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2

If you type '/showplaces' on any Skype conversation, Skype will show you the "endpoints" used by your account. Send this information to "Skype Police Dept" (polrequest@skype.net) and they help you out.


5

Down at the bottom-right corner of the Gmail inbox is a "last account activity" line with a "details" link. You can click on that link to get a list of IP addresses that the account has been accessed from.


5

They are designed specifically to not allow this. As you brought up yourself, that would be a massive security risk. If you want to be able to browse your own systems without clicking "confirm security exception" a million times, add the certificates to your trust store on your computer, using the "Certificates" MMC snap-in. This can be done even better ...


3

First, in specific to Google Chrome you will find This article very useful. CullenJ mentioned before that Chrome uses processes not threads, but that is untrue. It uses both. According to the article linked above Chrome uses a thread to handle SQlite database operations and gives the example of cookie operations so we can assume that Chrome stores cookies ...


9

From this page: http://blog.chromium.org/2008/09/multi-process-architecture.html There's only one browser process, which manages the tabs, windows, and "chrome" of the browser. This process also handles all interactions with the disk, network, user input, and display, but it makes no attempt to parse or render any content from the web. And from the ...


35

With a cookie! Chrome, like any other browser, is storing a cookie in your file system. Those cookies are what enable you to reconnect automatically to some site. Since it's in your file system, even if you reboot they will still be there. Multiple processes or not is irrelevant here. Then you might wonder, if the cookies are in my file system, does it ...


2

On Unix systems, the user home directory is associated with the user account and any application can "sense" it by using getpwent(). It so happens that there is a long-standing tradition, in Unix applications who want to learn the user's home directory (e.g. to read or create configuration files), to first look at the HOME environment variable and use its ...


1

From the screenshots, it seems that the problem is: Unable to check whether the certificate has been revoked. Theoretically, a certificate (e.g. from a SSL server) may be accepted by some system (your Web browser) only if the certificate could be validated (a chain could be built, with all names and signatures OK, from a trusted root CA down to the ...


1

First determine the cause of the problem. In your browser you can look at the certificate details for the secure sites you are accessing. This will allow you to look at the start/end date for the certificate (to verify it is still active) as well as the certificate chain (to verify that you are able to verify from the SSL cert through any intermediate issuer ...


2

Identity not verified means that the certificates being provided by the server are not able to be verified by Chrome. Clicking on where the lock symbol would be should give you additional details about why it is failing. Failure can result because the site's certificate is not signed by a root certificate you trust, it could be due to the certificate being ...


0

There are many ways this could have been done. For example, malicious Javascript in an ad or injected through cross-site scripting could redirect the page.



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