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0

If you were to use the TOR Browser Bundle, you would be using a browser that starts fresh every time that it runs with a new IP. It will also block plugins to prevent your real IP from being discovered through them. However, you could get banned for using TOR to have an account, because someone else may log in with the same IP address or they could just ...


0

The internet works in a set of layers. Each one supposedly independent of one another. Up at the top, where the session layer sits, the cookies are meant to maintain the identity of the web user. Since IP addresses can shift and change, what people are really interested in is the identity associated with the cookie itself, which is why you see so much effort ...


3

Not inherently, no. Cookies and IP addresses are independent. However, if you use the same browser for Tor and non-Tor access to the site, the same cookies will be sent both times, negating any benefit you would otherwise gain from using Tor. Tor is not a cure-all for anonymity issues, it's merely one tool to use. There are many ways you can be tracked ...


1

The application gives an error exposing sensitive information cause that specific error is not handled by the developer. The developer should either sanitize the data or handle the error giving HTTP 500 error. More info


2

I think the way to read those three points is as three parts of one vulnerability, and are best read in a different order. HSTS does make a difference on HTTPS connections, and in fact a very significant one: HSTS does not allow users to click through a warning from the browser. All certificate validation errors with HSTS are fatal; the browser will not ...


0

I could be wrong here, but I beleive it has to do with certificate pinning in the UA. "They preload a specific set of public key hashes into the HSTS configuration, which limits the valid certificates to only those which indicate the specified public key." So I suppose in this attack scenario, the subdomain would be blocked by HSTS because it isn't ...


2

The problem is caused by the app expecting the cookie's value to be something without first checking if that value is indeed something to be able to exit gracefully if it's not, and instead ends up throwing an (unhandled) exception. What the developer should do first is to disable error display on the production servers and instead just returning a 500 ...


2

Basically, HSTS allows a site to store a flag (true or false) - in other Words a bit, in a web browser. Storing HSTS super cookies are accomplished in this way: Lets say we want to store the value A, binary 01000001. We can then store this as by redirecting the user to a series of websites, like https://00.example.org indicating HSTS=off redirecting to: ...


-1

All X- headers are experimental headers that haven't made it into the standards. You won't see anything about the header insertions if you don't inspect your headers at the appropriate point in the pipeline. Also, look at this thread: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/3561381/custom-http-headers-naming-conventions The abnf quoting indicates the ...


1

Somehow I ended up on your question when googling for something else. Anyways: Here is a website to test for the header: http://uidh.crud.net/ . Verizon achieves this (adding the header info) by what is essentially a man in the middle attack on all HTTP traffic on port 80. Since they control the ingress and egress of your unencrypted data, it's pretty easy ...


0

You can do what Google, Facebook etc. do (and the reason why people keep the page open): add some sort of updating widget using AJAX. If the page has been left open, then the AJAX widget will run and will make a request at intervals, keeping the session current. If the user has logged out, the session begins aging and can be purged after some time. In ...


2

Due to the Same-Origin-Policy(SoP), CSRF and XSS have a kind of rock-paper-scissors relationship. All CSRF prevention methods rely upon the SoP, and XSS in a fundamental bypass of the SoP. In the case of reflected XSS, you need a "cross-site request" in order to deliver the JavaScript payload, so in this cases a CSRF token can make reflective XSS ...



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