication pop up! And it's most likely a proxy related attack. When you connect to the Internet through a proxy, you'll be asked to enter username and password if the proxy requires an authentication. For example: Note that the whole text The server http:// ... The server says is editable, and you can change it in the proxy server ...


0

I agree with Steffan that QUIC is no more dangerous than TCP or UDP or HTTP or any other communication protocol. I think for your use case what really matter is the data being transferred through the protocol. Like Steffan said, it really depends on the firewall and the concerns you are trying to address using that firewall. Doing an informal threat ...


1

QUIC by itself is no more dangerous than TCP, UDP, HTTP ... . What matters is the content transferred with the protocol. If you use your firewall only as a simple packet filter and don't do any content inspection (i.e. malware, URL filter etc) then it does not matter much if you allow QUIC or not. If instead your firewall is used to analyse HTTP(s) traffic ...


0

Given that PDF uses postscript for its page layout while web pages use HTML and CSS, it would be exceedingly difficult to write javascript which would perform any useful function in both media. That is not to say that it might be possible to write javascript targeting the PDF conversion and deliver it via a web page, however it is good reason to exclude the ...


0

As I'm aware Google Chrome just provides "security" when you download a file. So answering your question, unless you actually download the file I don't think that Google will check for virus in that specific file. But Google does offer security in a way that prevents scripts that can send information to the server, so it may just do that.


1

I' not sure if this can be really called a vulnerability ... However, this behaviour could be possilby be unwanted. I would imagine a possible exploit like this: User is on a website Make the user click on a button on the left bottom on the screen (fix the position of the button so that it never changes its position on the screen) As soon as the user has ...


3

Yes, it can be a security vulnerability. To exploit it, consider the following scenario. The attacker somehow convinces the user to visit a website under attackers control. A DLL is automatically downloaded to the Downloads folder. The user downloads a legit installer/setup/whatever to the Downloads folder. It is possible that this software is vulnerable ...


0

This is not a security issue in Chrome. This is more of a mistake a user can make. In order for your "attack" to work you need the following steps: 1. Get a user to place your game 2. Download a file with out the user noticing 3. Get him to click close enough to the bottom download bar 4. Assume he made a mistake and clicked the downloaded file The likely ...



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