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pCloud Transfer is also a good option. It is a simple system for securely transferring files between two parties. The files get temporarily stored in the "cloud" but you can be sure that they will be unreadable to anyone who doesn't know the password you have to provide your recipient with. It's free and requires no registration to use it. I've been using ...


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That's a judgment call you'll have to make for yourself, but their technical overview has what I consider a huge red flag: Which data is stored on the Boxcryptor Key Server Private RSA key (encrypted with the user's password) The fact that your private key is stored on their server, even if it's encrypted with your password, greatly ...


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Depending on the data-protection laws of your country and that of your hoster the files that you store in cloud are your files. That means: storing a blue-ray movie in the cloud is - from the perspective of law - nothing else than storing it on your local hard-drive. Additionally: Since files you put into your cloud drive (say for personal backups) are not ...


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If files are encrypted and that encryption is done competently, then the contents cannot be inspected by third parties. Crucially, this requires (in your situation) that the encryption is done on your computer, with a key (or password) that you keep for yourself, and do not send to anybody else, in particular the people that host the file storage cloud ...


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As @Graham Hill pointed out in his answer, encrypt it properly before it goes up the wire. Amazon does allow you to specify that you'd like them to encrypt your S3 objects, but as they admit in their documentation, you can (and should) encrypt your information before it gets to them. Their own encryption that they add to your objects before/during save only ...


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Amazon EC2 allows you to specify where to store your data: [http://docs.aws.amazon.com/AmazonS3/latest/dev/LocationSelection.html][1] Objects stored in an AWS region never leave that region unless you explicitly transfer them >to another region. For example, objects stored in the EU (Ireland) Region never leave it. As far as how secure is "enough", ...


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From a purely technical perspective, if you encrypt it properly before you upload it, and it stays encrypted all the time it is in the cloud, then the data is very safe. However, there are very probably extra levels of legal compliance you need to meet. This is "Personally Identifiable Information" and there are a lot of laws and regulations that apply to ...


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This is more of a comment than an answer, but apparently I'm not allowed to comment yet. If you're concerned about the privacy of your cloud storage, you may want to consider Tresorit as an alternative to Google Drive. It offers client-side encrypted storage & syncing, so the Tresorit engineers aren't even supposed to be able to tell what files you're ...


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What about hosting those files on other hosting services which have client side encryption like: Tarsnap, which has open source client and does client side encryption. Tahoe-LAFS SparkleShare, which has GUI clients for all operating systems. more on https://prism-break.org/


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To answer one of your questions: any Google employee who has administrative access to the hosts (file servers) on which the drive data is stored will have read-access to your data: this includes the operations engineers, service engineers, system administrators: these type of employees are typically the ones with that type of access. The answer to your ...


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Cryptography is a form of smart obfuscation, it does not make things "secure", just "secure enough, for now". If someone REALLY is out to get you, he would store your encrypted data until a later date when encryption can be broken - anything from stronger computers to software vulnerabilities like "heartbleed" will do the trick to decrypt your stuff in the ...


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Apart from statements like NSA has your data when uploading it is based on the assumption that your data being on your disk is not somehow accessible. Like others stated, if your data is encrypted in a strong manner on your disk and uploaded in the same way I would regard the online version more safe in terms of redundancy (google is managing the replication ...


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Not instantly. Although, that's what I want to believe. What you could do is the following. Download the Truecrypt version 7.1a and create an encrypted storage file (option 1 from the wizard) and choose 3 algorithm based encryption with a SHA-512 key. Put all your sensitive files in here and upload the encrypted file to Google Drive. When you want to work ...


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Any data you upload to Google Drive (or Skydrive, or Dropbox for that matter) should be considered duplicated by the NSA. Apart from arbitrary queries from the aforementioned secret service, law enforcement agencies from any country may gain access to them through legal means (subpoenas and so on). And of course, Google engineers could in theory browse your ...


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Google has access (obviously). The police will have access if they have a valid search warrant. A national security letter will give the FBI secret access. Various three-letter agencies may have access, depending on how they're doing at circumventing Google's encryption. (Google started encrypting its internal traffic after it was revealed that the NSA was ...



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